Special Issue "Alcoholic Beverages and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Macronutrients and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Emilio Sacanella
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: nutrition; inflammation; adhesion molecules; wine; beer; alcohol; cardiovascular disease; oxidative stress; polyphenols; aging
Dr. Rosa M. Casas
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: medite nutrition; inflammation; adhesion molecules; wine; beer; alcohol; cardiovascular disease; oxidative stress; polyphenols; aging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, several epidemiological studies have identified alcohol consumption as a modifiable factor that influences, positively and negatively, several diseases. Consistent epidemiological evidence has pointed out that heavy or binge alcohol consumption is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, there is large body of scientific evidence that moderate alcohol consumption might be salutary. Whether benefits observed are due to the direct action of alcohol itself or caused by components present in alcoholic beverages such as polyphenols remains unclear. Moderate consumption of wine and beer, which are rich in polyphenols, seems to confer cardiovascular protective effects in healthy subjects and even in patients with reported CVD, whilst there is low scientific evidence concerning its protective effect for neurocognitive diseases. Several observational and interventional trials have shown the inverse association between moderate alcohol consumption and inflammatory markers, lipid profile, glucose metabolism, endothelial function and blood pressure, among others. This Special Issue will include original research articles as well as review articles addressing various aspects of the impact of alcohol on health.

Based on your expertise in this field, we think you could make an excellent contribution of either evidence-based original research or a review of relevant scientific literature.

Dr. Emilio Sacanella
Dr. Rosa M. Casas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Alcohol consumption
  • Ethanol
  • Alcohol patterns
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Ethanol
  • Epidemiology
  • Cardiovascular
  • Cancer
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Molecular targets
  • Acetaldehyde
  • Alcohol metabolites
  • Drinking patterns
  • Lifestyle modifications

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Oxidative Stress Parameters in the Liver of Growing Male Rats Receiving Various Alcoholic Beverages
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010158 - 06 Jan 2020
Abstract
Typical alcohol consumption begins in the adolescence period, increasing the risk of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in adolescents and young adults, and while the pathophysiology of ALD is still not completely understood, it is believed that oxidative stress may be the major contributor [...] Read more.
Typical alcohol consumption begins in the adolescence period, increasing the risk of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in adolescents and young adults, and while the pathophysiology of ALD is still not completely understood, it is believed that oxidative stress may be the major contributor that initiates and promotes the progression of liver damage. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of alcohol consumption on the markers of oxidative stress and liver inflammation in the animal model of prolonged alcohol consumption in adolescents using various alcoholic beverages. In a homogenic group of 24 male Wistar rats (4 groups—6 animals per group), since 30th day of life, in order to mimic the alcohol consumption since adolescence, animals received (1) no alcoholic beverage (control group), (2) ethanol solution, (3) red wine, or (4) beer (experimental groups) for 6 weeks. Afterwards, the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), as well as levels of cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl groups, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukine-10 (IL-10) were measured in liver homogenates. The difference between studied groups was observed for CYP2E1 and protein carbonyl groups levels (increased levels for animals receiving beer compared with control group), as well as for ALT activity (decreased activity for animals receiving beer compared with other experimental groups) (p < 0.05). The results suggested that some components of beer, other than ethanol, are responsible for its influence on the markers of oxidative stress and liver inflammation observed in the animal model of prolonged alcohol consumption in adolescents. Taking this into account, beer consumption in adolescents, which is a serious public health issue, should be assessed in further studies to broaden the knowledge of the progression of liver damage caused by alcohol consumption in this group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2764; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112764 - 14 Nov 2019
Abstract
The relationship between alcohol consumption and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome is not consistent and may vary between populations, depending on age, sex, ethnicity, cultural traditions and lifestyle. We have hypothesized that moderate alcohol consumption will be associated with the lowest risk of [...] Read more.
The relationship between alcohol consumption and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome is not consistent and may vary between populations, depending on age, sex, ethnicity, cultural traditions and lifestyle. We have hypothesized that moderate alcohol consumption will be associated with the lowest risk of the syndrome. The aim of the present study is to examine the relationship between the current consumption of alcohol and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components. The research material includes data obtained from 12,285 men and women, in the age range of 37–66 years. Multiple logistic regression was used in the statistical analysis. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation. In men, a current consumption of >30 g of alcohol/day was significantly associated with a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.25–2.39), high blood pressure (OR = 2.76, 95% CI = 1.64–4.65), elevated glucose concentration (OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.24–2.32), and abdominal obesity (OR = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.07–2.92). In women, the consumption from 10.1 to 15.0 g of alcohol was associated only with a higher risk of abnormal glucose concentration (OR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.14–2.38.) In both sexes, current alcohol consumption was associated with higher high-density lipoproteins (HDL)-cholesterol concentration (p < 0.05). No relationship was found between alcohol consumption and triglyceride concentration. It is difficult to formulate unequivocal recommendations regarding alcohol intake in MetS prophylaxis due to its different association with particular MetS components. In order to explain the causal relationship between alcohol consumption and MetS and its components, prospective studies are necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages and Human Health)
Open AccessArticle
Moderate Alcohol Consumption Inhibits Sodium-Dependent Glutamine Co-Transport in Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Vitro and Ex Vivo
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2516; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102516 - 18 Oct 2019
Abstract
Malnutrition is present in chronic alcoholics. However, how moderate alcohol consumption affects the absorption of nutrients like glutamine has not been investigated. Glutamine, an amino acid, is vital to gastrointestinal health. Glutamine is absorbed via sodium-dependent glutamine co-transport (B0AT1; SLC6A19) along the [...] Read more.
Malnutrition is present in chronic alcoholics. However, how moderate alcohol consumption affects the absorption of nutrients like glutamine has not been investigated. Glutamine, an amino acid, is vital to gastrointestinal health. Glutamine is absorbed via sodium-dependent glutamine co-transport (B0AT1; SLC6A19) along the brush border membrane of absorptive villus cells. Rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18) and sixteen-week-old Sprague Dawley rats were administered the equivalent of a 0.04% blood alcohol content of ethanol (8.64 mM; 2 g/kg) to investigate the effect of moderate alcohol on sodium-glutamine co-transport. Sodium-dependent 3H-glutamine uptakes were performed to measure B0AT1 activity. Inorganic phosphate was measured as a function of Na-K-ATPase activity. Protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis. Ethanol significantly inhibited sodium-dependent glutamine absorption and Na-K-ATPase activity in enterocytes in vitro and ex vivo. Kinetic studies suggested that the mechanism of inhibition was due to decreased maximal rate of uptake (Vmax) of the B0AT1 co-transporter, corresponding to decreased B0AT1 protein expression and secondary to an inhibited sodium-gradient at the cellular level in vitro and ex vivo. In all, moderate ethanol significantly inhibited glutamine absorption at the level of decreased B0AT1 expression at the brush border membrane and a reduced sodium gradient, which may contribute to malnutrition present in chronic alcoholics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Observational Cohort Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2121; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092121 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
Alcohol consumption is a significant public health issue worldwide. The rat model and epidemiological studies have both reported conflicting results about the effects of alcohol on the kidneys. We aimed to explore the relationships between alcohol consumption and chronic kidney disease. Data from [...] Read more.
Alcohol consumption is a significant public health issue worldwide. The rat model and epidemiological studies have both reported conflicting results about the effects of alcohol on the kidneys. We aimed to explore the relationships between alcohol consumption and chronic kidney disease. Data from the National Health Interview Survey, the National Health Insurance research database, and the National Deaths Dataset were used. Standardized in-person interviews were executed in 2001, 2005, and 2009 to obtain the demographic characteristics of study population. The participants were followed up until 2013. The primary outcome was new-onset chronic kidney disease. We analyzed 45,200 adults older than 18 years (50.8% men and 49.2% women), and the overall mean (SD) age was 42.73 (16.64) years. During the 8.5 (3.5) years of follow-up, new-onset chronic kidney disease was recognized in 1535 (5.5%), 292 (2.7%), and 317 (4.9%) non-drinking, social-drinking, and regular-drinking participants, respectively. The participants who were social and regular drinkers had a significantly decreased risk of chronic kidney disease incidence (social drinking: adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.74–0.97; p = 0.018; regular-drinking: AHR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74–0.98; p = 0.024), with baseline demographics and comorbidities adjusted. In conclusion, social and regular drinkers had decreased risk of chronic kidney disease when compared with non-drinkers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages and the Prevalence of Cardiovascular Diseases in Men and Women: A Cross-Sectional Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1318; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061318 - 12 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Associations between alcohol consumption and the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases have been the subject of several studies for a long time; however, the presence and nature of any associations still remain unclear. The aim of the study was to analyze the associations between [...] Read more.
Associations between alcohol consumption and the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases have been the subject of several studies for a long time; however, the presence and nature of any associations still remain unclear. The aim of the study was to analyze the associations between the consumption of alcoholic beverages and the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in men and women. The data of 12,285 individuals aged 37–66 were used in the analysis. Multiple logistic regression models were utilized to estimate odds ratios and confidence intervals. The multivariable models included several potential confounders including age, education, marital status, body mass index (BMI), physical activity, smoking, coffee consumption, and statin use. The analyses were performed separately for men and women. In the model adjusted for confounders, the consumption from 0.1 to 10.0 g of alcohol/day was related to a lower risk of coronary disease and stroke (p < 0.05), and the consumption from 0.1 to 15.0 g/day was related to a lower risk of hypertension in women (p < 0.05). In men, in the adjusted model, there were no associations between alcohol consumption and the occurrence of hypertension or stroke. The risk of circulatory failure was significantly lower in the group in which participants drank more than 20.0 g of alcohol/day (p < 0.05) compared to nondrinkers. The risk of coronary disease was lower in drinkers at every level of alcohol consumption (p < 0.05) compared to nondrinkers. Alcohol consumption was related to a lower prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), both in men and women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages and Human Health)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Relationship of Wine Consumption with Alzheimer’s Disease
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010206 - 13 Jan 2020
Abstract
Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most threatening neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the loss of memory and language function, an unbalanced perception of space, and other cognitive and physical manifestations. The pathology of AD is characterized by neuronal loss and the extensive distribution [...] Read more.
Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most threatening neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the loss of memory and language function, an unbalanced perception of space, and other cognitive and physical manifestations. The pathology of AD is characterized by neuronal loss and the extensive distribution of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The role of environment and the diet in AD is being actively studied, and nutrition is one of the main factors playing a prominent role in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In this context, the relationship between dementia and wine use/abuse has received increased research interest, with varying and often conflicting results. Scope and Approach: With this review, we aimed to critically summarize the main relevant studies to clarify the relationship between wine drinking and AD, as well as how frequency and/or amount of drinking may influence the effects. Key Findings and Conclusions: Overall, based on the interpretation of various studies, no definitive results highlight if light to moderate alcohol drinking is detrimental to cognition and dementia, or if alcohol intake could reduce risk of developing AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Benefits and Risks of Moderate Alcohol Consumption on Cardiovascular Disease: Current Findings and Controversies
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010108 - 30 Dec 2019
Abstract
Alcohol has a hormetic physiological behavior that results in either increased or decreased cardiovascular risk depending on the amount consumed, drinking frequency, pattern of consumption, and the outcomes under study or even the type of alcoholic beverage consumed. However, the vast majority of [...] Read more.
Alcohol has a hormetic physiological behavior that results in either increased or decreased cardiovascular risk depending on the amount consumed, drinking frequency, pattern of consumption, and the outcomes under study or even the type of alcoholic beverage consumed. However, the vast majority of studies elucidating the role of alcohol in cardiovascular and in the global burden of disease relies on epidemiological studies of associative nature which carry several limitations. This is why the cardiovascular benefits of low–moderate alcohol consumption are being questioned and perhaps might have been overestimated. Thus, the aim of this review was to critically discuss the current knowledge on the relationship between alcohol intake and cardiovascular disease. Besides new evidence associating low and moderate alcohol consumption with decreased risk of cardiovascular disease, several questions remain unanswered related to the concrete amount of safe consumption, the type of alcoholic beverage, and the age-, sex-, and genetic/ethnical-specific differences in alcohol consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages and Human Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop