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Nutritional Value and Health Benefits of Dietary Bioactive Compounds

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 September 2024 | Viewed by 2826

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
2. Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INYTA) ‘José Mataix’, Biomedical Research Centre, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
2. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs, Granada, Spain
Interests: nutrition; metabolomics; food science
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many changes in the dietary habits of the population, characterized by high intake of energy, red meat, sugars, salt, and fats and the low consumption of whole-grain cereals, fruit and vegetables, legumes, and nuts, make current food consumption patterns unsustainable from a health point of view. Along with this negative trend, it is possible to observe an increasing demand for food-based products that are capable of preventing or alleviating different diseases. Health benefits beyond the basic nutritional value are related to their composition in bioactive compounds. For this reason, the search for bioactive compounds from natural sources and the evaluation of their bioactivity is being increasingly undertaken with the purpose of helping consumers maintain or improve their quality of life. Additionally, bioactive compounds are being used increasingly for nutraceuticals and functional food development.

This research topic aims to increase the knowledge of bioactive compound composition in different foods, including plants or plant-based by-products that have a potential beneficial impact on health.

We welcome reviews (systematic and narrative) and mini-reviews, original research papers (in vitro and in vivo), perspective papers, hypothesis and theory papers, methods papers, and case reports.

Dr. Celia Rodriguez Perez
Dr. Vito Verardo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • health
  • diet
  • by-products
  • plant-based foods
  • bioactivity
  • functional foods
  • nutraceuticals
  • phytochemicals
  • characterization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 881 KiB  
Article
A New Alternative Nutritional Source Hawthorn Vinegar: How It Interacts with Protein, Glucose and GLP-1
by Nilay Seyidoglu, Deniz Karakçı, Hale Ergin Eğritağ and Seydi Yıkmış
Nutrients 2024, 16(13), 2163; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16132163 - 8 Jul 2024
Viewed by 448
Abstract
(1) Background: There is a balance between nutrition, glycemic control, and immune response. Their roles in physiological mechanisms are essential for maintaining life quality. This study aimed to evaluate hawthorn vinegar’s metabolic effects, and describe its possible mechanism. We also pointed out several [...] Read more.
(1) Background: There is a balance between nutrition, glycemic control, and immune response. Their roles in physiological mechanisms are essential for maintaining life quality. This study aimed to evaluate hawthorn vinegar’s metabolic effects, and describe its possible mechanism. We also pointed out several vinegar production methods to clarify the antioxidant features. (2) Methods: In the study, three vinegar techniques were applied to vinegar: traditional production of hawthorn vinegar (N), thermal pasteurization (P), and ultrasound method (U). Thirty-two female adult Wistar albino rats were randomly separated into four groups: Control, N1 (regular vinegar; 1 mL/kg bw), P1 (pasteurized vinegar; 1 mL/kg bw), and U1(ultrasound treated vinegar; 1 mL/kg bw). Vinegar was administered by oral gavage daily for 45 days. Initial and final weights, the percentage changes of body weight gains, and Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) values of plasma and liver were measured. The total protein, globulin, and albumin values of plasma, liver, and intestinal tissue were determined. In addition, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose concentrations were evaluated. (3) Results: There was a statistical increase in total intestinal protein value and an increasing tendency in total protein in plasma and liver in group U1 compared to group Control. However, the GGT concentrations in plasma and liver were slightly lower in group U1 than in group Control. In addition, there were significant increases in plasma GLP-1 values in all experimental groups compared to the Control group (p: 0.015; 576.80 ± 56.06, 773.10 ± 28.92, 700.70 ± 17.05 and 735.00 ± 40.70; respectively groups control, N1, P1, and U1). Also, liver GLP-1 concentrations in groups P1 and U1 were higher than in group Control (p: 0.005; 968.00 ± 25.54, 1176 ± 17.54 and 1174.00 ± 44.06, respectively groups control, P1 and U1). On the other hand, significant decreases were found in plasma glucose concentrations in groups N1 and U1 as to the Control group (p: 0.02; Control: 189.90 ± 15.22, N1: 133.10 ± 7.32 and U1: 142.30 ± 4.14). Besides, liver glucose levels were lower in all experimental groups than in group Control statistically (p: 0.010; 53.47 ± 0.97, 37.99 ± 1.46, 44.52 ± 4.05 and 44.57 ± 2.39, respectively groups control, N1, P1, and U1). (4) Conclusions: The findings suggest that hawthorn vinegar can balance normal physiological conditions via intestinal health, protein profiles, and glycemic control. Additionally, ultrasound application of vinegar may improve the ability of hawthorn vinegar, and have positive effects on general health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Value and Health Benefits of Dietary Bioactive Compounds)
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21 pages, 508 KiB  
Article
Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Parallel Group Nutritional Study to Evaluate the Effects of Routine Intake of Fresh vs. Pasteurized Yogurt on the Immune System in Healthy Adults
by Fernando Rivero-Pino, Mar Casquete, Maria José Castro, Paz Redondo del Rio, Eloina Gutierrez, Agustín Mayo-Iscar, Mercedes Nocito and Alfredo Corell
Nutrients 2024, 16(12), 1969; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16121969 - 20 Jun 2024
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Abstract
The immune system is affected by the dietary products humans intake. Immune system regulation by nutrition has uses in the clinical context, but it can also benefit healthy populations by delaying or preventing the emergence of immune-mediated chronic illnesses. In this study, the [...] Read more.
The immune system is affected by the dietary products humans intake. Immune system regulation by nutrition has uses in the clinical context, but it can also benefit healthy populations by delaying or preventing the emergence of immune-mediated chronic illnesses. In this study, the purpose was to describe and compare the modulator effects on the immune system of the routine ingestion of fresh vs. pasteurized yogurt. A unicentral, prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group 8-week nutritional study was carried out comparing the ingestion of 125 g of the products in healthy adults three times a day. A complete battery of in vitro tests on the activity of the immune system, processes and phenomena was performed. Exclusive immune-modulatory effects of fresh yogurt with respect to base line were found in terms of increased systemic IgM (primary immune responses), increased synthesis of IFN-gamma upon stimulation (Th1) and increased peripheral T cells (mainly “naive” CD4s). In the three interventions, we observed an increased phagocytic activity and burst test in granulocytes, together with increased secretion of IL-6, IL-1 β and IL-8 (pro-inflammatory) and increased CD16 expression (FcR favoring phagocytosis) in granulocytes. Overall, it is concluded that regardless of bacteria being alive or thermally inactivated, yogurt has common effects on the innate system, but the presence of live bacteria is necessary to achieve a potentiating effect on the specific immune response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Value and Health Benefits of Dietary Bioactive Compounds)
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12 pages, 5150 KiB  
Article
Hawthorn Vinegar in Health with a Focus on Immune Responses
by Nilay Seyidoglu, Deniz Karakçı, Buket Bakır and Seydi Yıkmış
Nutrients 2024, 16(12), 1868; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16121868 - 14 Jun 2024
Viewed by 496
Abstract
Background: The hawthorn fruit is an interesting medicinal plant that has several biological features, especially related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immune-modulating actions, and boosting general health. In this study, we aimed to clarify the immunological effects of hawthorn vinegar on immunity and general [...] Read more.
Background: The hawthorn fruit is an interesting medicinal plant that has several biological features, especially related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immune-modulating actions, and boosting general health. In this study, we aimed to clarify the immunological effects of hawthorn vinegar on immunity and general health. We also focused on three different production processes to improve the antioxidant activity of hawthorn vinegar (2) Methods: In the study, besides the traditional production of hawthorn vinegar (N), thermal pasteurization (P) and ultrasound (U) techniques were applied to vinegars. A total of 56 female adult Wistar albino rats were randomly allocated into seven groups; Control, N0.5 (regular vinegar; 0.5 mL/kgbw), N1 (regular vinegar; 1 mL/kgbw), P0.5 (pasteurized vinegar; 0.5 mL/kgbw), P1 (pasteurized vinegar; 1 mL/kgbw), U0.5 (ultrasound treated vinegar; 0.5 mL/kgbw), and U1 (ultrasound treated vinegar; 1 mL/kgbw). Vinegars were administered by oral gavage daily. The average weight gains, body mass index, and blood hematological parameters were measured, and the Neutrophil Lymphocyte ratio was calculated. The plasma IL-1β and TNF-α values, and MDA, IL-1β and TNF-α values of intestinal tissue, were determined. Also, the streptavidin–biotin–peroxidase complex method was applied to determine the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β in duodenum. (3) Results: There was a decreasing tendency in the average weight gains in all vinegar groups compared to the control group. In addition, there was an increase in NL ratio in all vinegar groups, although not significant. There were no statistical differences among all vinegar groups, although decreases were observed in plasma IL-1β. Also, the plasma TNF-α values showed slight increases in high-dose-of-vinegar groups (N1, P1 and U1), although not significant. In addition, the intestinal tissue IL-1β value tended to increase in groups N0.5, N1 and P0.5, while it tended to decrease in P1, U0.5 and U1. On the other hand, there were slight increases in the TNF-α values of intestinal tissue in all groups compared to control, although these were not significant. Furthermore, the intensive expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β were determined in groups U0.5 and U1. (4) Conclusions: The results suggest that either high doses or ultrasound applications of hawthorn vinegar have positive effects on intestinal health, boosting immunity and general health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Value and Health Benefits of Dietary Bioactive Compounds)
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14 pages, 1180 KiB  
Article
Mixture of Rhodiola rosea and Nelumbo nucifera Extracts Ameliorates Sleep Quality of Adults with Sleep Disturbance
by Yunna Kim, Won Kyung Lee, Hyein Jeong, Hyuck Jai Choi, Mi-Kyung Lee and Seung-Hun Cho
Nutrients 2024, 16(12), 1867; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16121867 - 14 Jun 2024
Viewed by 557
Abstract
Chronic sleep disturbance affects daily functioning, leading to decreased concentration, fatigue, and higher healthcare costs. Traditional insomnia medications are often associated with adverse side effects. This study investigated the efficacy of a novel compound derived from Rhodiola rosea and Nelumbo nucifera extracts (named [...] Read more.
Chronic sleep disturbance affects daily functioning, leading to decreased concentration, fatigue, and higher healthcare costs. Traditional insomnia medications are often associated with adverse side effects. This study investigated the efficacy of a novel compound derived from Rhodiola rosea and Nelumbo nucifera extracts (named RNE) in improving sleep quality with fewer side effects. The study included individuals between the ages of 20 and 65 with subthreshold insomnia and evaluated the effects of RNE on sleep, fatigue, and quality of life. Participants took 750 mg of RNE daily at bed-time for two weeks. The study used the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a sleep diary, the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) for assessments. Of the 20 participants, 13 completed the study and showed significant improvements in sleep quality. The results showed improvements in ISI and PSQI scores, a 57% reduction in wake-time after sleep onset, and improved sleep efficiency. Although FSS scores remained unchanged, significant improvements were seen in SF-36 physical and mental health scores. The results suggest that RNE is an effective, low-risk option for sleep disturbance, significantly improving sleep quality and overall wellbeing without significant side effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Value and Health Benefits of Dietary Bioactive Compounds)
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