Special Issue "Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for (Bio)Sensors Development"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Simone Morais Website E-Mail
REQUIMTE–LAQV, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, 4249-015 Porto, Portugal
Interests: analytical and environmental chemistry; (bio)sensors; chemically modified electrodes; application of nanofunctional materials; new methodologies for (electro)analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon-based nanomaterials have been increasingly used in sensors and biosensors design due to their advantageous intrinsic properties that include but are not limited to high electrical and thermal conductivity, chemical stability, optical properties, large specific surface, biocompatibility, and easy functionalization. The most commonly applied carbonaceous nanomaterials are carbon nanotubes (single or multiwalled nanotubes) and graphene, but promising data have been also reported for (bio)sensors based on carbon quantum dots and fullerene, among others. The incorporation of carbon-based nanomaterials, independently of the detection scheme and developed platform type (mechanical, thermal, optical, magnetic, chemical, and biological), has a major beneficial effect on the (bio)sensor sensitivity, specificity, and overall performance. As a consequence, carbon-based nanomaterials have been promoting a revolution in the field of (bio)sensors with the development of increasingly sensitive devices.

Thus, the aim of this Special Issue is to publish and disseminate original research data, review articles, communications, and short notes that focus on new (experimental or theoretical) advances, challenges, and outlooks concerning preparation, characterization, and application of carbon-based nanomaterials for (bio)sensors development.

Prof. Dr. Simone Morais
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • Nanoprobes, electronic noses, and sensors
  • Graphene
  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Carbon quantum dots
  • Fullerene
  • Nanodiamonds
  • Nanohybrids and nanocomposites
  • Coatings and thin films
  • Synthesis
  • Characterization
  • Functionalization
  • Applications

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Terbium Functionalized Schizochytrium-Derived Carbon Dots for Ratiometric Fluorescence Determination of the Anthrax Biomarker
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(9), 1234; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9091234 - 30 Aug 2019
Abstract
Efficient and instant detection of biological threat-agent anthrax is highly desired in the fields of medical care and anti-terrorism. Herein, a new ratiometric fluorescence (FL) nanoprobe was elaborately tailored for the determination of 2,6-dipicolinic acid (DPA), a biomarker of anthrax spores, by grafting [...] Read more.
Efficient and instant detection of biological threat-agent anthrax is highly desired in the fields of medical care and anti-terrorism. Herein, a new ratiometric fluorescence (FL) nanoprobe was elaborately tailored for the determination of 2,6-dipicolinic acid (DPA), a biomarker of anthrax spores, by grafting terbium ions (Tb3+) to the surface of carbon dots (CDs). CDs with blue FL were fabricated by a simple and green method using schizochytrium as precursor and served as an FL reference and a supporting substrate for coordination with Tb3+. On account of the absorbance energy transfer emission effect (AETE), green emission peaks of Tb3+ in CDs-Tb nanoprobe appeared at 545 nm upon the addition of DPA. Under optimal conditions, good linearity between the ratio FL intensity of F545/F445 and the concentrations of DPA was observed within the experimental concentration range of 0.5–6 μM with the detection limit of 35.9 nM, which is superior to several literature studies and significantly lower than the infectious dosage of the Bacillus anthracis spores. Moreover, the CDs-Tb nanoprobe could sensitively detect DPA in the lake water sample. This work offers an efficient self-calibrating and background-free method for the determination of DPA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for (Bio)Sensors Development)
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Open AccessArticle
Bioinspired Cilia Sensors with Graphene Sensing Elements Fabricated Using 3D Printing and Casting
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 954; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070954 - 30 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Sensor designs found in nature are optimal due to their evolution over millions of years, making them well-suited for sensing applications. However, replicating these complex, three-dimensional (3D), biomimetic designs in artificial and flexible sensors using conventional techniques such as lithography is challenging. In [...] Read more.
Sensor designs found in nature are optimal due to their evolution over millions of years, making them well-suited for sensing applications. However, replicating these complex, three-dimensional (3D), biomimetic designs in artificial and flexible sensors using conventional techniques such as lithography is challenging. In this paper, we introduce a new processing paradigm for the simplified fabrication of flexible sensors featuring complex and bioinspired structures. The proposed fabrication workflow entailed 3D-printing a metallic mold with complex and intricate 3D features such as a micropillar and a microchannel, casting polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) inside the mold to obtain the desired structure, and drop-casting piezoresistive graphene nanoplatelets into the predesigned microchannel to form a flexible strain gauge. The graphene-on-PDMS strain gauge showed a high gauge factor of 37 as measured via cyclical tension-compression tests. The processing workflow was used to fabricate a flow sensor inspired by hair-like ‘cilia’ sensors found in nature, which comprised a cilia-inspired pillar and a cantilever with a microchannel that housed the graphene strain gauge. The sensor showed good sensitivity against both tactile and water flow stimuli, with detection thresholds as low as 12 µm in the former and 58 mm/s in the latter, demonstrating the feasibility of our method in developing flexible flow sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for (Bio)Sensors Development)
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Open AccessArticle
Facile Synthesis of MnO2 Nanoflowers/N-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite and Its Application for Simultaneous Determination of Dopamine and Uric Acid
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060847 - 02 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
This study reports facile synthesis of MnO2 nanoflowers/N-doped reduced graphene oxide (MnO2NFs/NrGO) composite and its application on the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). The microstructures, morphologies, and electrochemical performances of MnO2NFs/NrGO were studied using [...] Read more.
This study reports facile synthesis of MnO2 nanoflowers/N-doped reduced graphene oxide (MnO2NFs/NrGO) composite and its application on the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). The microstructures, morphologies, and electrochemical performances of MnO2NFs/NrGO were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. The electrochemical experiments showed that the MnO2NFs/NrGO composites have the largest effective electroactive area and lowest charge transfer resistance. MnO2NFs/NrGO nanocomposites displayed superior catalytic capacity toward the electro-oxidation of DA and UA due to the synergistic effect from MnO2NFs and NrGO. The anodic peak currents of DA and UA increase linearly with their concentrations varying from 0.2 μM to 6.0 μM. However, the anodic peak currents of DA and UA are highly correlated to the Napierian logarithm of their concentrations ranging from 6.0 μM to 100 μM. The detection limits are 0.036 μM and 0.029 μM for DA and UA, respectively. Furthermore, the DA and UA levels of human serum samples were accurately detected by the proposed sensor. Combining with prominent advantages such as facile preparation, good sensitivity, and high selectivity, the proposed MnO2NFs/NrGO nanocomposites have become the most promising candidates for the simultaneous determination of DA and UA from various actual samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for (Bio)Sensors Development)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Carbon Nanofiber-Based Functional Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 1045; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9071045 - 22 Jul 2019
Abstract
Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) exhibit great potentials in the fields of materials science, biomedicine, tissue engineering, catalysis, energy, environmental science, and analytical science due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Usually, CNFs with flat, mesoporous, and porous surfaces can be synthesized by chemical [...] Read more.
Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) exhibit great potentials in the fields of materials science, biomedicine, tissue engineering, catalysis, energy, environmental science, and analytical science due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Usually, CNFs with flat, mesoporous, and porous surfaces can be synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and electrospinning techniques with subsequent chemical treatment. Meanwhile, the surfaces of CNFs are easy to modify with various materials to extend the applications of CNF-based hybrid nanomaterials in multiple fields. In this review, we focus on the design, synthesis, and sensor applications of CNF-based functional nanomaterials. The fabrication strategies of CNF-based functional nanomaterials by adding metallic nanoparticles (NPs), metal oxide NPs, alloy, silica, polymers, and others into CNFs are introduced and discussed. In addition, the sensor applications of CNF-based nanomaterials for detecting gas, strain, pressure, small molecule, and biomacromolecules are demonstrated in detail. This work will be beneficial for the readers to understand the strategies for fabricating various CNF-based nanomaterials, and explore new applications in energy, catalysis, and environmental science. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for (Bio)Sensors Development)
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