Special Issue "Hazardous Compounds and Public Health: Programming the Future Based on Past Knowledge"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Toxicology and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (26 February 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria de Lourdes Pereira
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Sciences & CICECOAveiro, Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: biomaterials; chromium compounds and the adverse effects of some pollutants; combining histological, ultrastructural, and cell biology approaches; obesogens and natural compounds related to alleviate obesity on rats are in current studies
Prof. Bechan Sharma
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India
Interests: molecular biology of HIV-1; biochemistry; biochemical toxicology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A large number of hazardous compounds have been used in the past, and many still persist at present with harmful effects on environmental and human health. Although some of these compounds have already been banned, their residues and fate persist in the environment, which raises a constant concern for public health.

The aim of this Special Issue is to publish original research and review articles focused on the effects of hazardous compounds used in the past (e.g., POPs, chromated copper arsenate) whose residues still persist today, affecting public health. Emphasis on in vitro cell-based systems, lab animals, and humans are considered. Monitoring studies as well as reports on new and innovative strategies for their treatment aiming at a more sustainable environment are also welcome.

Dr. Maria de Lourdes Pereira
Prof. Simone Morais
Prof. Bechan Sharma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fate of contaminants in the ecosystem
  • monitoring studies
  • mechanisms of exposure
  • in vitro and in vivo studies
  • human health effects
  • suitable and promising solutions for contaminants/pollutants treatment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
The Protective Effect of Xanthohumol on the Content of Selected Elements in the Bone Tissue for Exposed Japanese Quails to TCDD
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5883; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165883 - 13 Aug 2020
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Abstract
Dioxins (including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are highly toxic and persistent chemicals widely distributed in the environment in trace amounts, and are side products of industrial and chemical processes. Exposure to dioxins leads to multiorgan morphological and functional abnormalities, including within the bone [...] Read more.
Dioxins (including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are highly toxic and persistent chemicals widely distributed in the environment in trace amounts, and are side products of industrial and chemical processes. Exposure to dioxins leads to multiorgan morphological and functional abnormalities, including within the bone tissue, disrupting its microarchitecture and mechanical properties. Xanthohumol (XN) is a chemical compound classified as a prenylated flavonoid, distinguished by multidirectional biological action. The aim of the study is to assess whether xanthohumol, as a substance with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, has the ability to eliminate the negative effects of TCDD on bone tissue. The experiment was conducted on adult Japanese quails. Two different doses of TCDD and xanthohumol were administered to birds. After euthanasia of animals, the research material in the form of cranial vault and hind limb bone was collected, and their mineral compositions of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, and iron concentrations were determined using atomic emission spectrometry in an acetylene-air flame method. Our results indicate that the administration of TCDD at a low dose causes more dynamic changes in the concentration of elements in bone, in comparison to a higher dose of dioxin. Results show also that higher doses of the XN cause the linear increase in the concentration of phosphorus and iron in the bone of the hind limb, and calcium in the bones of the cranial vault. In conclusion, our experiment shows that the use of TCDD and XN in Japanese quails together in various doses influences the content of phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, and iron in the research material. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidative Potential of Aloe vera on the Cartap and Malathion Mediated Toxicity in Wistar Rats
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5177; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145177 - 17 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 717
Abstract
Aloe vera has been the most useful medicinal herb in the world since ancient times due to its vast biological effects. The presence of high content of bioactive compounds make Aloe vera a promising complementary and alternative agent in disease prevention. The effectiveness [...] Read more.
Aloe vera has been the most useful medicinal herb in the world since ancient times due to its vast biological effects. The presence of high content of bioactive compounds make Aloe vera a promising complementary and alternative agent in disease prevention. The effectiveness of A. vera-based medicines against pesticide toxicity has never been evaluated. It was therefore envisaged to develop an A. vera-based strategy to protect the non-target animals from adverse effects of the pesticides. This article illustrates the ameliorating effect of aqueous extract (AE) of A. vera leaves against the cartap and malathion toxicity. To evaluate the protective impact of A. vera against cartap (Ctp), malathion (Mtn) and a mixture of both pesticides, the animals were divided in eight groups, each containing six rats: Group 1- C (control), Group 2- AE + C, Group 3- Ctp, Group 4- Mtn, Group 5- Ctp + Mtn, Group 6- AE + Ctp, Group 7- AE + Mtn, Group 8- AE + Ctp + Mtn. Wistar rats exposed to Ctp, Mtn and Ctp + Mtn, displayed significant change in body weight. It was observed that the WBC level increased significantly in Mtn and Ctp + Mtn challenged groups. The contents of TNF-α and IL-6 in serum increased expressively in the Ctp, Mtn and Ctp + Mtn challenged groups. Rats treated with Ctp, Mtn and Ctp + Mtn displayed significant alterations in the levels of antioxidative indices (MDA, GSH, GST, GPx, SOD and CAT). Significant alterations were recorded in the activities of AST, ALT, ACP and ALP in Ctp, Mtn and Ctp + Mtn challenged groups. The histopathological results of liver supported the biochemical data. The pre-treatment of rats with the aqueous extract of A. vera leaves significantly protected them from the toxicity of pesticides. These results suggested that A. vera extract may be used as a promising natural agent for the management of pesticide induced toxicity. Full article
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Open AccessBrief Report
Forecast of Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma Mortality in Italy up to 2040
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010160 - 28 Dec 2020
Viewed by 564
Abstract
Despite their differences, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma are frequently lumped together to describe epidemic curves and to forecast future mesothelioma trends. This study aims to describe the malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPeM) epidemic in Italy (1996–2016) and to forecast future trends up to 2040 [...] Read more.
Despite their differences, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma are frequently lumped together to describe epidemic curves and to forecast future mesothelioma trends. This study aims to describe the malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPeM) epidemic in Italy (1996–2016) and to forecast future trends up to 2040 in order to contribute to the assessment of MPeM future burden. All MPeM deaths in Italy from 1996–2016 were collected (as provided by the Italian National Statistical Institute (ISTAT)) in order to estimate MPeM mortality rates for each 3-year period from 1996 to 2016. Poisson age-period-cohort (APC) models were then used to forecast MPeM future trends. Between 2017 and 2040, 1333 MPeM deaths are expected. The number of MPeM deaths, as well as mortality rates, are expected to constantly decrease throughout the considered period. Based on considering the information from this study, it can be concluded that the MPeM epidemic has probably already reached its peak in Italy. Full article
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