Next Article in Journal
Calculations of Some Doping Nanostructurations and Patterns Improving the Functionality of High-Temperature Superconductors for Bolometer Device Applications
Next Article in Special Issue
Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Hybrid Graphene/Gold Substrates near the Percolation Threshold
Previous Article in Journal
Substitution of Ag for Cu in Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4: Toward Wide Band Gap Absorbers with Low Antisite Defects for Thin Film Solar Cells
Previous Article in Special Issue
Carbon-Based Nanomaterials in Sensors for Food Safety
Open AccessArticle

Simulations of Graphene Nanoribbon Field Effect Transistor for the Detection of Propane and Butane Gases: A First Principles Study

Thomas Johan Seebeck Department of Electronics, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 12616 Tallinn, Estonia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010098
Received: 7 December 2019 / Revised: 25 December 2019 / Accepted: 30 December 2019 / Published: 3 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for (Bio)Sensors Development)
During the last few years graphene has emerged as a potential candidate for electronics and optoelectronics applications due to its several salient features. Graphene is a smart material that responds to any physical change in its surrounding environment. Graphene has a very low intrinsic electronic noise and it can detect even a single gas molecule in its proximity. This property of graphene makes is a suitable and promising candidate to detect a large variety of organic/inorganic chemicals and gases. Typical solid state gas sensors usually requires high operating temperature and they cannot detect very low concentrations of gases efficiently due to intrinsic noise caused by thermal motion of charge carriers at high temperatures. They also have low resolution and stability issues of their constituent materials (such as electrolytes, electrodes, and sensing material itself) in harsh environments. It accelerates the need of development of robust, highly sensitive and efficient gas sensor with low operating temperature. Graphene and its derivatives could be a prospective replacement of these solid-state sensors due to their better electronic attributes for moderate temperature applications. The presence of extremely low intrinsic noise in graphene makes it highly suitable to detect a very low concentration of organic/inorganic compounds (even a single molecule ca be detected with graphene). In this article, we simulated a novel graphene nanoribbon based field effect transistor (FET) and used it to detect propane and butane gases. These are flammable household/industrial gases that must be detected to avoid serious accidents. The effects of atmospheric oxygen and humidity have also been studied by mixing oxygen and water molecules with desired target gases (propane and butane). The change in source-to-drain current of FET in the proximity of the target gases has been used as a detection signal. Our simulated FET device showed a noticeable change in density of states and IV-characteristics in the presence of target gas molecules. Nanoscale simulations of FET based gas sensor have been done in Quantumwise Atomistix Toolkit (ATK). ATK is a commercially available nanoscale semiconductor device simulator that is used to model a large variety of nanoscale devices. Our proposed device can be converted into a physical device to get a low cost and small sized integrated gas sensor. View Full-Text
Keywords: field effect transistor; graphene nanoribbon; propane; butane; gas sensor; detector; oxygen; humidity; water; nitrogen; carbon dioxide field effect transistor; graphene nanoribbon; propane; butane; gas sensor; detector; oxygen; humidity; water; nitrogen; carbon dioxide
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Rashid, M.H.; Koel, A.; Rang, T. Simulations of Graphene Nanoribbon Field Effect Transistor for the Detection of Propane and Butane Gases: A First Principles Study. Nanomaterials 2020, 10, 98.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop