Special Issue "Advances in Nanomaterials in Biomedicine"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Elena I. Ryabchikova
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ICBFM SB RAS), Russia,
Interests: multilevel nanoconstructions; mechanisms of nanoparticles interaction with a cell; nucleic acid delivery; spheroid model; electron microscopy; antimicrobial peptides; cell ultrastructure

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The Special Issue “Advances in Nanomaterials in Biomedicine” is addressed to investigators working on the application of nanomaterials in biomedicine. What is biomedicine? Apparently, everyone intuitively understands when trying to pinpoint this area of knowledge that an absence of clarity is to be expected. Memidex online dictionary defines biomedicine as “a branch of medical science that applies biological and physiological principles to clinical practice”, and gives 10 more definitions that do not make the subject of biomedicine clearer.

The very broad definition of biomedicine means that this Special Issue covers a variety of nanotechnology applications in experimental and preclinical studies destined for medicine. Research articles and reviews are invited to “Advances in Nanomaterials in Biomedicine” Special Issue to gather information about achievements in various fields of nanotechnology connected to different  branches of biomedicine. We hope that this Special Issue will serve as a kind of multidisciplinary congress, allowing one to discuss developments in the field of nanomaterial application in biomedical research, including but not limited to the following:   

  • New approaches using nanomaterials to diagnose various disease, including cancer and infections;
  • The use of nanomaterials to improve the preservation and storage duration of medical preparations;
  • Nanomaterials providing targeted delivery of medical preparations;
  • Nanomaterials in tissue engineering and prosthetics;
  • Nanomaterials to improve patient care, new effective antimicrobial agents.

Prof. Elena I. Ryabchikova
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanotechnology
  • Biocompatible nanomaterials
  • Diagnostics
  • Storage of medicines
  • Targeted drug delivery
  • Nanomedicine
  • Nanocarriers
  • Tissue engineering.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
rAAV-Mediated Overexpression of SOX9 and TGF-β via Carbon Dot-Guided Vector Delivery Enhances the Biological Activities in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 855; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050855 - 28 Apr 2020
Abstract
Scaffold-assisted gene therapy is a highly promising tool to treat articular cartilage lesions upon direct delivery of chondrogenic candidate sequences. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility and benefits of providing highly chondroreparative agents, the cartilage-specific sex-determining region Y-type high-mobility [...] Read more.
Scaffold-assisted gene therapy is a highly promising tool to treat articular cartilage lesions upon direct delivery of chondrogenic candidate sequences. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility and benefits of providing highly chondroreparative agents, the cartilage-specific sex-determining region Y-type high-mobility group 9 (SOX9) transcription factor or the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) via clinically adapted, independent recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors formulated with carbon dots (CDs), a novel class of carbon-dominated nanomaterials. Effective complexation and release of a reporter rAAV-lacZ vector was achieved using four different CDs elaborated from 1-citric acid and pentaethylenehexamine (CD-1); 2-citric acid, poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (MW 550 Da), and N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (CD-2); 3-citric acid, branched poly(ethylenimine) (MW 600 Da), and poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (MW 2 kDa) (CD-3); and 4-citric acid and branched poly(ethylenimine) (MW 600 Da) (CD-4), allowing for the genetic modification of hMSCs. Among the nanoparticles, CD-2 showed an optimal ability for rAAV delivery (up to 2.2-fold increase in lacZ expression relative to free vector treatment with 100% cell viability for at least 10 days, the longest time point examined). Administration of therapeutic (SOX9, TGF-β) rAAV vectors in hMSCs via CD-2 led to the effective overexpression of each independent transgene, promoting enhanced cell proliferation (TGF-β) and cartilage matrix deposition (glycosaminoglycans, type-II collagen) for at least 21 days relative to control treatments (CD-2 lacking rAAV or associated to rAAV-lacZ), while advantageously restricting undesirable type-I and -X collagen deposition. These results reveal the potential of CD-guided rAAV gene administration in hMSCs as safe, non-invasive systems for translational strategies to enhance cartilage repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanomaterials in Biomedicine)
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