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Special Issue "Biogenic Nanomaterials: Versatility and Applications"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Clayton Jeffryes

Nanobiomaterials and Bioprocessing (NAB) Laboratory, Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Nanoparticles; Diatoms; Nanotechnology; Bioprocess; Phototrophs
Guest Editor
Dr. Si Amar Dahoumane

Yachay Tech, School of Geological Sciences and Engineering, Yachay, Ecuador
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Synthesis; Nanomaterials; Sustainability; Microalgae; Bioreactors; Bio-applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last two decades have witnessed the fast growth of greener methodologies for the synthesis of different biogenically synthesized inorganic nanoparticles (NPs), nanomaterials and structures. These NPs may belong to various families, such as metallic, oxides and chalcogenides. Owing to the richness of the utilised resources, namely plants, fungi, bacteria and algae, their method of preparation and use, and the fine tuning of the experimental parameters, materials scientists have demonstrated the power and the versatility of these sustainable routes by controlling the features of the as-synthesized NPs, such as the shape, the size and the composition. These features are confirmed using several techniques of characterization, such as microscopies and spectroscopies. Besides being scalable and generally requiring benign, environmentally friendly process inputs and process conditions near ambient temperatures and pressures, these routes lead to the production of valuable nanomaterials possessing unique properties that may find applications in different fields, such as medicine and catalysis to name a few.

To this end, we extend this invitation to submit innovative research articles and reviews on subjects pertaining to biologically synthesized nanomaterials, structures or particles, their synthesis or scalable production methods, demonstrations of biogenic nanomaterial applications, or life cycle analysis.

Dr. Clayton Jeffryes
Dr. Si Amar Dahoumane
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access bimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosynthesis
  • Nanoparticles
  • Bioresources
  • Nanotechnology
  • Green Chemistry
  • Scalability
  • Bioprocess
  • Phototroph

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Biosynthetic Conversion of Ag+ to highly Stable Ag0 Nanoparticles by Wild Type and Cell Wall Deficient Strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii
Received: 8 December 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 25 December 2018 / Published: 28 December 2018
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Abstract
In the current study, two different strains of the green, freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii bioreduced Ag+ to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which have applications in biosensors, biomaterials, and therapeutic and diagnostic tools. The bioreduction takes place in cell cultures of C. reinhardtii at
[...] Read more.
In the current study, two different strains of the green, freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii bioreduced Ag+ to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which have applications in biosensors, biomaterials, and therapeutic and diagnostic tools. The bioreduction takes place in cell cultures of C. reinhardtii at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, thus eliminating the need for specialized equipment, harmful reducing agents or the generation of toxic byproducts. In addition to the visual changes in the cell culture, the production of AgNPs was confirmed by the characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the range of 415–425 nm using UV-Vis spectrophotometry and further evolution of the SPR peaks were studied by comparing the peak intensity at maximum absorbance over time. X-ray diffraction (XRD) determined that the NPs were Ag0. Micrographs from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that 97 ± 2% AgNPs were <10 nm in diameter. Ag+ to AgNP conversion was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The AgNPs were stable over time in the cell culture media, acetone, NaCl and reagent alcohol solutions. This was verified by a negligible change in the features of the SPR band after t > 300 days of storage at 4 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogenic Nanomaterials: Versatility and Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Applications of Magnetotactic Bacteria, Magnetosomes and Magnetosome Crystals in Biotechnology and Nanotechnology: Mini-Review
Molecules 2018, 23(10), 2438; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102438
Received: 28 August 2018 / Revised: 17 September 2018 / Accepted: 20 September 2018 / Published: 24 September 2018
PDF Full-text (10529 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) biomineralize magnetosomes, which are defined as intracellular nanocrystals of the magnetic minerals magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) enveloped by a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The synthesis of magnetosomes is controlled by a specific
[...] Read more.
Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) biomineralize magnetosomes, which are defined as intracellular nanocrystals of the magnetic minerals magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) enveloped by a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The synthesis of magnetosomes is controlled by a specific set of genes that encode proteins, some of which are exclusively found in the magnetosome membrane in the cell. Over the past several decades, interest in nanoscale technology (nanotechnology) and biotechnology has increased significantly due to the development and establishment of new commercial, medical and scientific processes and applications that utilize nanomaterials, some of which are biologically derived. One excellent example of a biological nanomaterial that is showing great promise for use in a large number of commercial and medical applications are bacterial magnetite magnetosomes. Unlike chemically-synthesized magnetite nanoparticles, magnetosome magnetite crystals are stable single-magnetic domains and are thus permanently magnetic at ambient temperature, are of high chemical purity, and display a narrow size range and consistent crystal morphology. These physical/chemical features are important in their use in biotechnological and other applications. Applications utilizing magnetite-producing MTB, magnetite magnetosomes and/or magnetosome magnetite crystals include and/or involve bioremediation, cell separation, DNA/antigen recovery or detection, drug delivery, enzyme immobilization, magnetic hyperthermia and contrast enhancement of magnetic resonance imaging. Metric analysis using Scopus and Web of Science databases from 2003 to 2018 showed that applied research involving magnetite from MTB in some form has been focused mainly in biomedical applications, particularly in magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogenic Nanomaterials: Versatility and Applications)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview Application of Plant Viruses as a Biotemplate for Nanomaterial Fabrication
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2311; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092311
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 1 September 2018 / Accepted: 4 September 2018 / Published: 11 September 2018
PDF Full-text (2950 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Viruses are widely used to fabricate nanomaterials in the field of nanotechnology. Plant viruses are of great interest to the nanotechnology field because of their symmetry, polyvalency, homogeneous size distribution, and ability to self-assemble. This homogeneity can be used to obtain the high
[...] Read more.
Viruses are widely used to fabricate nanomaterials in the field of nanotechnology. Plant viruses are of great interest to the nanotechnology field because of their symmetry, polyvalency, homogeneous size distribution, and ability to self-assemble. This homogeneity can be used to obtain the high uniformity of the templated material and its related properties. In this paper, the variety of nanomaterials generated in rod-like and spherical plant viruses is highlighted for the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), brome mosaic virus (BMV), and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Their recent studies on developing nanomaterials in a wide range of applications from biomedicine and catalysts to biosensors are reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogenic Nanomaterials: Versatility and Applications)
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