Special Issue "Virulence and Resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Aida Duarte
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade de Lisboa, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: biochemistry, environmental exposures; microbiology; antibiotics; bacterial virulence
Prof. Dr. Cátia Caneiras
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Microbiology Research Laboratory in Environmental Health (EnviHealthMicro Lab), Institute of Environmental Health (ISAMB), Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
2. Institute of Preventive Medicine and Public Health (IMP&SP), University of Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
3. Microbiology and Immunology Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: Klebsiella pneumoniae complex; Gram-negative pathogens; Enterobacteriacea; virulence factors; antimicrobial resistance; extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL); carbapenemases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family, which is frequently associated with severe healthcare-associated infections (HAI) as well as community-acquired infections. It can cause different types of infection such as pneumonia, urinary tract infection, skin or soft tissue infection, meningitis, pyogenic liver abscess, and bacteremia potentially developing into sepsis. It is believed that the gastrointestinal tract is the most important reservoir for the transmission of K. pneumoniae. However, in contrast to many other bacterial pathogens, K. pneumoniae is ubiquitous in nature, and environmental reservoirs can also have a relevant role in human infections. Infections resulting from multidrug-resistant (MDR), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), and/or carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae strains are a challenge due to the lack of vaccines and therapeutic options. Several virulence factors, such as adherence and invasion factors, toxins, capsules, and siderophores, can be involved in the pathogenic mechanisms, namely, invasion of the host, disease induction, and the evasion of host defenses. The coexistence of antimicrobial resistance genes with other advantageous determinants such as virulence factors can have a significant impact on bacterial pathogenicity. Moreover, recent population diversity studies have shown that K. pneumoniae is in fact part of a complex of species. The aim of this Special Issue is to give an updated insight into K. pneumonia-complex resistance and virulence determinants, and the interplay of these factors. For this purpose, we welcome the submission of research articles, review articles, and short communications related to the various aspects of K. pneumonia-complex infection, with particular emphasis on antimicrobial resistance, its transmissibility, molecular pathways, the coexistence of virulence factors, biomarkers, clinical and environmental reservoirs, high-risk clones, whole genome sequencing characterization, in vivo infection models, and bacterial pathogenicity.

Prof. Dr. Aida Duarte
Prof. Dr. Cátia Caneiras
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Klebsiella pneumoniae complex
  • virulence factors
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL)
  • carbapenemase producers
  • molecular epidemiology
  • bacterial pathogenicity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Genomic Epidemiology of Carbapenemase Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains at a Northern Portuguese Hospital Enables the Detection of a Misidentified Klebsiella variicola KPC-3 Producing Strain
Microorganisms 2020, 8(12), 1986; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121986 - 13 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 735
Abstract
The evolutionary epidemiology, resistome, virulome and mobilome of thirty-one multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates from the northern Vila Real region of Portugal were characterized using whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. The genomic population structure was dominated by two main sequence types (STs): [...] Read more.
The evolutionary epidemiology, resistome, virulome and mobilome of thirty-one multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates from the northern Vila Real region of Portugal were characterized using whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. The genomic population structure was dominated by two main sequence types (STs): ST147 (n = 17; 54.8%) and ST15 (n = 6; 19.4%) comprising four distinct genomic clusters. Two main carbapenemase coding genes were detected (blaKPC-3 and blaOXA-48) along with additional extended-spectrum β-lactamase coding loci (blaCTX-M-15, blaSHV-12, blaSHV-27, and blaSHV-187). Moreover, whole genome sequencing enabled the identification of one Klebsiella variicola KPC-3 producer isolate previously misidentified as K. pneumoniae, which in addition to the blaKPC-3 carbapenemase gene, bore the chromosomal broad spectrum β-lactamase blaLEN-2 coding gene, oqxAB and fosA resistance loci. The blaKPC-3 genes were located in a Tn4401b transposon (K. variicolan = 1; K. pneumoniaen = 2) and Tn4401d isoform (K. pneumoniaen = 28). Overall, our work describes the first report of a blaKPC-3 producing K. variicola, as well as the detection of this species during infection control measures in surveillance cultures from infected patients. It also highlights the importance of additional control measures to overcome the clonal dissemination of carbapenemase producing clones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virulence and Resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae)
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Review

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Review
From Klebsiella pneumoniae Colonization to Dissemination: An Overview of Studies Implementing Murine Models
Microorganisms 2021, 9(6), 1282; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061282 - 12 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 903
Abstract
Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for community-acquired and nosocomial infections. The strains of this species belong to the opportunistic group, which is comprised of the multidrug-resistant strains, or the hypervirulent group, depending on their accessory genome, which determines bacterial pathogenicity and [...] Read more.
Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for community-acquired and nosocomial infections. The strains of this species belong to the opportunistic group, which is comprised of the multidrug-resistant strains, or the hypervirulent group, depending on their accessory genome, which determines bacterial pathogenicity and the host immune response. The aim of this survey is to present an overview of the murine models mimicking K. pneumoniae infectious processes (i.e., gastrointestinal colonization, urinary, pulmonary, and systemic infections), and the bacterial functions deployed to colonize and disseminate into the host. These in vivo approaches are pivotal to develop new therapeutics to limit K. pneumoniae infections via a modulation of the immune responses and/or microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virulence and Resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae)
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Other

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Case Report
Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae of Lineage ST66-K2 Caused Tonsillopharyngitis in a German Patient
Microorganisms 2021, 9(1), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9010133 - 08 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 945
Abstract
Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKp) is a novel pathotype that has been rarely described in Europe. This study characterizes a hvKp isolate that caused a community-acquired infection. The hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) strain 18-0005 was obtained from a German patient with [...] Read more.
Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKp) is a novel pathotype that has been rarely described in Europe. This study characterizes a hvKp isolate that caused a community-acquired infection. The hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) strain 18-0005 was obtained from a German patient with tonsillopharyngitis in 2017. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed and the genome was sequenced by Illumina and Nanopore technology. Whole genome data were analyzed by conducting core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Virulence genes were predicted by applying Kleborate. Phenotypic and whole genome analyses revealed a high similarity of the study isolate 18-0005 to the recently reported antibiotic-susceptible hvKp isolate SB5881 from France and the “ancestral” strain Kp52.145; both were assigned to the ST66-K2 lineage. Comparative genomic analysis of the three plasmids showed that the 18-0005 plasmid II differs from SB5881 plasmid II by an additional 3 kb integrated fragment of plasmid I. Our findings demonstrate the genetic flexibility of hvKp and the occurrence of a strain of the clonal group CG66-K2 in Germany. Hence, it emphasizes the need to improve clinical awareness and infection monitoring of hvKp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virulence and Resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae)
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