Cyano-Microbial Interactions: Envisioning the Cyanosphere

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2023) | Viewed by 5335

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. IPMA, I.P.-Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, Lisbon, Portugal
2. CIIMAR-Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, Matosinhos, Portugal
Interests: microlagae; cyanobacteria; toxins; harmful algal blooms; virus

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Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4069-007 Porto, Portugal
2. CIIMAR/CIMAR, Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos, s/n, 4450-208 Porto, Portugal
Interests: cyanobacteria; toxins; cyanotoxins; marine biotechnology; secondary metabolites; cyanobacterial blooms; ecotoxicology; environmental contamination
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacteria are ever-present organisms, flourishing and surviving virtually in any habitat. The cyanosphere is frequently mentioned in regard to the bacterial consortia of biocrust soil cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria from several ecological niches also have prolific microbiomes interacting with them. Furthermore, cyano-microbial interactions encompass the entire range of ecological relationships from mutualism and commensalism to predation, competition, and parasitism. These relationships have important impacts in ecosystem dynamics, nutrient recycling, and food web structures. The aim of this Special Issue is to collect high-quality research to provide an overview of the state of the art in this field in order to increase our understanding of the microbial social life of cyanobacteria. All aspects of microbes interacting with cyanobacteria in any environment are welcome.

The following topics will be considered, among others:

  • Cyanobacteria pathogens, parasites, and viruses;
  • Cyanobacterial host–virus interactions and cyanophages;
  • Bacterial predation on cyanobacteria and cyanolytic bacteria;
  • Cyanobacteria symbionts;
  • Cyanobacteria/microbial exchanges and associations;
  • Cyanobacteria/bacterial segregation;
  • Cyanobacterial toxin degrading bacteria;
  • Cyanobacteria blooms and microbes;
  • Cyanobacterial biocrusts and biofilms;
  • Microbial diversity in cyanobacteria cultures;
  • Cyanobacteria microbiome diversity.

Dr. Catarina I. Churro
Dr. Vitor Vasconcelos
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • bacteriophage
  • cyanophages
  • phagues
  • virus
  • fungus
  • chytrids
  • cyanolytic
  • ‎rhizosphere
  • quorum sensing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2616 KiB  
Article
Abundant Cyanobacteria in Autumn Adhering to the Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) in Shanghai
by Changliang Nie, Xueyun Geng, Runqi Zhang, Lina Wang, Ling Li and Jianmin Chen
Microorganisms 2023, 11(7), 1835; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11071835 - 19 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1304
Abstract
Cyanobacteria are ever-present, mainly flourishing in aquatic environments and surviving virtually in other habitats. The microbiota of indoor dust on the pre-filter of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, which reflect indoor microbial contamination and affect human health, has attracted attention. Contemporary studies [...] Read more.
Cyanobacteria are ever-present, mainly flourishing in aquatic environments and surviving virtually in other habitats. The microbiota of indoor dust on the pre-filter of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, which reflect indoor microbial contamination and affect human health, has attracted attention. Contemporary studies on cyanobacteria deposited on the pre-filter of HVAC remain scant. By the culture-independent approach of qPCR and high throughput sequencing technologies, our results documented that the cyanobacterial concentrations were highest in autumn, occurred recurrently, and were about 2.60 and 10.57-fold higher than those in winter and summer. We proposed that aquatic and terrestrial cyanobacteria contributed to the pre-filter of HVAC by airborne transportation produced by wave breaks, bubble bursts, and soil surface by wind force, owing to the evidence that cyanobacteria were commonly detected in airborne particulate matters. The cyanobacteria community structure was characterized in Shanghai, where Chroococcidiopsaceae, norank_cyanobacteriales, Nostocaceae, Paraspirulinaceae, and others dominated the dust on the pre-filter of HVAC. Some detected genera, including Nodularia sp., Pseudanabaena sp., and Leptolyngbya sp., potentially produced cyanobacterial toxins, which need further studying to determine their potential threat to human health. The present work shed new insight into cyanobacteria distribution in the specific environment besides aquatic habitats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyano-Microbial Interactions: Envisioning the Cyanosphere)
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12 pages, 1707 KiB  
Article
Impact of Ascorbic Acid on Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticle and UV-B Mediated Stress in the Cyanobacterium, Fremyella diplosiphon
by LaDonna Wyatt, Samson Gichuki, Yavuz S. Yalcin and Viji Sitther
Microorganisms 2023, 11(5), 1245; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11051245 - 9 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1398
Abstract
Fremyella diplosiphon is an ideal third-generation biofuel source due to its ability to produce transesterified lipids. While nanofer 25s zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVIs) improve lipid production, an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular defense can be catastrophic to the organism. In [...] Read more.
Fremyella diplosiphon is an ideal third-generation biofuel source due to its ability to produce transesterified lipids. While nanofer 25s zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVIs) improve lipid production, an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular defense can be catastrophic to the organism. In the present study, the effect of ascorbic acid on nZVI and UV-induced stress in F. diplosiphon strain B481-SD was investigated, and lipid profiles in the combination regimen of nZVIs and ascorbic acid compared. Comparison of F. diplosiphon growth in BG11 media amended with 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mM ascorbic acid indicated 6 mM to be optimal for the growth of B481-SD. Further, growth in 6 mM ascorbic acid combined with 3.2 mg/L nZVIs was significantly higher when compared to the combination regimen of 12.8 and 51.2 mg/L of nZVIs and 6 mM ascorbic acid. The reversal effect of UV-B radiation for 30 min and 1 h indicated that ascorbic acid restored B481-SD growth. Transesterified lipids characterized by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry indicated C16 hexadecanoate to be the most abundant fatty acid methyl ester in the combination regimen of 6 mM ascorbic acid and 12.8 mg/L nZVI-treated F. diplosiphon. These findings were supported by microscopic observations in which cellular degradation was observed in B481-SD cells treated with 6 mM ascorbic acid and 12.8 mg/L nZVIs. Our results indicate that ascorbic acid counteracts the damaging effect of oxidative stress produced by nZVIs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyano-Microbial Interactions: Envisioning the Cyanosphere)
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15 pages, 1132 KiB  
Article
A Cyanophage MarR-Type Transcription Factor Regulates Host RNase E Expression during Infection
by S. Joke Lambrecht, Nils Stappert, Frederik Sommer, Michael Schroda and Claudia Steglich
Microorganisms 2022, 10(11), 2245; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10112245 - 13 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1648
Abstract
The marine picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to global primary production, and its abundance and diversity is shaped in part by viral infection. Here, we identified a cyanophage-encoded MarR-type transcription factor that induces the gene expression of host Prochlorococcus MED4 endoribonuclease (RNase) E during [...] Read more.
The marine picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to global primary production, and its abundance and diversity is shaped in part by viral infection. Here, we identified a cyanophage-encoded MarR-type transcription factor that induces the gene expression of host Prochlorococcus MED4 endoribonuclease (RNase) E during phage infection. The increase in rne transcript levels relies on the phage (p)MarR-mediated activation of an alternative promoter that gives rise to a truncated yet enzymatically fully functional RNase E isoform. In this study, we demonstrate that pMarR binds to an atypical activator site downstream of the transcriptional start site and that binding is enhanced in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Furthermore, we show that dimeric pMarR interacts with the α subunit of RNA polymerase, and we identified amino acid residues S66, R67, and G106, which are important for Ca2+ binding, DNA binding, and dimerization of pMarR, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyano-Microbial Interactions: Envisioning the Cyanosphere)
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