Special Issue "Molecular Mechanisms of Fungal Virulence and Commensalism"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Steffen Rupp

Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Human fungal pathogens;Host-pathogen Interaction;Next Generation Sequencing;Proteomics methodologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Infectious diseases remain one of the most prevalent health threats worldwide. In the Western world especially opportunistic infections are on the rise. Particularly, in cases of immune deficiencies opportunistic fungal infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients, mostly due to inefficient diagnosis and treatment regimens. Notably, fungal diseases cause annual healthcare costs exceeding double-digit billions in USA and Europe. Hence, fungal infections represent a major socio-economic and clinical problem worldwide, and remain a high priority challenge for global healthcare provision.

Several new concepts for a better understanding and treatment of fungal disease have been developed recently. This includes a better understanding of the key mechanisms of host-pathogen interaction, both on the host and pathogen side. Particularly mechanisms of the innate immune system against fungal infections, as well as the immune evasion strategies of the fungal invader and the switch from a commensal behavior to invasive disease have been studied in great detail. In addition the role of the microbiome has been recognized and its function in the context of fungal disease has been analyzed recently. These studies have opened the door for new concepts in prevention and treatment of fungal infections. This is supported by the development of new diagnostic concepts based on Next Generation Sequencing technologies or novel biomarkers, which are currently in development for clinical application.

In this Special Issue of Microorganisms, we invite you to send contributions concerning all aspects related to molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interaction in fungal disease. This includes contributions to host mechanisms of defense, as well as fungal evasion strategies, including the microbiome and its effects on fungal colonization and disease development. New concepts in diagnostics of fungal disease and in the development of new antifungals are appreciated as well.

Prof. Dr. Steffen Rupp
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Opportunistic Fungal Infections
  • Host-pathogen interaction
  • Candida
  • Colonization
  • Cell wall
  • Virulence factors
  • Microbiome
  • Innate Immunity
  • Immune Receptors
  • Cytokines

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview Candida glabrata: A Lot More Than Meets the Eye
Microorganisms 2019, 7(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020039
Received: 19 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 30 January 2019
PDF Full-text (1969 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that causes superficial mucosal and life-threatening bloodstream infections in individuals with a compromised immune system. Evolutionarily, it is closer to the non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae than to the most prevalent Candida bloodstream pathogen, C. albicans [...] Read more.
Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that causes superficial mucosal and life-threatening bloodstream infections in individuals with a compromised immune system. Evolutionarily, it is closer to the non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae than to the most prevalent Candida bloodstream pathogen, C. albicans. C. glabrata is a haploid budding yeast that predominantly reproduces clonally. In this review, we summarize interactions of C. glabrata with the host immune, epithelial and endothelial cells, and the ingenious strategies it deploys to acquire iron and phosphate from the external environment. We outline various attributes including cell surface-associated adhesins and aspartyl proteases, biofilm formation and stress response mechanisms, that contribute to the virulence of C. glabrata. We further discuss how, C. glabrata, despite lacking morphological switching and secreted proteolytic activity, is able to disarm macrophage, dampen the host inflammatory immune response and replicate intracellularly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Fungal Virulence and Commensalism)
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