Campylobacter: Current Status and Future Challenges

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 7771

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Microbiology and Food Biocatalysis Group, Department of Biotechnology and Food Microbiology, Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL, CSIC-UAM), C/Nicolás Cabrera, 9. Cantoblanco Campus, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: foodborne pathogens; antimicrobial agents; food by-products; food bioactive compounds; food control
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Guest Editor
Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias de la Alimentación (CIAL) (CSIC-UAM). C/ Nicolás Cabrera, 9, Campus de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: foodborne pathogens; food safety; antibiotic resistance; natural antimicrobial compounds; biofilms; Campylobacter spp.; Helicobacter pylori
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For several years, the foodborne pathogen Campylobacter has been the leading cause of bacterial diarrheal disease worldwide. Campylobacters occur in the gut of many species of bird and poultry and appear to be particularly well adapted to this habitat. Infections by Campylobacter in humans are generally caused by consuming contaminated foods of animal origin, with poultry, especially chicken, being the main reservoir, although Campylobacter has also been found in cattle, swine, sheep, wild birds, and pets. In the 21st century, despite the efforts made in improving hygiene and control procedures, the persistence of Campylobacter along food chain affects the general goal of reducing campylobacteriosis incidence. As Guest Editors of this Special Issue, we look forward to receiving and reviewing your contributions to this topic. We encourage the submission of manuscripts focused on hot topics such as strategies to reduce human infection, intervention strategies at food chain, antibiotic resistance, new antimicrobial alternatives, biofilm formation and control, and virulence attributes of Campylobacter species.

Dr. Jose Manuel Silvan
Dr. Adolfo J. Martinez-Rodriguez
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Campylobacter
  • Campylobacteriosis
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • biofilms
  • new antimicrobials
  • virulence attributes
  • control strategies
  • food safety

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 779 KiB  
Article
Phylogenetic Analysis Reveals Source Attribution Patterns for Campylobacter spp. in Tennessee and Pennsylvania
by Lauren K. Hudson, William E. Andershock, Runan Yan, Mugdha Golwalkar, Nkuchia M. M’ikanatha, Irving Nachamkin, Linda S. Thomas, Christina Moore, Xiaorong Qian, Richard Steece, Katie N. Garman, John R. Dunn, Jasna Kovac and Thomas G. Denes
Microorganisms 2021, 9(11), 2300; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9112300 - 5 Nov 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3814
Abstract
Campylobacteriosis is the most common bacterial foodborne illness in the United States and is frequently associated with foods of animal origin. The goals of this study were to compare clinical and non-clinical Campylobacter populations from Tennessee (TN) and Pennsylvania (PA), use phylogenetic relatedness [...] Read more.
Campylobacteriosis is the most common bacterial foodborne illness in the United States and is frequently associated with foods of animal origin. The goals of this study were to compare clinical and non-clinical Campylobacter populations from Tennessee (TN) and Pennsylvania (PA), use phylogenetic relatedness to assess source attribution patterns, and identify potential outbreak clusters. Campylobacter isolates studied (n = 3080) included TN clinical isolates collected and sequenced for routine surveillance, PA clinical isolates collected from patients at the University of Pennsylvania Health System facilities, and non-clinical isolates from both states for which sequencing reads were available on NCBI. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted to categorize isolates into species groups and determine the population structure of each species. Most isolates were C. jejuni (n = 2132, 69.2%) and C. coli (n = 921, 29.9%), while the remaining were C. lari (0.4%), C. upsaliensis (0.3%), and C. fetus (0.1%). The C. jejuni group consisted of three clades; most non-clinical isolates were of poultry (62.7%) or cattle (35.8%) origin, and 59.7 and 16.5% of clinical isolates were in subclades associated with poultry or cattle, respectively. The C. coli isolates grouped into two clades; most non-clinical isolates were from poultry (61.2%) or swine (29.0%) sources, and 74.5, 9.2, and 6.1% of clinical isolates were in subclades associated with poultry, cattle, or swine, respectively. Based on genomic similarity, we identified 42 C. jejuni and one C. coli potential outbreak clusters. The C. jejuni clusters contained 188 clinical isolates, 19.6% of the total C. jejuni clinical isolates, suggesting that a larger proportion of campylobacteriosis may be associated with outbreaks than previously determined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Campylobacter: Current Status and Future Challenges)
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13 pages, 918 KiB  
Article
An Investigation into the Critical Factors Influencing the Spread of Campylobacter during Chicken Handling in Commercial Kitchens in China
by Honggang Lai, Yuanyue Tang, Fangzhe Ren, Zeng Li, Fengming Li, Chaoyue Cui, Xinan Jiao and Jinlin Huang
Microorganisms 2021, 9(6), 1164; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061164 - 28 May 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2378
Abstract
Campylobacteriosis is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Consumption of chicken meat is considered the main route for human infection with Campylobacter. This study aimed to determine the critical factors for Campylobacter cross-contamination in Chinese commercial kitchens during chicken handling. [...] Read more.
Campylobacteriosis is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Consumption of chicken meat is considered the main route for human infection with Campylobacter. This study aimed to determine the critical factors for Campylobacter cross-contamination in Chinese commercial kitchens during chicken handling. Five commercial kitchens were visited to detect Campylobacter occurrence from 2019 to 2020. Chicken samples (n = 363) and cotton balls from the kitchen surfaces (n = 479) were collected, and total bacterial counts and Campylobacter spp. were detected. Genotypic characterization of 57 Campylobacter jejuni isolates was performed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In total, 77.41% of chicken carcass samples and 37.37% of kitchen surfaces showed Campylobacter spp. contamination. Before chicken preparation, Campylobacter spp. were already present in the kitchen environment; however, chicken handling significantly increased Campylobacter spp. prevalence (p < 0.05). After cleaning, boards, hands, and knives still showed high bacterial loads including Campylobacter spp., which related to poor sanitary conditions and ineffective handling practices. Poor sanitation conditions on kitchen surfaces offer greater opportunities for Campylobacter transmission. Molecular typing by MLST revealed that Campylobacter cross-contamination occurred during chicken preparation. The most prevalent sequence types, ST693 and ST45, showed strong biofilm formation ability. Consequently, sanitary condition of surfaces and biofilm formation ability of isolates were the critical points contributing to spread of Campylobacter in kitchen environment. These results provide insight into potential targeted control strategies along the farm-to-plate chain and highlight the necessity for improvements in sanitary conditions. The implementation of more effective cleaning measures should be considered to decrease the campylobacteriosis risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Campylobacter: Current Status and Future Challenges)
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