Bartonella and Bartonellosis: New Advances and Further Challenges

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 20839

Special Issue Editors

The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, Austin, MN 55912, USA
Interests: vector-borne disease; bartonella infection; biofilms; single- and multi-photon microscopy; second harmonic generation microscopy; skin biology; COVID
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Duluth Campus, Medical School, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN 55812, USA
Interests: RNA; bartonella henselae; bacillary angiomatosis; cancer microbiome; tRNA fragments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The genus Bartonella is comprised of fastidious Gram-negative, slow-growing, and facultative intracellular bacteria belonging to the Alpha-2 subgroup of the class Proteobacteria, and the order Rhizobiales. These microorganisms are most often transmitted to humans through animal bites or scratches (cats, dogs, and other animals), by scratch inoculation of infected flea or body louse feces into the skin, and potentially, by bites of other vectors including ants, biting flies, keds, mites, spiders, and ticks. Currently, at least 40 Bartonella species or subspecies have been characterize, of which 17 Bartonella species have been implicated in association with zoonotic infections in humans. These bacteria have become globally important, but medically underappreciated emerging pathogens impacting animal and human health. An infectious disease produced by bacteria of the genus Bartonella is called Bartonellosis and includes Carrion’s disease, cat-scratch disease, chronic lymphadenopathy, trench fever, chronic bacteraemia, culture-negative endocarditis, bacilliary angiomatosis, bacilliary peliosis, vasculitis, and uveitis.

In this Special Issue, I invite reviews or original research articles related to Bartonella and Bartonellosis with a special emphasis on pathogenic mechanisms, prevalence values and findings in diagnostic settings, and signs and symptoms of infection.

Dr. Marna Ericson
Prof. Dr. Lynne T. Bemis
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • bartonella
  • animal and human bartonellosis
  • zoonosis
  • transmission
  • medicine
  • one health, biofilms
  • RNA
  • imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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53 pages, 1492 KiB  
Article
Comparison of the Efficacy of Longer versus Shorter Pulsed High Dose Dapsone Combination Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Lyme Disease/Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome with Bartonellosis and Associated Coinfections
by , and
Microorganisms 2023, 11(9), 2301; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11092301 - 12 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Twenty-five patients with relapsing and remitting Borreliosis, Babesiosis, and bartonellosis despite extended anti-infective therapy were prescribed double-dose dapsone combination therapy (DDDCT), followed by one or several courses of High Dose Dapsone Combination Therapy (HDDCT). A retrospective chart review of these 25 patients undergoing [...] Read more.
Twenty-five patients with relapsing and remitting Borreliosis, Babesiosis, and bartonellosis despite extended anti-infective therapy were prescribed double-dose dapsone combination therapy (DDDCT), followed by one or several courses of High Dose Dapsone Combination Therapy (HDDCT). A retrospective chart review of these 25 patients undergoing DDDCT therapy and HDDCT demonstrated that 100% improved their tick-borne symptoms, and patients completing 6–7 day pulses of HDDCT had superior levels of improvement versus 4-day pulses if Bartonella was present. At the completion of treatment, 7/23 (30.5%) who completed 8 weeks of DDDCT followed by a 5–7 day pulse of HDDCT remained in remission for 3–9 months, and 3/23 patients (13%) who recently finished treatment were 1 ½ months in full remission. In conclusion, DDDCT followed by 6–7 day pulses of HDDCT could represent a novel, effective anti-infective strategy in chronic Lyme disease/Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) and associated co-infections, including Bartonella, especially in individuals who have failed standard antibiotic protocols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bartonella and Bartonellosis: New Advances and Further Challenges)
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11 pages, 3366 KiB  
Case Report
Bartonella- and Borrelia-Related Disease Presenting as a Neurological Condition Revealing the Need for Better Diagnostics
Microorganisms 2024, 12(1), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12010209 - 19 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The diagnostic tests available to identify vector-borne pathogens have major limitations. Clinicians must consider an assortment of often diverse symptoms to decide what pathogen or pathogens to suspect and test for. Even then, there are limitations to the currently available indirect detection methods, [...] Read more.
The diagnostic tests available to identify vector-borne pathogens have major limitations. Clinicians must consider an assortment of often diverse symptoms to decide what pathogen or pathogens to suspect and test for. Even then, there are limitations to the currently available indirect detection methods, such as serology, or direct detection methods such as molecular tests with or without culture enrichment. Bartonella spp., which are considered stealth pathogens, are particularly difficult to detect and diagnose. We present a case report of a patient who experienced a spider bite followed by myalgia, lymphadenopathy, and trouble sleeping. She did not test positive for Bartonella spp. through clinically available testing. Her symptoms progressed and she was told she needed a double hip replacement. Prior to the surgery, her blood was submitted for novel molecular testing, where Bartonella spp. was confirmed, and a spirochete was also detected. Additional testing using novel methods over a period of five years found Bartonella henselae and Borrelia burgdorferi in her blood. This patient’s case is an example of why new diagnostic methods for vector-borne pathogens are urgently needed and why new knowledge of the variable manifestations of Bartonellosis need to be provided to the medical community to inform and heighten their index of suspicion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bartonella and Bartonellosis: New Advances and Further Challenges)
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