Special Issue "Gas Flows in Microsystems"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "A:Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Stéphane Colin

Université de Toulouse, Institut Clément Ader, 3 rue Caroline Aigle, 31400 Toulouse, France
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +33 (0) 5 61 17 10 95
Interests: microfluidics; gas microflows; fluidic microsystems; microscale heat transfer
Guest Editor
Dr. Lucien Baldas

Université de Toulouse, Institut Clément Ader, 3 rue Caroline Aigle, 31400 Toulouse, France
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +33 (0) 5 61 17 11 01
Interests: microfluidics; gas microflows; fluidic microsystems; particle-laden microflows

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last two decades have witnessed a rapid development of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) involving gas microflows in various technical fields. Gas microflows can for example be observed in micro heat exchangers designed for chemical applications or for cooling of electronic components, in fluidic micro-actuators developed for active flow control purposes, in micronozzles used for the micropropulsion of nano and picosats, in micro gas chromatographs, analyzers or separators, in vacuum generators and in Knudsen micropumps, as well as in some organs-on-a-chip such as artificial lungs. These flows are rarefied due to the small MEMS dimensions and the rarefaction can be increased by low pressure conditions. The flows relate to the slip flow, transition or free molecular regimes, and can involve monatomic or polyatomic gases and gas mixtures. Hydrodynamics and heat and mass transfer are strongly impacted by rarefaction effects and temperature driven microflows offer new opportunities for designing original MEMS for gas pumping or separation. Accordingly, this Special Issue seeks to showcase research papers, short communications, and review articles that focus on novel theoretical and numerical models or data, as well as on new experimental results and technics, for improving knowledge on heat and mass transfer in gas microflows. Papers dealing with the development of original gas MEMS are also welcome.

We look forward to receiving your submission.

Prof. Stéphane Colin
Dr. Lucien Baldas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • gas microflows
  • rarefied flows
  • microscale heat and mass transfer in gases
  • gas MEMS
  • theoretical, experimental and numerical analysis

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Design of a Novel Axial Gas Pulses Micromixer and Simulations of its Mixing Abilities via Computational Fluid Dynamics
Micromachines 2019, 10(3), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10030205 (registering DOI)
Received: 31 January 2019 / Revised: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 23 March 2019
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Abstract
Following the fast development of microfluidics over the last decade, the need for methods for mixing two gases in flow at an overall flow rate ranging from 1 to 100 NmL·min−1 with programmable mixing ratios has been quickly increasing in many fields [...] Read more.
Following the fast development of microfluidics over the last decade, the need for methods for mixing two gases in flow at an overall flow rate ranging from 1 to 100 NmL·min−1 with programmable mixing ratios has been quickly increasing in many fields of application, especially in the calibration of analytical devices such as air pollution sensors. This work investigates numerically the mixing of pure gas pulses at flow rates in the range 1–100 NmL·min−1 in a newly designed multi-stage and modular micromixer composed of 4 buffer tanks of 300 µL each per stage. Results indicate that, for a 1 s pulse of pure gas (formaldehyde) followed by a 9 s pulse of pure carrier gas (air), that is a pulses ratio of 1/10, an effective mixing up to 94–96% can be readily obtained at the exit of the micromixer. This is achieved in less than 20 s for any flow rate ranging from 1 to 100 NmL·min−1 simply by adjusting the number of stages, 1 to 16 respectively. By using an already diluted gas bottle containing 100 ppm of a given compound in an inert gas same as the carrier gas, concentrations ranging from 10 to 90 ppm should be obtained by adjusting the pulses ratio between 1/10 and 9/10 respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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Open AccessArticle Development of a Toluene Detector Based on Deep UV Absorption Spectrophotometry Using Glass and Aluminum Capillary Tube Gas Cells with a LED Source
Micromachines 2019, 10(3), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10030193
Received: 14 February 2019 / Revised: 8 March 2019 / Accepted: 11 March 2019 / Published: 18 March 2019
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Abstract
A simple deep-ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrophotometer based on ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED) was developed for the detection of air-borne toluene with a good sensitivity. A fiber-coupled deep UV-LED was employed as a light source, and a spectrometer was used as a detector [...] Read more.
A simple deep-ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrophotometer based on ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED) was developed for the detection of air-borne toluene with a good sensitivity. A fiber-coupled deep UV-LED was employed as a light source, and a spectrometer was used as a detector with a gas cell in between. 3D printed opto-fluidics connectors were designed to integrate the gas flow with UV light. Two types of hollow core waveguides (HCW) were tested as gas cells: a glass capillary tube with aluminum-coated inner walls and an aluminum capillary tube. The setup was tested for different toluene concentrations (10–100 ppm), and a linear relationship was observed with sensitivities of 0.20 mA·U/ppm and 0.32 mA·U/ppm for the glass and aluminum HCWs, respectively. The corresponding limits of detection were found to be 8.1 ppm and 12.4 ppm, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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Open AccessArticle Sub-ppb Level Detection of BTEX Gaseous Mixtures with a Compact Prototype GC Equipped with a Preconcentration Unit
Micromachines 2019, 10(3), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10030187
Received: 8 February 2019 / Revised: 4 March 2019 / Accepted: 7 March 2019 / Published: 13 March 2019
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Abstract
In this work, a compact gas chromatograph prototype for near real-time benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) detection at sub-ppb levels has been developed. The system is composed of an aluminium preconcentrator (PC) filled with Basolite C300, a 20 m long Rxi-624 capillary [...] Read more.
In this work, a compact gas chromatograph prototype for near real-time benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) detection at sub-ppb levels has been developed. The system is composed of an aluminium preconcentrator (PC) filled with Basolite C300, a 20 m long Rxi-624 capillary column and a photoionization detector. The performance of the device has been evaluated in terms of adsorption capacity, linearity and sensitivity. Initially, PC breakthrough time for an equimolar 1 ppm BTEX mixture has been determined showing a remarkable capacity of the adsorbent to quantitatively trap BTEX even at high concentrations. Then, a highly linear relationship between sample volume and peak area has been obtained for all compounds by injecting 100-ppb samples with volumes ranging from 5–80 mL. Linear plots were also observed when calibration was conducted in the range 0–100 ppb using a 20 mL sampling volume implying a total analysis time of 19 min. Corresponding detection limits of 0.20, 0.26, 0.49, 0.80 and 1.70 ppb have been determined for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/p-xylenes and o-xylene, respectively. These experimental results highlight the potential applications of our device to monitor indoor or outdoor air quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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Open AccessArticle Gas Mixing and Final Mixture Composition Control in Simple Geometry Micro-mixers via DSMC Analysis
Micromachines 2019, 10(3), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10030178
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 1 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 March 2019 / Published: 7 March 2019
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Abstract
The mixing process of two pressure driven steady-state rarefied gas streams flowing between two parallel plates was investigated via DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) for different combinations of gases. The distance from the inlet, where the associated relative density difference of each species [...] Read more.
The mixing process of two pressure driven steady-state rarefied gas streams flowing between two parallel plates was investigated via DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) for different combinations of gases. The distance from the inlet, where the associated relative density difference of each species is minimized and the associated mixture homogeneity is optimized, is the so-called mixing length. In general, gas mixing progressed very rapidly. The type of gas surface interaction was clearly the most important parameter affecting gas mixing. As the reflection became more specular, the mixing length significantly increased. The mixing lengths of the HS (hard sphere) and VHS (variable hard sphere) collision models were higher than those of the VSS (variable soft sphere) model, while the corresponding relative density differences were negligible. In addition, the molecular mass ratio of the two components had a minor effect on the mixing length and a more important effect on the relative density difference. The mixture became less homogenous as the molecular mass ratio reduced. Finally, varying the channel length and/or the wall temperature had a minor effect. Furthermore, it was proposed to control the output mixture composition by adding in the mixing zone, the so-called splitter, separating the downstream flow into two outlet mainstreams. Based on intensive simulation data with the splitter, simple approximate expressions were derived, capable of providing, once the desired outlet mixture composition was specified, the correct position of the splitter, without performing time consuming simulations. The mixing analysis performed and the proposed approach for controlling gas mixing may support corresponding experimental work, as well as the design of gas micro-mixers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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Open AccessArticle A Comparison of Data Reduction Methods for Average Friction Factor Calculation of Adiabatic Gas Flows in Microchannels
Micromachines 2019, 10(3), 171; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10030171
Received: 9 February 2019 / Revised: 9 February 2019 / Accepted: 23 February 2019 / Published: 28 February 2019
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Abstract
In this paper, a combined numerical and experimental approach for the estimation of the average friction factor along adiabatic microchannels with compressible gas flows is presented. Pressure-drop experiments are performed for a rectangular microchannel with a hydraulic diameter of 295 μm by [...] Read more.
In this paper, a combined numerical and experimental approach for the estimation of the average friction factor along adiabatic microchannels with compressible gas flows is presented. Pressure-drop experiments are performed for a rectangular microchannel with a hydraulic diameter of 295 μ m by varying Reynolds number up to 17,000. In parallel, the calculation of friction factor has been repeated numerically and results are compared with the experimental work. The validated numerical model was also used to gain an insight of flow physics by varying the aspect ratio and hydraulic diameter of rectangular microchannels with respect to the channel tested experimentally. This was done with an aim of verifying the role of minor loss coefficients for the estimation of the average friction factor. To have laminar, transitional, and turbulent regimes captured, numerical analysis has been performed by varying Reynolds number from 200 to 20,000. Comparison of numerically and experimentally calculated gas flow characteristics has shown that adiabatic wall treatment (Fanno flow) results in better agreement of average friction factor values with conventional theory than the isothermal treatment of gas along the microchannel. The use of a constant value for minor loss coefficients available in the literature is not recommended for microflows as they change from one assembly to the other and their accurate estimation for compressible flows requires a coupling of numerical analysis with experimental data reduction. Results presented in this work demonstrate how an adiabatic wall treatment along the length of the channel coupled with the assumption of an isentropic flow from manifold to microchannel inlet results in a self-sustained experimental data reduction method for the accurate estimation of friction factor values even in presence of significant compressibility effects. Results also demonstrate that both the assumption of perfect expansion and consequently wrong estimation of average temperature between inlet and outlet of a microchannel can be responsible for an apparent increase in experimental average friction factor in choked flow regime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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Open AccessArticle Interactive Effects of Rarefaction and Surface Roughness on Aerodynamic Lubrication of Microbearings
Micromachines 2019, 10(2), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10020155
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 18 February 2019 / Accepted: 22 February 2019 / Published: 25 February 2019
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Abstract
The aerodynamic lubrication performance of gas microbearing has a particularly critical impact on the stability of the bearing-rotor system in micromachines. Based on the Duwensee’s slip correction model and the fractal geometry theory, the interactive effects of gas rarefaction and surface roughness on [...] Read more.
The aerodynamic lubrication performance of gas microbearing has a particularly critical impact on the stability of the bearing-rotor system in micromachines. Based on the Duwensee’s slip correction model and the fractal geometry theory, the interactive effects of gas rarefaction and surface roughness on the static and dynamic characteristics were investigated under various operation conditions and structure parameters. The modified Reynolds equation, which governs the gas film pressure distribution in rough bearing, is solved by employing the partial derivative method. The results show that high values of the eccentricity ratio and bearing number tend to increase the principal stiffness coefficients significantly, and the fractal roughness surface considerably affects the ultra-thin film damping characteristics compared to smooth surface bearing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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Open AccessArticle Modeling of Knudsen Layer Effects in the Micro-Scale Backward-Facing Step in the Slip Flow Regime
Micromachines 2019, 10(2), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10020118
Received: 27 December 2018 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 12 February 2019
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Abstract
The effect of the Knudsen layer in the thermal micro-scale gas flows has been investigated. The effective mean free path model has been implemented in the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, to extend its applicability up to slip and early transition [...] Read more.
The effect of the Knudsen layer in the thermal micro-scale gas flows has been investigated. The effective mean free path model has been implemented in the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, to extend its applicability up to slip and early transition flow regime. The conventional Navier-Stokes constitutive relations and the first-order non-equilibrium boundary conditions are modified based on the effective mean free path, which depends on the distance from the solid surface. The predictive capability of the standard ‘Maxwell velocity slip—Smoluchwoski temperature jump’ and hybrid boundary conditions ‘Langmuir Maxwell velocity slip—Langmuir Smoluchwoski temperature jump’ in conjunction with the Knudsen layer formulation has been evaluated in the present work. Simulations are carried out over a nano-/micro-scale backward facing step geometry in which flow experiences adverse pressure gradient, separation and re-attachment. Results are validated against the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) data, and have shown significant improvement over the existing CFD solvers. Non-equilibrium effects on the velocity and temperature of gas on the surface of the backward facing step channel are studied by varying the flow Knudsen number, inlet flow temperature, and wall temperature. Results show that the modified solver with hybrid Langmuir based boundary conditions gives the best predictions when the Knudsen layer is incorporated, and the standard Maxwell-Smoluchowski can accurately capture momentum and the thermal Knudsen layer when the temperature of the wall is higher than the fluid flow. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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Open AccessArticle Pressure Drop of Microchannel Plate Fin Heat Sinks
Micromachines 2019, 10(2), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10020080
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 20 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 24 January 2019
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Abstract
The entrance region constitutes a considerable fraction of the channel length in miniaturized devices. Laminar slip flow in microchannel plate fin heat sinks under hydrodynamically developing conditions is investigated semi-analytically and numerically in this paper. The semi-analytical model for the pressure drop of [...] Read more.
The entrance region constitutes a considerable fraction of the channel length in miniaturized devices. Laminar slip flow in microchannel plate fin heat sinks under hydrodynamically developing conditions is investigated semi-analytically and numerically in this paper. The semi-analytical model for the pressure drop of microchannel plate fin heat sinks is obtained by solving the momentum equation with the first-order velocity slip boundary conditions at the channel walls. The simple pressure drop model utilizes fundamental solutions from fluid dynamics to predict its constitutive components. The accuracy of the model is examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and the experimental and numerical data available in the literature. The model can be applied to either apparent liquid slip over hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces or gas slip flow in microchannel heat sinks. The developed model has an accuracy of 92 percent for slip flow in microchannel plate fin heat sinks. The developed model may be used to predict the pressure drop of slip flow in microchannel plate fin heat sinks for minimizing the effort and expense of experiments, especially in the design and optimization of microchannel plate fin heat sinks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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Open AccessArticle Study of Flow Characteristics of Gas Mixtures in a Rectangular Knudsen Pump
Micromachines 2019, 10(2), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10020079
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 24 January 2019
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Abstract
A Knudsen pump operates under the thermal transpiration effect or the thermal edge effect on the micro-scale. Due to the uneven temperature distribution of the walls in the channel axis direction or the constant temperature of the tips on the walls, directional thermally-induced [...] Read more.
A Knudsen pump operates under the thermal transpiration effect or the thermal edge effect on the micro-scale. Due to the uneven temperature distribution of the walls in the channel axis direction or the constant temperature of the tips on the walls, directional thermally-induced flow is generated. In this paper the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is applied for N2–O2 gas mixtures in the ratios of 4:1, 1:1, and 1:4 with different Knudsen numbers in a classic rectangular Knudsen pump to study the flow characteristics of the gas mixtures in the pump. The results show that the changing in the gas physical properties does not affect the distribution of the velocity field, temperature fields, or other fields in the Knudsen pump. The thermal creep effect is related to the molecular mass of the gas. Even in N2 and O2 gas mixtures with similar molecular masses, N2 can be also found to have a stronger thermal creep effect. Moreover, the lighter molecular weight gas (N2) can effectively promote the motion of the heavier gas (O2). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gas Flows in Microsystems)
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