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Special Issue "Optoelectronic Semiconductor Materials and Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2023 | Viewed by 3898

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Sheng-Joue Young
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electronic Engineering, National United University, Miaoli City 36063, Taiwan
Interests: semiconductor physics; optoelectronic devices; nanotechnology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Liang-Wen Ji
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, Taiwan
Interests: nano-optoelectronics; photo detector; nano-materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Yen-Lin Chu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Advanced Semiconductor Engineering, Inc., Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Interests: nano-optoelectronics; photo detector, nano-materials
Dr. Yi-Hsing Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan
Interests: semiconductor physics; optoelectronic devices; nanotechnology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Stephen D. Prior
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Aeronautics, Astronautics and Computational Engineering, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 7QF, UK
Interests: microsystem design; nanotechnology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

7th IEEE International Conference on Applied System Innovation 2021 (IEEE ICASI 2021, https://2021.icasi-conf.net/) will be held in Alishan, Chiayi, Taiwan on September 24-25, 2021; it will provide a unified communication platform for material topics. Scientists all over the world actively want to discover new advanced materials in electrical and mechanical engineering. In recent years, the applications of advanced materials have been highly-developing fields, notably, in the areas of semiconductor and electronic device technology, design, manufacturing, physics, and modeling. Therefore, the fields of electrical and mechanical materials have always been hot research areas. The scopes of iTIKI IEEE ICASI 2021 not only encompass material sizes at the nanoscale, but also in various dimensions, where the onset of size-dependent phenomena usually enables novel applications.

This Special Issue selects excellent papers from iTIKI IEEE ICASI 2021 and covers the following scopes, including fundamental and advanced materials of electrical and mechanical engineering, their synthesis and engineering, their application in optical sensors, magnetic, acoustic, and thermal transduction, their integration with many elements, designing of electrical or mechanical devices, evaluation various performance and exploring their broad applications in industry, environmental control, material analysis, etc. We invite investigators to contribute original research articles, as well as review articles, to this Special Issue.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Developments of advanced materials for new electrical and optical properties
  • Nanomaterials for preparation and applications
  • Combinatorial methods of advanced materials for mechanical design and optimization
  • Advanced materials for preparation and applications
  • Subjects related to electronic thin films and coating technology
  • Synthesis engineering of advanced materials
  • Advanced materials in mechatronics applications

Prof. Dr. Sheng-Joue Young
Prof. Dr. Liang-Wen Ji
Dr. Yen-Lin Chu
Dr. Yi-Hsing Liu
Dr. Stephen D. Prior
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • optoelectronic device
  • mechatronics
  • advanced materials
  • electronic thin films

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Role of Metallic Adlayer in Limiting Ge Incorporation into GaN
Materials 2022, 15(17), 5929; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15175929 - 27 Aug 2022
Viewed by 582
Abstract
Atomically thin metal adlayers are used as surfactants in semiconductor crystal growth. The role of the adlayer in the incorporation of dopants in GaN is completely unexplored, probably because n-type doping of GaN with Si is relatively straightforward and can be scaled [...] Read more.
Atomically thin metal adlayers are used as surfactants in semiconductor crystal growth. The role of the adlayer in the incorporation of dopants in GaN is completely unexplored, probably because n-type doping of GaN with Si is relatively straightforward and can be scaled up with available Si atomic flux in a wide range of dopant concentrations. However, a surprisingly different behavior of the Ge dopant is observed, and the presence of atomically thin gallium or an indium layer dramatically affects Ge incorporation, hindering the fabrication of GaN:Ge structures with abrupt doping profiles. Here, we show an experimental study presenting a striking improvement in sharpness of the Ge doping profile obtained for indium as compared to the gallium surfactant layer during GaN-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We show that the atomically thin indium surfactant layer promotes the incorporation of Ge in contrast to the gallium surfactant layer, which promotes segregation of Ge to the surface and Ge crystallite formation. Understanding the role of the surfactant is essential to control GaN doping and to obtain extremely high n-type doped III-nitride layers using Ge, because doping levels >1020 cm−3 are not easily available with Si. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optoelectronic Semiconductor Materials and Nanotechnology)
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Article
A Distance-Field-Based Pipe-Routing Method
Materials 2022, 15(15), 5376; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15155376 - 04 Aug 2022
Viewed by 587
Abstract
Pipes are commonly used to transport fuels, air, water, gas, hydraulic power, and other fluid-like materials in engine rooms, houses, factories, airplanes, and ships. Thus, pipe routing is essential in many industrial applications, including ship construction, machinery manufacturing, house building, laying out engine [...] Read more.
Pipes are commonly used to transport fuels, air, water, gas, hydraulic power, and other fluid-like materials in engine rooms, houses, factories, airplanes, and ships. Thus, pipe routing is essential in many industrial applications, including ship construction, machinery manufacturing, house building, laying out engine rooms, etc. To be functional, a pipe system should be economical while satisfying spatial constraints and safety regulations. Numerous routing algorithms have been published to optimize the pipe length and the number of elbows. However, relatively few methods have been designed to lay out pipes which strictly meet the spatial constraints and safety regulations. This article proposes a distance-field-based piping algorithm to remedy this problem. The proposed method converts the workspace into a 3D image and computes a distance field upon the workspace first. It then creates a feasible space out of the workspace by peeling the distance field and segmenting the 3D image. The resultant feasible space is collision-free and satisfies the spatial constraints and safety regulations. In the following step, a path-finding process, subjected to a cost function, is triggered to arrange the pipe inside the feasible space. Consequently, the cost of the pipe is optimized, and the pipe path rigidly meets the spatial constraints and safety regulations. The proposed method works effectively even if the workspace is narrow and complicated. In three experiments, the proposed method is employed to lay out pipes inside an underwater vehicle, a machinery room, and a two-story house, respectively. Not only do the resultant pipes possess minimal costs, but they also meet the spatial constraints and safety regulations, as predicted. In addition to developing the routing procedure, we also design a visualization subsystem to reveal the progression of the piping process and the variation of the workspace in the run time. Based on the displayed images, users can therefore evaluate the quality of the pipes on the fly and tune the piping parameters if necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optoelectronic Semiconductor Materials and Nanotechnology)
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Article
Designing and Calculating the Nonlinear Elastic Characteristic of Longitudinal–Transverse Transducers of an Ultrasonic Medical Instrument Based on the Method of Successive Loadings
Materials 2022, 15(11), 4002; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15114002 - 04 Jun 2022
Viewed by 641
Abstract
This paper presents a numerical method for studying the stress–strain state and obtaining the nonlinear elastic characteristics of longitudinal–transverse transducers. The authors propose a mathematical model that uses a direct numerical solution of the boundary value problem based on the plain curved rod [...] Read more.
This paper presents a numerical method for studying the stress–strain state and obtaining the nonlinear elastic characteristics of longitudinal–transverse transducers. The authors propose a mathematical model that uses a direct numerical solution of the boundary value problem based on the plain curved rod equations in Matlab. The system’s stress–strain state and nonlinear elastic characteristic are obtained using the method of successive loadings based on the curved rod’s linearized equations. For most ultrasonic instruments, the operating frequency of ultrasonic vibrations is close to 20 kHz. On the other hand, the received own oscillation frequencies are close to the working range. Using the method of successive loadings in the mathematical complex Matlab, a numerical calculation of the stress–strain state of a flat, curved rod at large displacements has been carried out. The proposed model can be considered an initial approximation to the solution of the spatial problem of the longitudinal–torsional transducer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optoelectronic Semiconductor Materials and Nanotechnology)
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Article
The Uniaxial Stress–Strain Relationship of Hyperelastic Material Models of Rubber Cracks in the Platens of Papermaking Machines Based on Nonlinear Strain and Stress Measurements with the Finite Element Method
Materials 2021, 14(24), 7534; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14247534 - 08 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1442
Abstract
Finite element analysis is extensively used in the design of rubber products. Rubber products can suffer from large amounts of distortion under working conditions as they are nonlinearly elastic, isotropic, and incompressible materials. Working conditions can vary over a large distortion range, and [...] Read more.
Finite element analysis is extensively used in the design of rubber products. Rubber products can suffer from large amounts of distortion under working conditions as they are nonlinearly elastic, isotropic, and incompressible materials. Working conditions can vary over a large distortion range, and relate directly to different distortion modes. Hyperelastic material models can describe the observed material behaviour. The goal of this investigation was to understand the stress and relegation fields around the tips of cracks in nearly incompressible, isotropic, hyperelastic accouterments, to directly reveal the uniaxial stress–strain relationship of hyperelastic soft accouterments. Numerical and factual trials showed that measurements of the stress–strain relationship could duly estimate values of nonlinear strain and stress for the neo-Hookean, Yeoh, and Arruda–Boyce hyperelastic material models. Numerical models were constructed using the finite element method. It was found that results concerning strains of 0–20% yielded curvatures that were nearly identical for both the neo-Hookean, and Arruda–Boyce models. We could also see that from the beginning of the test (0–5% strain), the curves produced from our experimental results, alongside those of the neo-Hookean and Arruda–Boyce models were identical. However, the experiment’s curves, alongside those of the Yeoh model, converged at a certain point (30% strain for Pieces No. 1 and 2, and 32% for Piece No. 3). The results showed that these finite element simulations were qualitatively in agreement with the actual experiments. We could also see that the Yeoh models performed better than the neo-Hookean model, and that the neo-Hookean model performed better than the Arruda–Boyce model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optoelectronic Semiconductor Materials and Nanotechnology)
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