Special Issue "Marine Sponge Biotechnology"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Micha Ilan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Zoology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo 69978, Israel
Interests: phylum Porifera (sponges) and its symbiosis especially with associated microorganisms
Prof. Dr. Shmuel Carmeli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Chemistry and Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel
Interests: chromatography; mass spectrometry; high-performance liquid chromatography; natural product chemistry; organic chemistry; NMR; structure elucidation; natural product; drug discovery
Dr. Michelle Kelly
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealanddisabled, Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: marine sponge systematist; marine biologist; marine natural products
Prof. Dr. Mark T. Hamann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Drug Discovery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
Interests: marine natural products chemistry; infectious diseases; cancer; spectroscopy; drug discovery and development
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sponges, the oldest animals on Earth, have been found to be a trove for biotechnological prospecting. From the early discoveries of novel marine drugs with pharmaceutical applications, sponges’ immense arsenal of secondary metabolites have been proven to have many potential applications, including as cosmeceuticals, industrial enzymes, agrochemicals, and nutraceuticals. Sponge-derived skeletons and compounds have been used for regenerative medicine and suggested as drug carriers. Biomimetic and bioinspired processes have been shown to have many beneficial uses. The utilization of sponges for bioremediation, or as bioindicators, has been demonstrated. Methods of acquiring novel sponge-derived compounds and obtaining large amounts of sought-after molecules demand the employment of many techniques. These include aquaculture, microbial culture, cell culture, gene mining, natural product chemistry, and other biotechnological approaches, taking advantage of the rapid improvements in various omics methods and new instrumentation. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight and promote research on the various aspects of Sponge Biotechnology, and suggest avenues through which to achieve sustainable blue biotechnology.

Prof. Dr. Micha Ilan
Prof. Dr. Shmuel Carmeli
Dr. Michelle Kelly
Prof. Dr. Mark T. Hamann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aquaculture
  • Biomimetics
  • Cosmeceuticals
  • Data mining
  • Heterologous expression
  • Natural products
  • Pharmaceutical
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Tissue engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
3-D Culture of Marine Sponge Cells for Production of Bioactive Compounds
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(10), 569; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19100569 - 14 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Production of sponge-derived bioactive compounds in vitro has been proposed as an alternative to wild harvest, aquaculture, and chemical synthesis to meet the demands of clinical drug development and manufacture. Until recently, this was not possible because there were no marine invertebrate cell [...] Read more.
Production of sponge-derived bioactive compounds in vitro has been proposed as an alternative to wild harvest, aquaculture, and chemical synthesis to meet the demands of clinical drug development and manufacture. Until recently, this was not possible because there were no marine invertebrate cell lines. Recent breakthroughs in the development of sponge cell lines and rapid cell division in improved nutrient media now make this approach a viable option. We hypothesized that three-dimensional (3-D) cell cultures would better represent how sponges function in nature, including the production of bioactive compounds. We successfully cultured sponge cells in 3-D matrices using FibraCel® disks, thin hydrogel layers, and gel microdroplets (GMDs). For in vitro production of bioactive compounds, the use of GMDs is recommended. Nutrients and sponge products rapidly diffuse into and out of the 3-D matrix, the GMDs may be scaled up in spinner flasks, and cells and/or secreted products can be easily recovered. Research on scale-up and production is in progress in our laboratory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Sponge Biotechnology)
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Article
Cyclopeptide Derivatives from the Sponge-Derived Fungus Acremonium persicinum F10
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(10), 537; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19100537 - 24 Sep 2021
Viewed by 326
Abstract
Cyclopeptides usually play a pivotal role, either in the viability or virulence of fungi. Two types of cyclopeptides, six new hydroxamate siderophore cyclohexapeptides (16), including acremonpeptides E and F, and their complexes with aluminum and ferric ions; one new [...] Read more.
Cyclopeptides usually play a pivotal role, either in the viability or virulence of fungi. Two types of cyclopeptides, six new hydroxamate siderophore cyclohexapeptides (16), including acremonpeptides E and F, and their complexes with aluminum and ferric ions; one new cyclic pentapeptolide, aselacin D (9); together with a known compound, aselacin C (10), were isolated and characterized from the sponge-derived fungus Acremonium persicinum F10. In addition, two new siderophore analogues chelating gallium ions (Ga3+), Ga (III)-acremonpeptide E (7) and Ga (III)-acremonpeptide F (8), using isolated acremonpeptides E and F, were prepared. The planar structures of 110 were elucidated by HRESIMS and (1D and 2D) NMR. The absolute configurations of amino acids were determined by means of the advanced Marfey’s method and X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer was performed to disclose the elements of compound 1, indicating the existence of aluminum (Al). Al (III)-acremonpeptides E (1), Ga (III)-acremonpeptides E (5), Al (III)-acremonpeptide F (7), and Ga (III)-acremonpeptide F (8) displayed high in vitro anti-fungal activities, which are comparable to amphotericin B, against Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Sponge Biotechnology)
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Review
A Soft Spot for Chemistry–Current Taxonomic and Evolutionary Implications of Sponge Secondary Metabolite Distribution
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(8), 448; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19080448 - 04 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Marine sponges are the most prolific marine sources for discovery of novel bioactive compounds. Sponge secondary metabolites are sought-after for their potential in pharmaceutical applications, and in the past, they were also used as taxonomic markers alongside the difficult and homoplasy-prone sponge morphology [...] Read more.
Marine sponges are the most prolific marine sources for discovery of novel bioactive compounds. Sponge secondary metabolites are sought-after for their potential in pharmaceutical applications, and in the past, they were also used as taxonomic markers alongside the difficult and homoplasy-prone sponge morphology for species delineation (chemotaxonomy). The understanding of phylogenetic distribution and distinctiveness of metabolites to sponge lineages is pivotal to reveal pathways and evolution of compound production in sponges. This benefits the discovery rate and yield of bioprospecting for novel marine natural products by identifying lineages with high potential of being new sources of valuable sponge compounds. In this review, we summarize the current biochemical data on sponges and compare the metabolite distribution against a sponge phylogeny. We assess compound specificity to lineages, potential convergences, and suitability as diagnostic phylogenetic markers. Our study finds compound distribution corroborating current (molecular) phylogenetic hypotheses, which include yet unaccepted polyphyly of several demosponge orders and families. Likewise, several compounds and compound groups display a high degree of lineage specificity, which suggests homologous biosynthetic pathways among their taxa, which identifies yet unstudied species of this lineage as promising bioprospecting targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Sponge Biotechnology)
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