Special Issue "Marine Biomimetics"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marcin Wysokowski E-Mail
Institute of Chemical Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60965 Poznań, Poland
Interests: marine biomaterials; biominerals; biocomposites; extreme biomimetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent advances in structural biology, biochemistry, biomineralization, genomics, proteomics, and material sciences have resulted in the rapid development of biomimetics as a powerful scientific direction, oriented at solving technological challenges and the development of new nature-inspired technologies. Due to diversity of marine invertebrates and vertebrates, remarkable functional properties of their nano-organized, biomineralized structures seem to be an inexhaustible source of inspiration for modern materials science and biomaterial design. Especially, where there is strong interest in the combination of various inorganic nano-organized structures with biomacromolecules, including self-assembly and templating activity of diverse organic scaffolds. On the other hand, non-mineralized structures like byssus and related DOPA-based polymers are excellent examples for the development of bioinspired-adhesives.

This Special Issue of Marine Drugs will highlight the importance of diverse marine organisms as a renewable source of biopolymers and biocomposite-containing structures which can be used for inspiration in widely-understood modern biomimetics. Bio-inspiration is, not only oriented to the observation of natural structures alone, but also requires a thorough investigation of structure–function relationships in biological materials. Therefore, this Special Issue will collect novel research papers and original reviews focusing on creation of advanced bioinspired technologies inspired by marine organisms.

I am looking forward for your input.

Dr. Marcin Wysokowski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chitin

  • Chitosan

  • Collagen

  • Calcification

  • Diatoms

  • Scaffolds

  • Sponges

  • Spongin

  • Biocomposites

  • Biofouling

  • Biopolymers

  • Biomimetics

  • Biomaterials

  • Biosilica

  • Biomineralization

  • Bioadhesives

  • Hydrogels

  • Marine invertebrates

  • Robotics

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication and Characterization of Core-Shell Electrospun Fibrous Mats Containing Medicinal Herbs for Wound Healing and Skin Tissue Engineering
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17010027 - 05 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Nanofibrous structures mimicking the native extracellular matrix have attracted considerable attention for biomedical applications. The present study aims to design and produce drug-eluting core-shell fibrous scaffolds for wound healing and skin tissue engineering. Aloe vera extracts were encapsulated inside polymer fibers containing chitosan, [...] Read more.
Nanofibrous structures mimicking the native extracellular matrix have attracted considerable attention for biomedical applications. The present study aims to design and produce drug-eluting core-shell fibrous scaffolds for wound healing and skin tissue engineering. Aloe vera extracts were encapsulated inside polymer fibers containing chitosan, polycaprolactone, and keratin using the co-axial electrospinning technique. Electron microscopic studies show that continuous and uniform fibers with an average diameter of 209 ± 47 nm were successfully fabricated. The fibers have a core-shell structure with a shell thickness of about 90 nm, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. By employing Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the characteristic peaks of Aloe vera were detected, which indicate successful incorporation of this natural herb into the polymeric fibers. Tensile testing and hydrophilicity measurements indicated an ultimate strength of 5.3 MPa (elongation of 0.63%) and water contact angle of 89°. In-vitro biological assay revealed increased cellular growth and adhesion with the presence of Aloe vera without any cytotoxic effects. The prepared core-shell fibrous mats containing medical herbs have a great potential for wound healing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Biomimetics)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Adhesion of Fish Ovarian Germline Stem Cells on Solid Surfaces by Mussel-Inspired Polymer Coating
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17010011 - 26 Dec 2018
Abstract
Development of advanced cell culture methods has gained increasing attention because it allows for efficient genetic engineering and precise regulation of animal reproduction on a cellular basis. Numerous studies have attempted to develop an advanced cell culture method. Previous studies have altered cell [...] Read more.
Development of advanced cell culture methods has gained increasing attention because it allows for efficient genetic engineering and precise regulation of animal reproduction on a cellular basis. Numerous studies have attempted to develop an advanced cell culture method. Previous studies have altered cell culture media and pretreated culture plates with functional molecules. Among them, a mussel-inspired polymer coating has been extensively utilized owing to its wide applicability. For instance, adhesion of human embryonic stem cells and neuronal cells on solid surfaces has been improved. Despite the excellent capability of the mussel-inspired polymer coating, most studies have primarily focused on mammalian cells. However, the efficacy of these coatings on the adhesion of other cell lines is yet unclear. This study aimed to assess the potential of the mussel-inspired polymer coating in the regulation of the adhesion of fish ovarian germline stem cells on solid surfaces. Solid surfaces were coated by polydopamine and poly-L-lysine, and the effect of the coatings on cellular behaviors was investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Biomimetics)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis of Poly(norbornene-methylamine), a Biomimetic of Chitosan, by Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP)
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(7), 223; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15070223 - 14 Jul 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
ROMP is an effective method for preparing functional polymers due to its having characteristics of “living” polymerization and rapid development of catalysts. In the present work, poly(norbornene-methylamine), a mimic of chitosan, was synthesized via ROMP reaction. The amino-protected product, 5-norbornene-2-(N-methyl)-phthalimide, was [...] Read more.
ROMP is an effective method for preparing functional polymers due to its having characteristics of “living” polymerization and rapid development of catalysts. In the present work, poly(norbornene-methylamine), a mimic of chitosan, was synthesized via ROMP reaction. The amino-protected product, 5-norbornene-2-(N-methyl)-phthalimide, was prepared by a reaction of 5-norbornene-2-methylamine with phthalic anhydride, which was then subjected to the ROMP reaction in the presence of Hoveyda-Grubbs 2nd catalyst to afford poly(norbornene-(N-methyl)-phthalimide). The target product, poly(norbornene-methylamine), was obtained by deprotection reaction of poly(norbornene-(N-methyl)-phthalimide). The products in each step were characterized by FTIR and 1H-NMR, and their thermal stabilities were determined by TG analysis. The effects of molar ratio between monomer ([M]/[I]) and catalyst on the average relative molecular weight ( M n ¯ ) and molecular weight distribution of the produced polymer products were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). It was found that the M n ¯ of poly(norbornene-(N-methyl)-phthalimide) was controllable and exhibited a narrow polydispersity index (PDI) (~1.10). The synthesis condition of 5-norbornene-2-(N-methyl)-phthalimide was optimized by determining the yields at different reaction temperatures and reaction times. The highest yield was obtained at a reaction temperature of 130 °C and a reaction time of 20 min. Our work provides a new strategy to synthesize polymers with controllable structures and free –NH2 groups via ROMP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Biomimetics)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Alginate Materials and Dental Impression Technique: A Current State of the Art and Application to Dental Practice
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17010018 - 29 Dec 2018
Cited by 8
Abstract
Hydrocolloids were the first elastic materials to be used in the dental field. Elastic impression materials include reversible (agar-agar), irreversible (alginate) hydrocolloids and synthetic elastomers (polysulfides, polyethers, silicones). They reproduce an imprint faithfully, providing details of a high definition despite the presence of [...] Read more.
Hydrocolloids were the first elastic materials to be used in the dental field. Elastic impression materials include reversible (agar-agar), irreversible (alginate) hydrocolloids and synthetic elastomers (polysulfides, polyethers, silicones). They reproduce an imprint faithfully, providing details of a high definition despite the presence of undercuts. With the removal of the impression, being particularly rich in water, the imprints can deform but later adapt to the original shape due to the elastic properties they possess. The advantages of using alginate include the low cost, a better tolerability on the part of the patient, the ease of manipulation, the short time needed for execution, the instrumentation and the very simple execution technique and possibility of detecting a detailed impression (even in the presence of undercuts) in a single step. A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed database. Authors conducted a search of articles in written in English published from 2008 to 2018. All the relevant studies were included in the search with respect to the characteristics and evolution of new marine derived materials. Much progress has been made in the search for new marine derived materials. Conventional impression materials are different, and especially with the advent of digital technology, they have been suffering from a decline in research attention over the last few years. However, this type of impression material, alginates (derived from marine algae), have the advantage of being among the most used in the dental medical field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Biomimetics)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Marine and Freshwater Feedstocks as a Precursor for Nitrogen-Containing Carbons: A Review
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050142 - 26 Apr 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Marine-derived as well as freshwater feedstock offers important benefits, such as abundance, morphological and structural variety, and the presence of multiple elements, including nitrogen and carbon. Therefore, these renewal resources may be useful for obtaining N- and C-containing materials that can be manufactured [...] Read more.
Marine-derived as well as freshwater feedstock offers important benefits, such as abundance, morphological and structural variety, and the presence of multiple elements, including nitrogen and carbon. Therefore, these renewal resources may be useful for obtaining N- and C-containing materials that can be manufactured by various methods, such as pyrolysis and hydrothermal processes supported by means of chemical and physical activators. However, every synthesis concept relies on an efficient transfer of nitrogen and carbon from marine/freshwater feedstock to the final product. This paper reviews the advantages of marine feedstock over synthetic and natural but non-marine resources as precursors for the manufacturing of N-doped activated carbons. The manufacturing procedure influences some crucial properties of nitrogen-doped carbon materials, such as pore structure and the chemical composition of the surface. An extensive review is given on the relationship between carbon materials manufacturing from marine feedstock and the elemental content of nitrogen, together with a description of the chemical bonding of nitrogen atoms at the surface. N-doped carbons may serve as effective adsorbents for the removal of pollutants from the gas or liquid phase. Non-recognized areas of adsorption-based applications for nitrogen-doped carbons are presented, too. The paper proves that nitrogen-doped carbon materials belong to most of the prospective electrode materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies such as fuel cells, air–metal batteries, and supercapacitors, as well as for bioimaging. The reviewed material belongs to the widely understood field of marine biotechnology in relation to marine natural products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Biomimetics)
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Open AccessReview
Marine Spongin: Naturally Prefabricated 3D Scaffold-Based Biomaterial
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(3), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16030088 - 09 Mar 2018
Cited by 9
Abstract
The biosynthesis, chemistry, structural features and functionality of spongin as a halogenated scleroprotein of keratosan demosponges are still paradigms. This review has the principal goal of providing thorough and comprehensive coverage of spongin as a naturally prefabricated 3D biomaterial with multifaceted applications. The [...] Read more.
The biosynthesis, chemistry, structural features and functionality of spongin as a halogenated scleroprotein of keratosan demosponges are still paradigms. This review has the principal goal of providing thorough and comprehensive coverage of spongin as a naturally prefabricated 3D biomaterial with multifaceted applications. The history of spongin’s discovery and use in the form of commercial sponges, including their marine farming strategies, have been analyzed and are discussed here. Physicochemical and material properties of spongin-based scaffolds are also presented. The review also focuses on prospects and trends in applications of spongin for technology, materials science and biomedicine. Special attention is paid to applications in tissue engineering, adsorption of dyes and extreme biomimetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Biomimetics)
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