E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Characterization of Bioactive Components in Edible Algae"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 November 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Leonel Pereira

Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +351 239855241
Interests: Marine biotechnology, nutrition, phycocolloids, seaweeds, taxonomy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,                

Numerous factors affect the quality of modern life so that the population should be aware of the importance of food containing substances that help promote health, thereby bringing about an improvement in nutritional status. The incidence of death due to cancer, cardiovascular accidents, stroke, atherosclerosis, liver diseases, among others, can be minimized through good eating habits. Functional foods and nutraceuticals have commonly been considered synonyms, however, functional foods should be in the form of common food, consumed as part of the diet and produce specific health benefits, such as reducing the risk of various diseases and maintenance of physical and mental well-being. Biologically active substances found in functional foods can be classified such as probiotics and prebiotics, nitrogenated foods, pigments and vitamins, phenolic compounds, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and fibers.

The marine environment provides a huge source of many healthy foods including algae (seaweed – green, red, and brown macroalgae), an example of a marine product that has been part of the diet in several countries around the world. Furthermore, marine specimens are also sources of an abundance of chemicals many of them with biological properties and therefore called bioactive compounds. These chemicals can be extracted and incorporated in several food matrices leading to new potential functional foods.

Poor in fat, marine algae have polysaccharides that behave, for the most part, as non-caloric fibers. Algae therefore appear to be the best way to correct the current global nutrient deficiencies (in developed, emerging and / or underdeveloped countries) because of their varied range of essential constituents - minerals (iron and calcium), proteins (with all essential amino acids), vitamins and fibers - nutrients absolutely necessary for the primary human metabolism.

Prof. Leonel Pereira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • edible algae
  • seaweeds
  • microalgae
  • minerals
  • vitamins
  • polysaccharides
  • proteins
  • amino acids
  • fatty acids
  • pigments
  • phenolic compounds

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Anticoagulant Activity of Sulfated Ulvan Isolated from the Green Macroalga Ulva rigida
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(5), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17050291
Received: 2 April 2019 / Revised: 30 April 2019 / Accepted: 7 May 2019 / Published: 14 May 2019
PDF Full-text (3918 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
(1) Background: Brown and red algal sulfated polysaccharides have been widely described as anticoagulant agents. However, data on green algae, especially on the Ulva genus, are limited. This study aimed at isolating ulvan from the green macroalga Ulva rigida using an acid- and [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Brown and red algal sulfated polysaccharides have been widely described as anticoagulant agents. However, data on green algae, especially on the Ulva genus, are limited. This study aimed at isolating ulvan from the green macroalga Ulva rigida using an acid- and solvent-free procedure, and investigating the effect of sulfate content on the anticoagulant activity of this polysaccharide. (2) Methods: The obtained ulvan fraction was chemically sulfated, leading to a doubling of the polysaccharide sulfate content in a second ulvan fraction. The potential anticoagulant activity of both ulvan fractions was then assessed using different assays, targeting the intrinsic and/or common (activated partial thromboplastin time), extrinsic (prothrombin time), and common (thrombin time) pathways, and the specific antithrombin-dependent pathway (anti-Xa and anti-IIa), of the coagulation cascade. Furthermore, their anticoagulant properties were compared to those of commercial anticoagulants: heparin and Lovenox®. (3) Results: The anticoagulant activity of the chemically-sulfated ulvan fraction was stronger than that of Lovenox® against both the intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. (4) Conclusion: The chemically-sulfated ulvan fraction could be a very interesting alternative to heparins, with different targets and a high anticoagulant activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization of Bioactive Components in Edible Algae)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Sargassum muticum and Osmundea pinnatifida Enzymatic Extracts: Chemical, Structural, and Cytotoxic Characterization
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(4), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17040209
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 27 March 2019 / Accepted: 29 March 2019 / Published: 3 April 2019
PDF Full-text (2109 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Seaweeds, which have been widely used for human consumption, are considered a potential source of biological compounds, where enzyme-assisted extraction can be an efficient method to obtain multifunctional extracts. Chemical characterization of Sargassum muticum and Osmundea pinnatifida extracts obtained by Alcalase and Viscozyme [...] Read more.
Seaweeds, which have been widely used for human consumption, are considered a potential source of biological compounds, where enzyme-assisted extraction can be an efficient method to obtain multifunctional extracts. Chemical characterization of Sargassum muticum and Osmundea pinnatifida extracts obtained by Alcalase and Viscozyme assisted extraction, respectively, showed an increment of macro/micro elements in comparison to the corresponding dry seaweeds, while the ratio of Na/K decreased in both extracts. Galactose, mannose, xylose, fucose, and glucuronic acid were the main monosaccharides (3.2–27.3 mg/glyophilized extract) present in variable molar ratios, whereas low free amino acids content and diversity (1.4–2.7 g/100 gprotein) characterized both extracts. FTIR-ATR and 1H NMR spectra confirmed the presence of important polysaccharide structures in the extracts, namely fucoidans from S. muticum or agarans as sulfated polysaccharides from O. pinnatifida. No cytotoxicity against normal mammalian cells was observed from 0 to 4 mglyophilized extract/mL for both extracts. The comprehensive characterization of the composition and safety of these two extracts fulfils an important step towards their authorized application for nutritional and/or nutraceutical purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization of Bioactive Components in Edible Algae)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Dietary Supplementation with Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan Enhances Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses and Protects against Mycoplasma pneumoniae Antigen Stimulation
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(3), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17030175
Received: 15 February 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 14 March 2019 / Published: 18 March 2019
PDF Full-text (2114 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the low-molecular-weight (LMW) fucoidan, rich in fucose and sulfate, was extracted and purified from the edible brown seaweed, Laminaria japonica. In this study, we orally administered LMW fucoidan to mice for 6 weeks. We then examined fucoidan’s effects on [...] Read more.
In this study, the low-molecular-weight (LMW) fucoidan, rich in fucose and sulfate, was extracted and purified from the edible brown seaweed, Laminaria japonica. In this study, we orally administered LMW fucoidan to mice for 6 weeks. We then examined fucoidan’s effects on innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP)-antigen-stimulated immune responses. Our data showed that LMW fucoidan stimulated the innate immune system by increasing splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, and phagocytic activity. LMW fucoidan also increased interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion by splenocytes and immunoglobulin (Ig)-G and IgA content in serum, which help regulate adaptive immune cell functions, and decreased allergen-specific IgE. In MP-antigen-stimulated immune responses, the IgM and IgG content in the serum were significantly higher in the LMW fucoidan group after MP-antigen stimulation. Our study provides further information about the immunomodulatory effects of LMW fucoidan and highlights a potential role in preventing M. pneumoniae infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization of Bioactive Components in Edible Algae)
Figures

Figure 1

Mar. Drugs EISSN 1660-3397 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top