Topical Collection "Papers from “Sino–Italian Symposium on Bioactive Natural Products”"

Editor

Prof. Dr. Orazio Taglialatela-Scafati
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Collection Editor

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the foundation of a thousand-year-old tradition, China and Italy are recognized leaders in the research fields of natural product chemistry, natural product synthesis/biosynthesis, and in the discovery of innovative medicines from natural sources. The Sino–Italian Symposium on Bioactive Natural Products (SISBNP) is held annually in, alternately, China and Italy. The aim of such academic events is to share advanced ideas in the field of natural product sciences and to appreciate the relevant breakthroughs that may promote the development of drug discovery chemistry with indispensable significance for human survival.

This Marine Drugs Collection will provide a platform for the symposium attendees to publish papers with a particular focus on natural products isolated from marine invertebrates and marine microorganisms, potentially useful as biological tools or as lead compounds for the development of new drugs. All submissions will be evaluated by the Editor-in-Chief or an appropriate Editorial Board Member and go through strict peer-review before publication.

Prof. Orazio Taglialatela-Scafati
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

2019

Jump to: 2018, 2017

Open AccessReview
Chemistry and Biology of Siderophores from Marine Microbes
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(10), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17100562 - 29 Sep 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1756
Abstract
Microbial siderophores are multidentate Fe(III) chelators used by microbes during siderophore-mediated assimilation. They possess high affinity and selectivity for Fe(III). Among them, marine siderophore-mediated microbial iron uptake allows marine microbes to proliferate and survive in the iron-deficient marine environments. Due to their unique [...] Read more.
Microbial siderophores are multidentate Fe(III) chelators used by microbes during siderophore-mediated assimilation. They possess high affinity and selectivity for Fe(III). Among them, marine siderophore-mediated microbial iron uptake allows marine microbes to proliferate and survive in the iron-deficient marine environments. Due to their unique iron(III)-chelating properties, delivery system, structural diversity, and therapeutic potential, marine microbial siderophores have great potential for further development of various drug conjugates for antibiotic-resistant bacteria therapy or as a target for inhibiting siderophore virulence factors to develop novel broad-spectrum antibiotics. This review covers siderophores derived from marine microbes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Molecular Networking-Based Analysis of Cytotoxic Saponins from Sea Cucumber Holothuria atra
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(2), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17020086 - 01 Feb 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1827
Abstract
The saponin composition of a specimen of black sea cucumber, Holothuria atra collected in the Persian Gulf was studied by a combined approach including LC-MS/MS, Molecular Networking, pure compound isolation, and NMR spectroscopy. The saponin composition of Holothuria atra turned out to be [...] Read more.
The saponin composition of a specimen of black sea cucumber, Holothuria atra collected in the Persian Gulf was studied by a combined approach including LC-MS/MS, Molecular Networking, pure compound isolation, and NMR spectroscopy. The saponin composition of Holothuria atra turned out to be more complex than previously reported. The most abundant saponins in the extract (14) were isolated and characterized by 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. Compound 1 was identified as a new triterpene glycoside saponin, holothurin A5. The side chain of the new saponin 1, unprecedented among triterpene glycosides, is characterized by an electrophilic enone function, which can undergo slow water or methanol addition under neutral conditions. The cytotoxic activity of compounds 14, evaluated on the human cervix carcinoma HeLa cell line, was remarkable, with IC50 values ranging from 1.2 to 2.5 µg/mL. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Quorum Sensing Inhibitors from Marine Microorganisms and Their Synthetic Derivatives
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(2), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17020080 - 28 Jan 2019
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2576
Abstract
Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) present a promising alternative or potent adjuvants of conventional antibiotics for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, since they could disrupt bacterial pathogenicity without imposing selective pressure involved in antibacterial treatments. This review covers a series of molecules showing [...] Read more.
Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) present a promising alternative or potent adjuvants of conventional antibiotics for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, since they could disrupt bacterial pathogenicity without imposing selective pressure involved in antibacterial treatments. This review covers a series of molecules showing quorum sensing (QS) inhibitory activity that are isolated from marine microorganisms, including bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi, and chemically synthesized based on QSIs derived from marine microorganisms. This is the first comprehensive overview of QSIs derived from marine microorganisms and their synthetic analogues with QS inhibitory activity. Full article
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2018

Jump to: 2019, 2017

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
New Antibacterial Phenone Derivatives Asperphenone A–C from Mangrove-Derived Fungus Aspergillus sp. YHZ-1
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(2), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16020045 - 30 Jan 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2241
Abstract
Marine fungi are a promising source of novel bioactive natural products with diverse structure. In our search for new bioactive natural products from marine fungi, three new phenone derivatives, asperphenone A–C (13), have been isolated from the ethyl acetate [...] Read more.
Marine fungi are a promising source of novel bioactive natural products with diverse structure. In our search for new bioactive natural products from marine fungi, three new phenone derivatives, asperphenone A–C (13), have been isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the fermentation broth of the mangrove-derived fungus, Aspergillus sp. YHZ-1. The chemical structures of these natural products were elucidated on the basis of mass spectrometry, one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic analysis and asperphenone A and B were confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited weak antibacterial activity against four Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus CMCC(B) 26003, Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC19615, Bacillus subtilis CICC 10283 and Micrococcus luteus, with the MIC values higher than 32.0 µM. Full article
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2017

Jump to: 2019, 2018

Open AccessArticle
Metabolites with Insecticidal Activity from Aspergillus fumigatus JRJ111048 Isolated from Mangrove Plant Acrostichum specioum Endemic to Hainan Island
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(12), 381; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15120381 - 06 Dec 2017
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 1911
Abstract
Fungi residing in mangroves are considered to be a bank of novel bioactive natural products. In the screening for bioactive metabolites from mangrove-derived fungi, the ethyl acetate extract of the fermentation broth of Aspergillus fumigatus JRJ111048, a fungus isolated from the leaves of [...] Read more.
Fungi residing in mangroves are considered to be a bank of novel bioactive natural products. In the screening for bioactive metabolites from mangrove-derived fungi, the ethyl acetate extract of the fermentation broth of Aspergillus fumigatus JRJ111048, a fungus isolated from the leaves of the mangrove plant Acrostichum specioum endemic to Hainan island, was found to possess insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura. Bioactivity-guided isolation lead to the discovery of seven metabolites 17, including one new anhydride derivative aspergide (1), one new lipid amide 11-methyl-11-hydroxyldodecanoic acid amide (2), and five known compounds; α-ethyl glucoside (3), spiculisporic acid B (4), spiculisporic acid C (5), spiculisporic acid (6), and secospiculisporic acid B (7). Their structures were established by NMR spectroscopic and MS analyses, and by comparison of previously reported data. Insecticidal activity against S. litura and antifungal activity of these compounds were investigated. As a result, the new compound 1 showed potent insecticidal activity against newly hatched larvae of S. litura, and compound 4 displayed weak antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Full article
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