Special Issue "Marine Macrolides: Structure, Biosynthetic Aspects and Potential as a New Drug"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Jaime Rodríguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Química, Facultade de Ciencias and Centro de Investigacions Científicas Avanzadas (CICA). Universidade da Coruña, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15071 A Coruña, Spain
Interests: Synthesis of natural products and analogues; Applications of NMR structural analysis; Isolation and elucidation of natural products

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Macrolides are common structural scaffolds widespread in nature. The structures of these large-ring lactones usually are very difficult to elucidate, either for the minute amounts isolated or by their intricate flexible and highly substituted skeletons. Marine organism and their symbionts have produced a large number of structurally diverse macrolides with important biological activities. The sponges are the most important source of this type of secondary metabolites; however, dinoflagellate, algae, and tunicates have been also studied and, from a chemical structure point of view, very interesting polyene backbones have been discovered.

Good examples of known marine macrolides are the bryostatins, the spongistatins, or the halichondrins, the first marine macrolides established as powerful antimitotic agents. Since then there has been extensive attention in the halichondrin family. This interest is, without doubt, due to their outstanding potential as therapeutic agent demonstrated with the development of the already approved drug erybulin mesylate (Halaven™). This halichondrin B derivative is being used for metastatic breast cancer in patients who have received at least two prior chemotherapy regimens for late stage disease.

With these precedents, the goals of the proposed Special Issue will be to show marine macrolides from three different points of view: (a) Structural elucidation of their chemical structures, (b) description of their biological activities (c) the aspects related to the biosynthesis. Synthetic approaches to their skeletons will be also considered.

Prof. Jaime Rodríguez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Desertomycin G, a New Antibiotic with Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Human Breast Tumor Cell Lines Produced by Streptomyces althioticus MSM3, Isolated from the Cantabrian Sea Intertidal Macroalgae Ulva sp.
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(2), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17020114 - 12 Feb 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
The isolation and structural elucidation of a structurally new desertomycin, designated as desertomycin G (1), with strong antibiotic activity against several clinically relevant antibiotic resistant pathogens are described herein. This new natural product was obtained from cultures of the marine actinomycete [...] Read more.
The isolation and structural elucidation of a structurally new desertomycin, designated as desertomycin G (1), with strong antibiotic activity against several clinically relevant antibiotic resistant pathogens are described herein. This new natural product was obtained from cultures of the marine actinomycete Streptomyces althioticus MSM3, isolated from samples of the intertidal seaweed Ulva sp. collected in the Cantabrian Sea (Northeast Atlantic Ocean). Particularly interesting is its strong antibiotic activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates, resistant to antibiotics in clinical use. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a member of the desertomycin family displaying such activity. Additionally, desertomycin G shows strong antibiotic activities against other relevant Gram-positive clinical pathogens such as Corynebacterium urealyticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Clostridium perfringens. Desertomycin G also displays moderate antibiotic activity against relevant Gram-negative clinical pathogens such as Bacteroides fragilis, Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis. In addition, the compound affects viability of tumor cell lines, such as human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and colon carcinoma (DLD-1), but not normal mammary fibroblasts. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Marine Macrolides with Antibacterial and/or Antifungal Activity
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(4), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17040241 - 23 Apr 2019
Abstract
Currently, the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics is a serious problem. Marine organisms are the source of thousands of substances, which also have antibacterial and antifungal effects. Among them, marine macrolides are significant. In this review, the antibacterial and/or antifungal activities of [...] Read more.
Currently, the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics is a serious problem. Marine organisms are the source of thousands of substances, which also have antibacterial and antifungal effects. Among them, marine macrolides are significant. In this review, the antibacterial and/or antifungal activities of 34 groups of marine macrolides are presented. Exemplary groups are chalcomycins, curvulides, halichondramides, lobophorins, macrolactins, modiolides, scytophycins, spongistatins, or zearalanones. In the paper, 74 antibiotics or their analog sets, among which 29 with antifungal activity, 25 that are antibacterial, and 20 that are both antifungal and antibacterial are summarized. Also, 36 macrolides or their sets are produced by bacteria, 18 by fungi, ten by sponges, seven by algae, two by porifera, and one by nudibranch. Moreover, the chemical structures of representatives from each of the 34 groups of these antibiotics are presented. To summarize, marine organisms are rich in natural macrolides. Some of these may be used in the future in the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections. Marine macrolides can also be potential drugs applicable against pathogens resistant to currently known antibiotics. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Marine Spirotetronates: Biosynthetic Edifices That Inspire Drug Discovery
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(4), 232; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17040232 - 19 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Spirotetronates are actinomyces-derived polyketides that possess complex structures and exhibit potent and unexplored bioactivities. Due to their anticancer and antimicrobial properties, they have potential as drug hits and deserve further study. In particular, abyssomicin C and tetrocarcin A have shown significant promise against [...] Read more.
Spirotetronates are actinomyces-derived polyketides that possess complex structures and exhibit potent and unexplored bioactivities. Due to their anticancer and antimicrobial properties, they have potential as drug hits and deserve further study. In particular, abyssomicin C and tetrocarcin A have shown significant promise against antibiotic-resistant S. aureus and tuberculosis, as well as for the treatment of various lymphomas and solid tumors. Improved synthetic routes to these compounds, particularly the class II spirotetronates, are needed to access sufficient quantities for structure optimization and clinical applications. Full article
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