Special Issue "Bioactive Molecules from Marine Microorganisms"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Hanna Mazur-Marzec
Website
Guest Editor
1. Division of Marine Biotechnology, Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdańsk, Marszałka J. Piłsudskiego 46, PL-81378 Gdynia, Poland
2. Laboratory of Marine Biochemistry, Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Powstańców Warszawy 55, PL-81712 Sopot, Poland
Interests: bioactive natural products; marine drugs; nonribosomal peptides structure and activity; cyanobacteria toxins; peptidomics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Anna Toruńska-Sitarz
Website
Guest Editor
Division of Marine Biotechnology, Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdańsk, , Marszałka J. Piłsudskiego 46, PL-81378 Gdynia, Poland
Interests: marine microbes; bioactive natural products; marine drugs; nonribosomal peptides; antibacterial activity; molecular ecology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, and microalgae, represent an untapped source of bioactive metabolites. Considering their great metabolic diversity and the fact that only a small fraction of all marine microorganisms has been identified, many products are still waiting to be discovered. These compounds not only help the microorganisms to survive in different conditions and habitats, but they can also be used as templates for the development of new pharmaceuticals, and as components of cosmeceuticals, nutraceuticals, and other health-related products. Among the effects most frequently attributed to natural products of marine microorganisms, cytotoxic, anticoagulant, antibacterial, antiviral, neurotoxic, and immune-modulating activities have been observed.

This Special Issue aims to collect papers on the most recent findings in the field of “Bioactive Molecules from Marine Microorganisms”. We are interested in new data on the source organisms and biosynthetic pathways of the bioactive metabolites and their chemical structures, biological activity, mode of action, isolation, and alternative methods of production as well as biotechnological potential, especially as medical agents. Comprehensive review papers that present up-to-date knowledge on bioactive products from marine microorganisms are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Hanna Mazur-Marzec
Dr. Anna Toruńska-Sitarz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine microorganisms
  • natural products
  • biosynthesis
  • genome mining
  • biological activity
  • structure elucidation
  • bioprospecting
  • bacteria
  • fungi
  • actinomycetes
  • cyanobacteria
  • microalgae

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Bioactive Indolyl Diketopiperazines from the Marine Derived Endophytic Aspergillus versicolor DY180635
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(7), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18070338 - 28 Jun 2020
Abstract
Four new indolyl diketopiperazines, aspamides A–E (14) and two new diketopiperazines, aspamides F–G (5–6), along with 11 known diketopiperazines and intermediates were isolated from the solid culture of Aspergillus versicolor, which is an endophyte with the [...] Read more.
Four new indolyl diketopiperazines, aspamides A–E (14) and two new diketopiperazines, aspamides F–G (5–6), along with 11 known diketopiperazines and intermediates were isolated from the solid culture of Aspergillus versicolor, which is an endophyte with the sea crab (Chiromantes haematocheir). Further chiral high-performance liquid chromatography resolution gave enantiomers (+)- and (−)-4, respectively. The structures and absolute configurations of compounds 16 were determined by the comprehensive analyses of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS), and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) calculation. All isolated compounds were selected for the virtual screening on the coronavirus 3-chymoretpsin-like protease (Mpro) of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the docking scores of compounds 12, 5, 6, 8 and 17 were top among all screened molecules, may be helpful in fighting with Corona Virus Disease-19 (COVID-19) after further studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Molecules from Marine Microorganisms)
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Open AccessArticle
Bioactive Molecules from Mangrove Streptomyces qinglanensis 172205
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(5), 255; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18050255 - 13 May 2020
Abstract
Five new compounds 15R-17,18-dehydroxantholipin (1), (3E,5E,7E)-3-methyldeca-3,5,7-triene-2,9-dione (2) and qinlactone A–C (35) were identified from mangrove Streptomyces qinglanensis 172205 with “genetic dereplication,” which deleted the highly expressed secondary [...] Read more.
Five new compounds 15R-17,18-dehydroxantholipin (1), (3E,5E,7E)-3-methyldeca-3,5,7-triene-2,9-dione (2) and qinlactone A–C (35) were identified from mangrove Streptomyces qinglanensis 172205 with “genetic dereplication,” which deleted the highly expressed secondary metabolite-enterocin biosynthetic gene cluster. The chemical structures were established by spectroscopic methods, and the absolute configurations were determined by electronic circular dichroism (ECD). Compound 1 exhibited strong anti-microbial and antiproliferative bioactivities, while compounds 24 showed weak antiproliferative activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Molecules from Marine Microorganisms)
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Open AccessCommunication
Lysophosphatidylcholines and Chlorophyll-Derived Molecules from the Diatom Cylindrotheca closterium with Anti-Inflammatory Activity
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(3), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18030166 - 17 Mar 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Microalgae have been shown to be excellent producers of lipids, pigments, carbohydrates, and a plethora of secondary metabolites with possible applications in the pharmacological, nutraceutical, and cosmeceutical sectors. Recently, various microalgal raw extracts have been found to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, [...] Read more.
Microalgae have been shown to be excellent producers of lipids, pigments, carbohydrates, and a plethora of secondary metabolites with possible applications in the pharmacological, nutraceutical, and cosmeceutical sectors. Recently, various microalgal raw extracts have been found to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we performed the fractionation of raw extracts of the diatom Cylindrotheca closterium, previously shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, obtaining five fractions. Fractions C and D were found to significantly inhibit tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-⍺) release in LPS-stimulated human monocyte THP-1 cells. A dereplication analysis of these two fractions allowed the identification of their main components. Our data suggest that lysophosphatidylcholines and a breakdown product of chlorophyll, pheophorbide a, were probably responsible for the observed anti-inflammatory activity. Pheophorbide a is known to have anti-inflammatory properties. We tested and confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of 1-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the most abundant lysophosphatidylcholine found in fraction C. This study demonstrated the importance of proper dereplication of bioactive extracts and fractions before isolation of compounds is commenced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Molecules from Marine Microorganisms)
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Open AccessArticle
Cytotoxic Thiodiketopiperazine Derivatives from the Deep Sea-Derived Fungus Epicoccum nigrum SD-388
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(3), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18030160 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
Four new thiodiketopiperazine alkaloids, namely, 5’-hydroxy-6’-ene-epicoccin G (1), 7-methoxy-7’-hydroxyepicoccin G (2), 8’-acetoxyepicoccin D (3), and 7’-demethoxyrostratin C (4), as well as a pair of new enantiomeric diketopiperazines, (±)-5-hydroxydiphenylalazine A (5), along with five [...] Read more.
Four new thiodiketopiperazine alkaloids, namely, 5’-hydroxy-6’-ene-epicoccin G (1), 7-methoxy-7’-hydroxyepicoccin G (2), 8’-acetoxyepicoccin D (3), and 7’-demethoxyrostratin C (4), as well as a pair of new enantiomeric diketopiperazines, (±)-5-hydroxydiphenylalazine A (5), along with five known analogues (610), were isolated and identified from the culture extract of Epicoccum nigrum SD-388, a fungus obtained from deep-sea sediments (−4500 m). Their structures were established on the basis of detailed interpretation of the NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric data. X-ray crystallographic analysis confirmed the structures and established the absolute configurations of compounds 13, while the absolute configurations for compounds 4 and 5 were determined by ECD calculations. Compounds 4 and 10 showed potent activity against Huh7.5 liver tumor cells, which were comparable to that of the positive control, sorafenib, and the disulfide bridge at C-2/C-2’ is likely essential for the activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Molecules from Marine Microorganisms)
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Open AccessArticle
New Thiodiketopiperazine and 3,4-Dihydroisocoumarin Derivatives from the Marine-Derived Fungus Aspergillus terreus
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(3), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18030132 - 26 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Aspergillus terreus has been reported to produce many secondary metabolites that exhibit potential bioactivities, such as antibiotic, hypoglycemic, and lipid-lowering activities. In the present study, two new thiodiketopiperazines, emestrins L (1) and M (2), together with five known analogues [...] Read more.
Aspergillus terreus has been reported to produce many secondary metabolites that exhibit potential bioactivities, such as antibiotic, hypoglycemic, and lipid-lowering activities. In the present study, two new thiodiketopiperazines, emestrins L (1) and M (2), together with five known analogues (37), and five known dihydroisocoumarins (812), were obtained from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus terreus RA2905. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by analysis of the comprehensive spectroscopic data, including high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HRESIMS), one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) data. This is the first time that the spectroscopic data of compounds 3, 8, and 9 have been reported. Compound 3 displayed antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 32 μg/mL) and antifungal activity against Candida albicans (MIC = 32 μg/mL). In addition, compound 3 exhibited an inhibitory effect on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 B (PTP1B), an important hypoglycemic target, with an inhibitory concentration (IC)50 value of 12.25 μM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Molecules from Marine Microorganisms)
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