Special Issue "Feature Papers in Marine Biology"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesco Tiralongo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: marine biology; conservation biology; fish ecology; fishery research; non-indigenous fish; citizen science; taxonomy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Gioele Capillo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, Polo Universitario dell'Annunziata, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: biodiversity; environmental conservation; fish respiration; fish immunology; marine zoology; zoomorphology; aquaculture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Armando Macali
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecological and Biological Sciences, Ichthyogenic Experimental Marine Centre (CISMAR), Borgo Le Saline, Tuscia University, 01016 Tarquinia, Italy
Interests: marine ecology; plankton ecology; ecology and evolution; conservation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the launch of a new Special Issue on “Feature Papers in Marine Biology” with the aim to contribute to the publication of high-quality research on all the main aspects of marine biology, from strictly biological aspects (biological oceanography, animal biology, cellular biology) to ecology, zoology, fisheries, conservation, biological invasions, and molecular biology. Original and high-quality research on all the branches of marine biology mentioned above is encouraged.

Dr. Francesco Tiralongo
Dr. Gioele Capillo
Dr. Armando Macali
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine biology
  • Marine ecology
  • Marine zoology
  • Fisheries
  • Conservation
  • Biological invasions in the marine environment
  • Molecular biology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Pumping Rate and Size of Demosponges—Towards an Understanding Using Modeling
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(11), 1308; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9111308 - 22 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Filter-feeding sponges pump large amounts of water and contribute significantly to grazing impact, matter transport and nutrient cycling in many marine benthic communities. For ecological studies it is therefore of interest to be able to estimate the pumping rate of different species from [...] Read more.
Filter-feeding sponges pump large amounts of water and contribute significantly to grazing impact, matter transport and nutrient cycling in many marine benthic communities. For ecological studies it is therefore of interest to be able to estimate the pumping rate of different species from their volume size or osculum cross-sectional area by means of experimentally determined allometric correlations. To help understand allometric data correlations and observed large variations of volume-specific pumping rate among species we developed a model that determines the pumping rate as a function of the size (volume) of a tubular-type demosponge described by 4 geometric length scales. The model relies on a choanocyte-pump model and standard pressure loss relations for flow through the aquiferous system, and density and pumping rate per choanocyte is assumed to be constant. By selecting different possibilities for increase of the length scales, which may also simulate different growth forms, we demonstrate that the model can imitate the experimental allometric correlations. It is concluded that the observed dependence of pumping rate on size is primarily governed by the hydraulics of pump performance and pressure losses of the aquiferous system rather than, e.g., decreasing density of choanocytes with increasing sponge size. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Marine Biology)
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Article
Vertebrate Palaeoecology of the Pisco Formation (Miocene, Peru): Glimpses into the Ancient Humboldt Current Ecosystem
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(11), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9111188 - 27 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1028
Abstract
The northward-flowing Humboldt Current hosts perpetually high levels of productivity along the western coast of South America. Here, we aim to elucidate the deep-time history of this globally important ecosystem based on a detailed palaeoecological analysis of the exceptionally preserved middle–upper Miocene vertebrate [...] Read more.
The northward-flowing Humboldt Current hosts perpetually high levels of productivity along the western coast of South America. Here, we aim to elucidate the deep-time history of this globally important ecosystem based on a detailed palaeoecological analysis of the exceptionally preserved middle–upper Miocene vertebrate assemblages of the Pisco Formation of the East Pisco Basin, southern Peru. We summarise observations on hundreds of fossil whales, dolphins, seals, seabirds, turtles, crocodiles, sharks, rays, and bony fishes to reconstruct ecological relationships in the wake of the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum, and the marked cooling that followed it. The lowermost, middle Miocene Pisco sequence (P0) and its vertebrate assemblage testify to a warm, semi-enclosed, near-shore palaeoenvironment. During the first part of the Tortonian (P1), high productivity within a prominent upwelling system supported a diverse assemblage of mesopredators, at least some of which permanently resided in the Pisco embayment and used it as a nursery or breeding/calving area. Younger portions of the Pisco Formation (P2) reveal a more open setting, with wide-ranging species like rorquals increasingly dominating the vertebrate assemblage, but also local differences reflecting distance from the coast. Like today, these ancient precursors of the modern Humboldt Current Ecosystem were based on sardines, but notably differed from their present-day equivalent in being dominated by extremely large-bodied apex predators like Livyatan melvillei and Carcharocles megalodon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Marine Biology)
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Article
Four-Year Temporal Study of an Intertidal Artificial Structure in the English Channel
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(11), 1174; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9111174 - 26 Oct 2021
Viewed by 332
Abstract
An experimental artificial structure was deployed in March 2014 on the intertidal zone of the Bay of Seine (eastern part of the English Channel), at intervals of one year until April 2018, i.e., from February 2015 onwards, two blocks were collected in April [...] Read more.
An experimental artificial structure was deployed in March 2014 on the intertidal zone of the Bay of Seine (eastern part of the English Channel), at intervals of one year until April 2018, i.e., from February 2015 onwards, two blocks were collected in April each year. This study provides an inventory of sessile and motile invertebrates living on the artificial hard-bottom and describes the stages of colonization and succession during the four-year study. A total of 84 taxa were identified including 13 sessile and 71 motile taxa. For the sessile fauna, only two taxa Balanus crenatus and Mytilus edulis had colonised the blocks in 2014, and the Taxonomic Richness (TR) was relatively stable during the next three years (between 8 and 10 taxa). The TR of the motile fauna showed an increase between 2014 (5 taxa) and 2015 (34 taxa), and then decreased from 54 taxa in 2017 to 29 taxa in 2018. The abundance of the sessile fauna was very high in 2014 due to the rapid settlement of the barnacle Balanus crenatus, which remained the dominant species throughout the study. Another barnacle Perforatus perforatus, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and three ascidians including two non-indigenous species Perophora japonica and Corella eumyota, and Molgula sp. were also among the dominant taxa of the sessile fauna. In April 2014, the dominant motile taxa was the decapod Carcinus maenas juvenile, then in 2015 the fauna became dominated by pioneer taxa such as the amphipod of the genus Monocorophium and the tanaid Zeuxo holdichi. A reduction of mean abundance was observed in the last three years of the study, combined with diversification of the dominant species especially those of small size such as Peracarida. The study shows that the colonization of such blocks deployed on oyster tables in the intertidal zone is efficient to test the ability of building material to be colonized in this transition zone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Marine Biology)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Restocked dusky groupers’ movements in a Northeast Atlantic coastal Marine Protected Area

Ana Filipa Silva 1,*, Bárbara Horta e Costa 2, José Lino Costa 1,3, Esmeralda Pereira 4, João Pedro Marques 1, João Castro 4, Pedro Lino 5, Ana Mendes 5, Pedro Pousão Ferreira 5,Luís Bentes 2, Jorge Gonçalves 2, Pedro Raposo de Almeida 4,6, Bernardo Ruivo Quintella 1,3,*

1 MARE – Centro de Ciências do Mar e do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, [email protected], [email protected],  [email protected], [email protected]

2 CCMAR – Centro de Ciências do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, [email protected], [email protected], [email protected]

3 Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa

4 MARE – Centro de Ciências do Mar e do Ambiente, Universidade de Évora, [email protected], [email protected], [email protected]

5 IPMA – Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera, [email protected],  [email protected], [email protected]

6 Departamento de Biologia, Escola de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade de Évora

* Correspondence: [email protected], [email protected]

Abstract: No-take areas are key instruments to promote the effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPA), particularly on what concerns the protection of endangered species like dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus). However, despite the establishment of no-take areas and the prohibition of capturing this species since 2011 in a southwestern Portuguese MPA (SACVMP – Sudoeste Alentejano’ and ‘Costa Vicentina’ Marine Park), there is still no evidence of the population recovery. By using acoustic biotelemetry this work aimed to evaluate the feasibility of restocking hatchery-reared adult dusky groupers in two no-take areas within the SACVMP. Between 2019 and 2021 thirty groupers were tagged with acoustic transmitters and their movements and residency to the releasing sites - no-take areas - assessed. No fish settled down in either of the areas, however, some individuals displayed extended movements of more than hundred kilometers along the Portuguese coast which had never been reported for this species. Those movements were performed quite near the shore, evidencing the importance of coastal MPA to secure possible ecological corridors. Also, groupers dispersed more actively during dusk and night. Following studies should focus on the promotors of hatchery-reared dusky groupers site fidelity, so that future large scale restocking programs could be successful in MPA with appropriate habitat.

 Keywords: Acoustic biotelemetry, Dispersal behaviour, Epinephelus marginatus, no-take areas, Restocking

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