Special Issue "Biological Invasions in a Changing World, from Biodiversity Assessment to Ecosystem Functions"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity Loss & Dynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2022) | Viewed by 3187

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cataldo Pierri
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Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy
Interests: marine alien species; structural and functional marine biodiversity; conservation biology; marine biocostructions; marine fouling; marine invertebrate rearing
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Dr. Armando Macali
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecological and Biological Sciences, Ichthyogenic Experimental Marine Centre (CISMAR), Borgo Le Saline, Tuscia University, 01016 Tarquinia, Italy
Interests: marine ecology; plankton ecology; ecology and evolution; conservation
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Dr. Andrea Bonifazi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 00133 Rome, Italy
Interests: benthos; Sabellaria; non indigenous species; marine benthic species
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In marine ecosystems, there are more and more reports of new alien species, especially in transitional environments where human activities are more intense, outlining routes and introduction pathways that often see fouling communities as a fertile ground for invasions. The vulnerability of the habitats, the ecological and biological drivers that favor the success of the newcomers, and the responses to the invasions of the native community represent the challenges to be faced. Novel environments offer novel opportunities, and plasticity may represent a significant advantage when dealing with new challenges. Invaders are a non-random subset of the source population, and individual differences have substantial ecological and evolutionary importance, also playing a key role in biological invasions.

A macro-ecological approach to biological invasions can provide useful information on the relationship between alien invasions and biological responses; comparative studies between invader and closely related native species can reveal functional traits involved in the invasion success; when native and invader species live sympatrically, ecological studies can be carried out with an improved resolution.

In this Special Issue, we invite the submission of contributions that address the alien issue in aquatic ecosystems from multiple points of view, including specific interactions, adaptation, patterns of introduction and expansion, responses of biological communities, influence on ecosystem functions and services, etc.

Dr. Cataldo Pierri
Dr. Armando Macali
Dr. Andrea Bonifazi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Invasion of the Land of Samurai: Potential Spread of Old-World Screwworm to Japan under Climate Change
Diversity 2022, 14(2), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14020099 - 30 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1776
Abstract
Temperatures have fluctuated dramatically throughout our planet’s long history, and in recent decades, global warming has become a more visible indicator of climate change. Climate change has several effects on different economic sectors, especially the livestock industry. The Old-world screwworm (OWS), Chrysomya bezziana [...] Read more.
Temperatures have fluctuated dramatically throughout our planet’s long history, and in recent decades, global warming has become a more visible indicator of climate change. Climate change has several effects on different economic sectors, especially the livestock industry. The Old-world screwworm (OWS), Chrysomya bezziana (Villeneuve, 1914), is one of the most destructive insect pests which is invading new regions as a result of climate change. The economic loss in livestock business due to invasion of OWS was previously assessed by FAO in Iraq to be USD 8,555,000. Other areas at risk of invasion with OWS in the future include Japan. Therefore, maximum entropy implemented in MaxEnt was used to model predictive risk maps of OWS invasion to Japan based on two representative concentration pathways (RCPs), 2.6 and 8.5, for 2050 and 2070. The Area Under Curve (AUC) indicates high model performance, with a value equal to 0.89 (±0.001). In addition, the True Skill Statistics (TSS) value was equal to 0.7. The resulting models indicate the unsuitability of the northern territory of Japan for invasion by OWS. The main island’s southern costs show high and very high invasion suitability, respectively, and both Kyushu and Okinawa are at high risk of invasion with OWS. The predicted risk maps can be considered a warning sign for the Japanese quarantine authority to hasten a control program in order to protect the livestock industry from this devastating pest. Full article
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The Spreading in Europe of the Non-Indigenous Species Oenothera speciosa Nutt. Might Be a Threat to the Autochthonous Moth Macroglossum stellatarum (Linnaeus, 1758)? A New Case Study from Italy
Diversity 2022, 14(9), 743; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14090743 - 09 Sep 2022
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Abstract
Oenothera speciosa Nutt. is a non-indigenous plant that is widespread in Europe, South America, Asia, and Oceania. Although in its native range it is rarely pollinated by sphingid moths, in Europe and Asia, it was found to be associated with the hummingbird hawkmoth [...] Read more.
Oenothera speciosa Nutt. is a non-indigenous plant that is widespread in Europe, South America, Asia, and Oceania. Although in its native range it is rarely pollinated by sphingid moths, in Europe and Asia, it was found to be associated with the hummingbird hawkmoth Macroglossum stellatarum (Linnaeus, 1758). However, the plant–insect interaction was negative, and the moths were found with proboscides stuck to the flowers of this plant. This interaction is a relevant conservation issue that requires further studies to assess its ecological impact. This work represents the first record of the negative interaction between O. speciosa and M. stellatarum in Italy. Full article
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