Special Issue "Coastal Fish Research II"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2022 | Viewed by 6482

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Francesco Tiralongo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Science, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: marine biology; conservation biology; fish ecology; fishery research; non-indigenous fish
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal fish are important components of marine ecosystems. Furthermore, some species are the most important economic resources for the majority of professional and recreational fishing activities. On the other hand, other species represent serious threats for marine ecosystems, the economy and, in some cases, human health. These latter species are known as invasive alien species (IAS). The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish quality and impactful research articles with respect to several aspects of fish biology and ecology, also including commercial species, the impact of fishery on coastal fish communities, and biological invasion by non-indigenous fish species. Original and high-quality research directly related to the various aspects mentioned above is encouraged.

Dr. Francesco Tiralongo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coastal fish species
  • Coastal fisheries
  • Commercial fish species
  • Non-indigenous fish
  • Fish biology and ecology

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
First Estimates of Age and Growth of the Lusitanian Cownose Ray (Rhinoptera marginata) from the Mediterranean Sea
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(5), 685; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10050685 - 18 May 2022
Viewed by 435
Abstract
Within the eastern Mediterranean, increased fishing pressure coupled with a lack of basic biological information is threatening the sustainability of the rare Lusitanian cownose ray (Rhinoptera marginata). To provide baseline life-history data for this species, age estimates were obtained from vertebral [...] Read more.
Within the eastern Mediterranean, increased fishing pressure coupled with a lack of basic biological information is threatening the sustainability of the rare Lusitanian cownose ray (Rhinoptera marginata). To provide baseline life-history data for this species, age estimates were obtained from vertebral band counts of 224 rays (size range: 210–998 mm disc width and 140 to 13,600 g weight) collected from Iskenderun Bay. Females ranged in size from 210 to 998 mm disc width and 238 to 13,600 g weight, while males ranged from 130 to 866 mm disc width and 140 to 8250 g weight. The index of average percent error (2.8%) and age-bias plot suggest that the aging method used represents a precise and non-biased approach. Marginal increment analysis indicated that a single opaque band is deposited annually between August and September. The oldest ages obtained for R. marginata were 9 years for males and 19 years for females, which corresponded to total lengths of 866 and 998 mm disc width, respectively. For males, limited samples prevented the accurate calculation of growth rates; however, for combined sexes, observed and disc width-at-age data resulted in the following von Bertalanffy growth parameters: DW = 1102.16 mm, k = 0.148 and t0 = −0.2167. Although additional samples are necessary to determine growth rates in males, the results of the present study indicate that R. marginata females exhibit life history characteristics similar to other Rhinoptera species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Fish Research II)
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Article
Microplastics in the Deep: Comparing Dietary and Plastic Ingestion Data between Two Mediterranean Bathyal Opportunistic Feeder Species, Galeus melastomus, Rafinesque, 1810 and Coelorinchus caelorhincus (Risso, 1810), through Stomach Content Analysis
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(5), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10050624 - 02 May 2022
Viewed by 581
Abstract
Marine plastic pollution is currently an issue of mounting concern around the world. Stomach content of marine fish has been increasingly used as a valid proxy for detecting the presence of such a pollutant in marine biota, both for coastal and deep-water environments. [...] Read more.
Marine plastic pollution is currently an issue of mounting concern around the world. Stomach content of marine fish has been increasingly used as a valid proxy for detecting the presence of such a pollutant in marine biota, both for coastal and deep-water environments. Although ingestion of microplastics has been reported in an increasing number of species, the patterns of ingestion still remain unclear, depending closely on the interaction between the species and types of microplastics involved. In this context, we analysed and compared the stomach contents of two bathyal dwelling opportunistic feeder species namely Galeus melastomus and Coelorinchus caelorhincus. In particular, we analysed microplastic items according to their dimension, morphology and colour, and diet’s variation with size obtained through prey identification. Both species showed a higher frequency of occurrence of the blue filament-like middle-sized microplastics (1.01–4.75 mm) compared with the other categories, although this pattern was much more marked in C. caelorhincus than in G. melastomus. The latter conversely showed a larger array of ingested plastic items in terms of shape and colour. Matching plastic ingestion with dietary data suggested potential predator confusion occurring in C. caelorhincus through active mis-selection of a defined type of microplastic instead of some particular family of polychaetes, which resemble in shape, size, and color to that type. Otherwise, G. melastomus appeared more prone to a random ingestion of a larger array of microplastic items because of a more generalistic and less selective feeding strategy. Although further validation is needed, stomach contents of the two species showed evidence strong enough to be considered as potential bioindicator species of microplastic pollution, as required by the Marine Strategy Framework Directive for monitoring this pollutant in the marine environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Fish Research II)
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Article
Estimation of Stock Status Using the LBB and CMSY Methods for the Indian Salmon Leptomelanosoma indicum (Shaw, 1804) in the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(3), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10030366 - 04 Mar 2022
Viewed by 683
Abstract
As one of the largest and most commercially valuable finfish species, Leptomelanosomaindicum (Indian salmon) significantly contributes to Bangladesh’s marine catches. The length-based Bayesian biomass (LBB) method and catch-based Monte Carlo method (CMSY) are among the most recent and powerful methods for predicting [...] Read more.
As one of the largest and most commercially valuable finfish species, Leptomelanosomaindicum (Indian salmon) significantly contributes to Bangladesh’s marine catches. The length-based Bayesian biomass (LBB) method and catch-based Monte Carlo method (CMSY) are among the most recent and powerful methods for predicting the state of fisheries resources from data-limited fisheries. CMSY requires catch and resilience data, as well as quantitative stock status information. For LBB, only length–frequency (LF) data are required. The stock status of L. indicum was estimated using these two independent methods, utilizing twenty-one years of catch–effort and length–frequency data (978 individuals) from commercial fisheries on the Bangladesh coast. Here, a BSM (Bayesian state-space implementation of the Schaefer surplus production model) was also employed. The current study’s findings showed that the B/B0 ratio of currently exploited biomass to unexploited biomass (0.1) was smaller than BMSY/B0 (0.36) and B/BMSY = 0.28 was smaller than the reference value of 1.0, indicating the grossly overfished and depleted condition of the stock. Similar trends in the results were found for B/BMSY = 0.11 (<1.0) from CMSY. In addition, the exploitation rate (F/FMSY = 5.66), biomass (B < BMSY), and fishing status (F > FMSY) further justify the severely overfished conditions of L. indicum stock in the study area. Furthermore, the Lc_opt (optimal length at first capture) was higher than the Lc (length at first capture), indicating that this species is being overfished, and that mesh sizes should be increased for better management. This study provides information on biological reference points (BRPs), and confirms the severely overfished status of L. indicum in the coastal waters of Bangladesh. More specific and prompt management measures are required to recover and sustainably manage this valuable species, and protect the fish stock from commercial extinction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Fish Research II)
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Article
Meridionalization as a Possible Resource for Fisheries: The Case Study of Caranx rhonchus Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1817, in Southern Italian Waters
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(2), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10020274 - 16 Feb 2022
Viewed by 629
Abstract
Climate change affects the shift range distribution of species, especially among mobile species, and this phenomenon can alter ecosystems and impacts human activities. Fishing is an anthropic activity that undergoes the effect not only of the introduction and increase of non-native species but [...] Read more.
Climate change affects the shift range distribution of species, especially among mobile species, and this phenomenon can alter ecosystems and impacts human activities. Fishing is an anthropic activity that undergoes the effect not only of the introduction and increase of non-native species but also of native thermophilic ones. Some of these species can become a commercially exploitable resource. However, this information is often obscured by the negative effects these species can cause to the environment. We investigated how the thermophilic species Caranx rhonchus, neglected in Italy, could become a relevant resource. We studied the nutritional profile and the presence of heavy metal contamination and compared these traits with those of a similar common Mediterranean species, namely Trachurus trachurus. The proximate composition was determined following the AOAC procedure, while the fatty acid profile was determined by GC/MS, and the mineral component was obtained by mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Caranx rhonchus is a nutritionally good species, although it is little consumed and exploited. Increasing the market supply with new commercially exploitable emerging species would benefit local communities and the environment. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate how a shift of the range caused by climate change can provide benefits within the human dimension. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Fish Research II)
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Article
Strengthening Angel Shark Conservation in the Northeastern Mediterranean Sea
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(2), 269; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10020269 - 15 Feb 2022
Viewed by 1352
Abstract
Angel sharks are among the most threatened species of sharks globally. Twenty-two species have been identified globally so far, with three species being present in the Mediterranean Sea: Squatina aculeata, Squatina oculata, and Squatina squatina. The Mediterranean populations of all [...] Read more.
Angel sharks are among the most threatened species of sharks globally. Twenty-two species have been identified globally so far, with three species being present in the Mediterranean Sea: Squatina aculeata, Squatina oculata, and Squatina squatina. The Mediterranean populations of all three species have been assessed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species due to the steep decline of their populations as a result of their historical and current overexploitation by demersal fisheries. Therefore, currently there is an ongoing increasing effort for advancing the conservation of the species in the basin. Recently, in the context of the Regional Action Plan for Mediterranean Angel Sharks, the Aegean Sea and Crete have been identified as critical areas for all three species. This study provides the first predictive distribution map of the three angel shark species in the basin, while critical areas for the conservation of the species were identified through a systematic spatial conservation planning analysis. Our analysis revealed low overlapping between the existing MPA network and critical areas for the distribution of the species primarily in Greece and then Turkey, while 20% of the critical areas for the distribution of the species overlaps with Fisheries Restricted Areas of the region. This highlights the need for creating MPAs focusing on shark conservation within the Mediterranean that are currently completely absent. In addition, we provide policy recommendations that can secure better protection of angel sharks through the enforcement of the current legislations and the engagement of all relevant stakeholders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Fish Research II)
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Article
Fisheries Reference Point and Stock Status of Croaker Fishery (Sciaenidae) Exploited from the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(1), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10010063 - 05 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 354
Abstract
This research evaluated fisheries reference points and stock status to assess the sustainability of the croaker fishery (Sciaenidae) from the Bay of Bengal (BoB), Bangladesh. Sixteen years (2001–2016) of catch-effort data were analyzed using two surplus production models (Schaefer and Fox), the Monte [...] Read more.
This research evaluated fisheries reference points and stock status to assess the sustainability of the croaker fishery (Sciaenidae) from the Bay of Bengal (BoB), Bangladesh. Sixteen years (2001–2016) of catch-effort data were analyzed using two surplus production models (Schaefer and Fox), the Monte Carlo method (CMSY) and the Bayesian state-space Schaefer surplus production model (BSM) method. This research applies a Stock–Production Model Incorporating Covariates (ASPIC) software package to run the Schaefer and Fox model. The maximum sustainable yield (MSY) produced by all models ranged from 33,900 to 35,900 metric tons (mt), which is very close to last year’s catch (33,768 mt in 2016). The estimated B > BMSY and F < FMSY indicated the safe biomass and fishing status. The calculated F/FMSY was 0.89, 0.87, and 0.81, and B/BMSY was 1.05, 1.07, and 1.14 for Fox, Schaefer, and BSM, respectively, indicating the fully exploited status of croaker stock in the BoB, Bangladesh. The representation of the Kobe phase plot suggested that the exploitation of croaker stock started from the yellow (unsustainable) quadrant in 2001 and gradually moved to the green (sustainable) quadrant in 2016 because of the reduction in fishing efforts and safe fishing pressure after 2012. Thus, this research suggests that the current fishing pressure needs to be maintained so that the yearly catch does not exceed the MSY limit of croaker. Additionally, specific management measures should implement to guarantee croaker and other fisheries from the BoB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Fish Research II)
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Article
Biological and Ecological Aspects of the Blackmouth Catshark (Galeus melastomus Rafinesque, 1810) in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(9), 967; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9090967 - 06 Sep 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1165
Abstract
Data on the biology and ecology of Galeus melastomus are old/absent for the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, despite there being numerous studies in the wider area. A total of 127 specimens of G. melastomus from the southern Tyrrhenian Sea, collected in 2018–2019 using trawling [...] Read more.
Data on the biology and ecology of Galeus melastomus are old/absent for the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, despite there being numerous studies in the wider area. A total of 127 specimens of G. melastomus from the southern Tyrrhenian Sea, collected in 2018–2019 using trawling nets, were analyzed to investigate size at sexual maturity, sex ratio, length–weight relationships, and feeding habits. To our best knowledge, this is the first time in which all these features were investigated in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea for G. melastomus. The stomach content analysis showed that G. melastomus had intermediate feeding habits, preying on a great variety of species, especially Cephalopoda, Osteichthyes, and Crustacea. The Levin’s index value (Bi) was 0.53. Sex ratio was 0.92:1, with females slightly more abundant and bigger than males. The results also showed a decrease (33.7 cm for females, 31.1 cm for males) in length at 50% maturity (L50). This could be a result of anthropogenic stressors, such as overfishing and/or and environmental changes, which can induce physiological responses in several species. Our results highlighted the differences related to sexual maturity, growth, and feeding habits of the blackmouth catshark in the studied area, providing reference data to allow comparison with future studies on this species adaptations to this and other deep-sea areas in the Mediterranean Sea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Fish Research II)
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