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Special Issue "Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactives and Nutraceuticals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. David Arráez-Román

1. Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, Avda Fuentenueva s/n, Granada 18071, Spain
2. Research and Development of Functional Food Centre (CIDAF), Health Science Technological Park (PTS) Granada, Avda. del Conocimiento s/n, EdificioBioregión, Granada 18007, Spain
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Phone: +34-958242869
Fax: +34-958243328
Interests: bioactive phenolic compounds; metabolomics; analytical techniques; extraction processes; plant and food analysis; bioavailability
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ana Mª Gomez-Caravaca

Department of Analytical Chemistry - University of Granada. Campus of Fuentenueva, Avda Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34 958 637206
Fax: +34 958 637083
Interests: Antioxidant compounds; mass spectrometry; food by-products; functional foods; nutraceuticals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant and food analysis is continuously demanding the development of more robust, efficient, sensitive, and cost-effective analytical methodologies to guarantee the safety, quality, and traceability of foods in compliance with legislation and consumers’ demands. Thus, it is of great interest the research about novel technologies used in plant and food analysis of bioactive compunds including an in-depth analysis of several specific approaches, and an examination of the most innovative applications and future trends.

This Special Issue, “Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis”, will cover a selection of recent research topics and current review articles related to the use of, mainly, “green” extraction process for extracting bioactive compounds from matrices such as plants, food or food by-products and their characterization by advanced separative techniques. We are particularly interested in articles describing new analytical strategies to determine bioactive compounds in plants, food and food by-products with selected applications related to current trends in food chemistry.

Prof. Dr. David Arráez-Román
Dr. Ana Maria Gómez Caravaca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Extraction processes, mainly “green” technologies
  • Analytical techniques, such as CE, LC, GC, coupled to different detection systems
  • Bioactive compunds
  • Food and by-products
  • Medicinal plants

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Comparison of Two Stationary Phases for the Determination of Phytosterols and Tocopherols in Mango and Its By-Products by GC-QTOF-MS
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(7), 1594; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18071594
Received: 1 June 2017 / Revised: 18 July 2017 / Accepted: 19 July 2017 / Published: 22 July 2017
PDF Full-text (517 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Two different gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOF-MS) methodologies were carried out for the analysis of phytosterols and tocopherols in the flesh of three mango cultivars and their by-products (pulp, peel, and seed). To that end, a non-polar column [...] Read more.
Two different gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOF-MS) methodologies were carried out for the analysis of phytosterols and tocopherols in the flesh of three mango cultivars and their by-products (pulp, peel, and seed). To that end, a non-polar column ((5%-phenyl)-methylpolysiloxane (HP-5ms)) and a mid-polar column (crossbond trifluoropropylmethyl polysiloxane (RTX-200MS)) were used. The analysis time for RTX-200MS was much lower than the one obtained with HP-5ms. Furthermore, the optimized method for the RTX-200MS column had a higher sensibility and precision of peak area than the HP-5ms methodology. However, RTX-200MS produced an overlapping between β-sitosterol and Δ5-avenasterol. Four phytosterols and two tocopherols were identified in mango samples. As far as we are concerned, this is the first time that phytosterols have been studied in mango peel and that Δ5-avenasterol has been reported in mango pulp. α- and γ-tocopherol were determined in peel, and α-tocopherol was the major tocopherol in this fraction (up to 81.2%); however, only α-tocopherol was determined in the pulp and seed. The peel was the fraction with the highest total concentration of phytosterols followed by seed and pulp, and “Sensación” was the cultivar with the highest concentration of total phytosterols in most cases. There were no significant differences between quantification of tocopherols with both columns. However, in most cases, quantification of phytosterols was higher with RTX-200MS than with HP-5ms column. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle Simplifying the Preparation of Pollen Grains for MALDI-TOF MS Classification
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(3), 543; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18030543
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 24 February 2017 / Accepted: 27 February 2017 / Published: 3 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2408 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a well-implemented analytical technique for the investigation of complex biological samples. In MS, the sample preparation strategy is decisive for the success of the measurements. Here, sample preparation processes and target [...] Read more.
Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a well-implemented analytical technique for the investigation of complex biological samples. In MS, the sample preparation strategy is decisive for the success of the measurements. Here, sample preparation processes and target materials for the investigation of different pollen grains are compared. A reduced and optimized sample preparation process prior to MALDI-TOF measurement is presented using conductive carbon tape as target. The application of conductive tape yields in enhanced absolute signal intensities and mass spectral pattern information, which leads to a clear separation in subsequent pattern analysis. The results will be used to improve the taxonomic differentiation and identification, and might be useful for the development of a simple routine method to identify pollen based on mass spectrometry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle Application of Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Methods towards the Quality Assessment of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) Rhizomes from Ecological Plantations
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 452; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18020452
Received: 3 February 2017 / Revised: 16 February 2017 / Accepted: 16 February 2017 / Published: 20 February 2017
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (442 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The usefulness of ginger in the food industry and pharmacotherapy is strictly related to its content of various components. The study elucidates the chemical composition of Zingiber officinale rhizomes cultivated on ecological plantations on Shikoku Island (Japan). GC-MS analysis of terpene content, LC-MS [...] Read more.
The usefulness of ginger in the food industry and pharmacotherapy is strictly related to its content of various components. The study elucidates the chemical composition of Zingiber officinale rhizomes cultivated on ecological plantations on Shikoku Island (Japan). GC-MS analysis of terpene content, LC-MS determination of phenolic content, and the determination of 12 elements using AAS spectrometry were performed to give more detailed insight into the samples. Ninety-five percent of terpene composition was elucidated, with zingiberene as the most abundant sesquiterpene (37.9%); the quantification of gingerols and shogaols was performed, showing the highest contribution of 6-gingerol (268.3 mg/kg); a significant K (43,963 mg/kg of dry mass) and Mn (758.4 mg/kg of dry mass) content was determined in the elemental analysis of the rhizomes and low concentration of toxic elements (Cd, Ni and Pb) remaining below the safe level values recommended by European Commission Directives. The main phenolic compound was (6)-gingerol, which is characteristic of fresh rhizomes and is responsible for their taste and aroma. Surprisingly, high amounts of (6)-shogaol were determined, even though this phenolic compound usually occurs in old or processed material and not in fresh rhizomes. Sesquiterpenes were the major fraction of volatiles. The highest concentrations were determined for α-zingiberene, β-sesquiphellandrene, (E,E)-α-farnesene, geranial, and ar-curcumene. The volatiles composition of ginger cultivated on Shikoku Island is specific and strongly differs from plants cultivated in China, Nigeria, or Australia. The elemental composition of ginger rhizomes grown in ecological plantations is more beneficial for human health compared to products grown in normal cultivars, as the products contain high amounts of potassium and manganese and are characterized by low sodium content and lower levels of toxic heavy metals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle In-Depth Two-Year Study of Phenolic Profile Variability among Olive Oils from Autochthonous and Mediterranean Varieties in Morocco, as Revealed by a LC-MS Chemometric Profiling Approach
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18010052
Received: 2 September 2016 / Revised: 22 December 2016 / Accepted: 22 December 2016 / Published: 28 December 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (895 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Olive oil phenolic fraction considerably contributes to the sensory quality and nutritional value of this foodstuff. Herein, the phenolic fraction of 203 olive oil samples extracted from fruits of four autochthonous Moroccan cultivars (“Picholine Marocaine”, “Dahbia”, “Haouzia” and “Menara”), and nine Mediterranean varieties [...] Read more.
Olive oil phenolic fraction considerably contributes to the sensory quality and nutritional value of this foodstuff. Herein, the phenolic fraction of 203 olive oil samples extracted from fruits of four autochthonous Moroccan cultivars (“Picholine Marocaine”, “Dahbia”, “Haouzia” and “Menara”), and nine Mediterranean varieties recently introduced in Morocco (“Arbequina”, “Arbosana”, “Cornicabra”, “Frantoio”, “Hojiblanca”, “Koroneiki”, “Manzanilla”, “Picholine de Languedoc” and “Picual”), were explored over two consecutive crop seasons (2012/2013 and 2013/2014) by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 32 phenolic compounds (and quinic acid), belonging to five chemical classes (secoiridoids, simple phenols, flavonoids, lignans and phenolic acids) were identified and quantified. Phenolic profiling revealed that the determined phenolic compounds showed variety-dependent levels, being, at the same time, significantly affected by the crop season. Moreover, based on the obtained phenolic composition and chemometric linear discriminant analysis, statistical models were obtained allowing a very satisfactory classification and prediction of the varietal origin of the studied oils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle Secondary Metabolites in Ramalina terebrata Detected by UHPLC/ESI/MS/MS and Identification of Parietin as Tau Protein Inhibitor
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(8), 1303; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17081303
Received: 24 June 2016 / Revised: 29 July 2016 / Accepted: 1 August 2016 / Published: 18 August 2016
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (1166 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is an outstanding methodology for fast analysis of phenolic compounds in biological samples. Twenty two compounds were quickly and accurately identified in the methanolic extract of the Antarctic lichen Ramalina terebrata for the first time using ultra [...] Read more.
Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is an outstanding methodology for fast analysis of phenolic compounds in biological samples. Twenty two compounds were quickly and accurately identified in the methanolic extract of the Antarctic lichen Ramalina terebrata for the first time using ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector and high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-PDA-Q/Orbitrap/MS/MS). In addition, the extract and the four compounds isolated from this species were tested for the inhibitory activity of tau protein aggregation, which is a protein involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). All compounds showed null activity with the exception of parietin, which it was able to inhibit aggregation process of tau in a concentration range between 3 µg/mL (10 µM) to 28 µg/mL (100 µM). In addition, we show how parietin interact with tau 306VQIVYK311 hexapeptide inside of the microtubule binding domain (4R) with the help of molecular docking experiments. Finally, the constituents present in the methanolic extract could possibly contribute to the established anti-aggregation activity for this extract and this in-depth analysis of the chemical composition of R. terebrata could guide further research into its medicinal properties and potential uses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Soft-MS and Computational Mapping of Oleuropein
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 992; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18050992
Received: 4 April 2017 / Revised: 1 May 2017 / Accepted: 2 May 2017 / Published: 6 May 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Olive oil and table olives are rich sources of biophenols, which provides a unique taste, aroma and potential health benefits. Specifically, green olive drupes are enriched with oleuropein, a bioactive biophenol secoiridoid. Olive oil contains hydrolytic derivatives such as hydroxytyrosol, oleacein and elenolate [...] Read more.
Olive oil and table olives are rich sources of biophenols, which provides a unique taste, aroma and potential health benefits. Specifically, green olive drupes are enriched with oleuropein, a bioactive biophenol secoiridoid. Olive oil contains hydrolytic derivatives such as hydroxytyrosol, oleacein and elenolate from oleuropein as well as tyrosol and oleocanthal from ligstroside. Biophenol secoiridoids are categorized by the presence of elenoic acid or its derivatives in their molecular structure. Medical studies suggest that olive biophenol secoiridoids could prevent cancer, obesity, osteoporosis, and neurodegeneration. Therefore, understanding the biomolecular dynamics of oleuropein can potentially improve olive-based functional foods and nutraceuticals. This review provides a critical assessment of oleuropein biomolecular mechanism and computational mapping that could contribute to nutrigenomics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis)
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Open AccessReview Natural Antioxidants in Foods and Medicinal Plants: Extraction, Assessment and Resources
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(1), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18010096
Received: 21 October 2016 / Revised: 24 December 2016 / Accepted: 27 December 2016 / Published: 5 January 2017
Cited by 53 | PDF Full-text (694 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Natural antioxidants are widely distributed in food and medicinal plants. These natural antioxidants, especially polyphenols and carotenoids, exhibit a wide range of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, anti-atherosclerosis and anticancer. The effective extraction and proper assessment of antioxidants from food and medicinal plants [...] Read more.
Natural antioxidants are widely distributed in food and medicinal plants. These natural antioxidants, especially polyphenols and carotenoids, exhibit a wide range of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, anti-atherosclerosis and anticancer. The effective extraction and proper assessment of antioxidants from food and medicinal plants are crucial to explore the potential antioxidant sources and promote the application in functional foods, pharmaceuticals and food additives. The present paper provides comprehensive information on the green extraction technologies of natural antioxidants, assessment of antioxidant activity at chemical and cellular based levels and their main resources from food and medicinal plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Techniques in Plant and Food Analysis)
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Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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