Special Issue "Applications of GIScience for Land Administration"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 26061

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mohsen Kalantari
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Spatial Data Infrastructures and Land Administration, Melbourne School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: land administration; digital twin; spatial data infrastructure; geospatial standards
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Gerhard Navratil
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Technical University of Vienna, 1040 Vienna, Austria
Interests: land administration and cadaster; data quality; navigation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The science behind geographic information (GIScience) has evolved in the last 50 years since the first attempts to solve geographical questions with computers. Conference series like GIScience (www.giscience.org) focus purely on the further development of knowledge and technology in the context of geographic information. However, the topic is also addressed at numerous other conferences for communities from spatial planning, geodesy, and photogrammetry to computer science or geography.

Land administration is one of the domains continuously applying new technologies when they become reliable. The period during and after the Napoleonic wars, when different countries in Europe had to replace their outdated systems to collect land tax, marks the beginning of modern land administration. Since then, procedures, equipment, and concepts have been adapted to match the technological status. This is only possible if land administration problems (e.g., in modeling, data collection, or updates) are analyzed and matched with emerging technological innovations. Since land administration is purely focused on geographic information, the developments in GIScience will eventually be applicable to land administration systems.

Aim of the special issue

This Special Issue aims to present the application of innovative concepts from GIScience to land administration. It will bridge the gap between universities and land administration authorities, developed and developing countries, land administration domain experts and GI specialists.

The Special Issue brings together experts from various domains to enhance our mutual understanding and foster interdisciplinary cooperation and discussion.

Topics

In line with the context and aims outlined above, we invite original research contributions on (but not restricted to) the following topics:

  • Developments in 3D modeling and visualization for land administration above and below ground to meet the demands of smart cities
  • Innovative use of and experiences with volunteered geographic information and crowd sourcing in land administration
  • Novel approaches to document and protect indigenous land rights
  • Application of GNSS and remote sensing in land administration
  • Enhancements of land administration models and automation of land administration processes by applying GIScience concepts
  • Application of developing technologies like linked data, NoSQL databases or blockchain technology for land administration
  • Mass appraisal of land value using GIS tools
  • GIScience in support of the Sustainable Development Goals

Dr. Mohsen Kalantari
Dr. Gerhard Navratil
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land administration
  • land rights
  • land value
  • land use
  • 3D
  • maps
  • data collection
  • technology
  • GNSS
  • remote sensing
  • computer science
  • VGI
  • SDGs

Published Papers (18 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Applications of GIScience for Land Administration
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(7), 416; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9070416 - 29 Jun 2020
Viewed by 994
Abstract
Land administration is an essential part of public administration. Geographic Information Science (GIScience) deals with the concepts, principles, and models of geographic information. Land administration has always adopted new technological and scientific developments and thus it is reasonable to check, which results from [...] Read more.
Land administration is an essential part of public administration. Geographic Information Science (GIScience) deals with the concepts, principles, and models of geographic information. Land administration has always adopted new technological and scientific developments and thus it is reasonable to check, which results from GIScience can be used to improve land administration systems. This editorial paper introduces the key research areas for land administration. After that, 12 original papers are presented, which provide a general picture of recent trends in land administration research. This Special Issue shows that land administration as a scientific field is still evolving and adopting to the changing societal needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)

Research

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Article
Managing Inhomogeneity in the Control Point Network during Staking Out Cadastral Boundaries in Austria
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2022, 11(5), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi11050274 - 21 Apr 2022
Viewed by 752
Abstract
The coordinate system of the Austrian cadastre is physically realised through control points provided by the national institution for surveying. Due to historical development over the centuries and changes in measurement technologies, inhomogeneities can occur within the local control point network. These inhomogeneities [...] Read more.
The coordinate system of the Austrian cadastre is physically realised through control points provided by the national institution for surveying. Due to historical development over the centuries and changes in measurement technologies, inhomogeneities can occur within the local control point network. These inhomogeneities affect the derived boundary point coordinates. When staking out boundary points in an area with inhomogeneous control points, deviations from the boundary marks in the field can occur that exceed the accuracy requirements of the ordinance for surveying. Examples show that a suitable approach to tackle this issue has to be selected on a case-based strategy. Different situations might require different approaches. This needs to be considered in the legal framework to enable cadastral experts to select the optimal approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Quantification of Spatial Association between Commercial and Residential Spaces in Beijing Using Urban Big Data
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2022, 11(4), 249; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi11040249 - 11 Apr 2022
Viewed by 713
Abstract
Commercial and residential spaces are two core types of geographical objects in urban areas. However, these two types of spaces are not independent of each other. Spatial associations exist between them, and a thorough understanding of this spatial association is of great significance [...] Read more.
Commercial and residential spaces are two core types of geographical objects in urban areas. However, these two types of spaces are not independent of each other. Spatial associations exist between them, and a thorough understanding of this spatial association is of great significance for improving the efficiency of urban spatial allocation and realizing scientific spatial planning and governance. Thus, in this paper, the spatial association between commercial and residential spaces in Beijing is quantified with GIS spatial analysis of the average nearest neighbor distance, kernel density, spatial correlation, and honeycomb grid analysis. Point-of-interest (POI) big data of the commercial and residential spaces is used in the quantification since this big data represents a comprehensive sampling of these two spaces. The results show that the spatial distributions of commercial and residential spaces are highly correlated, maintaining a relatively close consumption spatial association. However, the degrees of association between different commercial formats and residential spaces vary, presenting the spatial association characteristics of “integration of daily consumption and separation of nondaily consumption”. The commercial formats of catering services, recreation and leisure services, specialty stores, and agricultural markets are strongly associated with the residential spaces. However, the development of frequently used commercial formats of daily consumption such as living services, convenience stores, and supermarkets appears to lag behind the development of residential spaces. In addition, large-scale comprehensive and specialized commercial formats such as shopping malls, home appliances and electronics stores, and home building materials markets are lagging behind the residential spaces over a wide range. This paper is expected to provide development suggestions for the transformation of urban commercial and residential spaces and the construction of “people-oriented” smart cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Accuracy Issues for Spatial Update of Digital Cadastral Maps
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2022, 11(4), 221; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi11040221 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 766
Abstract
All geospatial data are updated periodically. Cadastral parcel mapping, however, has special update requirements that set it apart from other geospatial data. Mapped boundaries change continuously to fit with new survey plans. Additionally, new parcels have to be fitted and aligned with adjoining [...] Read more.
All geospatial data are updated periodically. Cadastral parcel mapping, however, has special update requirements that set it apart from other geospatial data. Mapped boundaries change continuously to fit with new survey plans. Additionally, new parcels have to be fitted and aligned with adjoining parcels to merge them into existing cadastral mapping. This is preferably performed by a spatial adjustment approach to systematically improve its accuracy over time. This paper adapts methods for analysis and adjustment of survey networks to improve the accuracy of cadastral mapping with better coordinate positioning and survey plan dimensions. Case studies for both hypothetical and real cadastral mapping are used to illustrate the issues and spatially resolve errors. Adjustment results achieve an accuracy consistent with other GIS layers and boundary features visible in high-resolution orthoimagery. Graphical charts based on stress–strain relationships provide a simplified means to interpret post-adjustment results to identify and fix potential errors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Modeling Buildings in CityGML LOD1: Building Parts, Terrain Intersection Curve, and Address Features
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2022, 11(3), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi11030166 - 25 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 901
Abstract
3D city models integrate heterogeneous urban data from multiple sources in a unified geospatial representation, combining both semantics and geometry. Although in past decades they have predominantly been used for visualization, today they are used in a large range of tasks related to [...] Read more.
3D city models integrate heterogeneous urban data from multiple sources in a unified geospatial representation, combining both semantics and geometry. Although in past decades they have predominantly been used for visualization, today they are used in a large range of tasks related to exploration, analysis, and management across multiple domains. The complexity of urban processes and the diversity of urban environments bring challenges to the implementation of 3D city models. To address such challenges, this paper presents the development process of a 3D city model of a single neighborhood in the city of Sofia based on the CityGML 2.0 standard. The model represents the buildings in LOD1, focusing on CityGML features, including building parts, the terrain intersection curve, and the address. Similar building models of 18 cities provided as open datasets are explored and compared to extract good modeling practices. As a result, workflows for the generation of 3D building models in LOD1 are elaborated on and improvements in the feature modeling are proposed. Two building model options are examined: (1) the modeling of a building as a single solid with differentiated rooftops and (2) the modeling of a building with separate building parts. The developed 3D building model contains 471 buildings and 198 addresses in both cases of building parts modeling. In addition, the terrain intersection curve (TIC) is modeled and a method for removing the duplicating TIC features is applied. Consequently, the overall count of vertices of the TIC is lowered from 12,112 to 8042. Finally, the possibilities for visualization of the model in popular platforms such as ArcGIS Pro and Cesium Ion are explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Land Use/Land Cover Change and Their Driving Factors in the Yellow River Basin of Shandong Province Based on Google Earth Engine from 2000 to 2020
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2022, 11(3), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi11030163 - 23 Feb 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1214
Abstract
As the convenient outlet to the Bo Sea and the major region of economic development in the Yellow River Basin, Shandong Province in China has undergone large changes in land use/land cover (LULC) in the past two decades with rapid urbanization and population [...] Read more.
As the convenient outlet to the Bo Sea and the major region of economic development in the Yellow River Basin, Shandong Province in China has undergone large changes in land use/land cover (LULC) in the past two decades with rapid urbanization and population growth. The analysis of the LULC change patterns and its driving factors in the Shandong section of the Yellow River Basin can provide a scientific basis for rational planning and ecological protection of land resources in the Shandong section of the Yellow River Basin. In this manuscript, we analyzed the spatial pattern of LULC and its spatial and temporal changes in the Shandong section of the Yellow River Basin in 2000, 2010, and 2020 by using the random forest classification algorithm with the Google Earth Engine platform and multi-temporal Landsat TM/OLI data. The driving factors of LULC changes were also quantified by the factor detector and interaction detector in the geodetector. Results show that in the past two decades, the LULC types in the study area are mainly farmland and construction land, among which the proportion of farmland area has decreased and the proportion of construction land area has increased from 19.4% to 29.7%. Based on the results of factor detector, it can be concluded that elevation, slope, and soil type are the key factors affecting LULC change in the study area. The interaction between elevation and slope, slope and soil type, and temperature and precipitation has strong explanatory power for the spatial variation of LULC change in the study area. The research results can provide data support for ecological environmental protection, sustainable, and high-quality development of the Shandong section of the Yellow River Basin, and help local governments take corresponding measures to achieve coordinated and sustainable socioeconomic and environmental development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Using GIS to Explore the Potential of Business Rating Data to Analyse Stock and Value Change for Land Administration: A Case Study of York
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(5), 321; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9050321 - 12 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1759
Abstract
This study explores the potential of GIS to map and analyse the distribution, stock and value of commercial and industrial property using rating data compiled for the purposes of charging business rates taxation on all non-residential property in the UK. Rating data from [...] Read more.
This study explores the potential of GIS to map and analyse the distribution, stock and value of commercial and industrial property using rating data compiled for the purposes of charging business rates taxation on all non-residential property in the UK. Rating data from 2010, 2017 and 2019, comprising over 6000 property units in the City of York, were filtered and classified by retail, office and industrial use, before geocoding by post code. Nominal rateable values and floor areas for all premises were aggregated in 100 m diameter hexagonal grid and average rateable value calculated to reveal changes in the distribution and value of all employment floorspace in the City over the last decade. Temporospatial analysis revealed polarisation of York’s retail property market between the historic city centre and out-of-town locations. Segmenting traditional retail from food and drink premises revealed growth in the latter has mitigated the hollowing out of the city core. This study is significant in developing a replicable and efficient method of using GIS, using a nationally available rating dataset, to represent changes in the quantum, spatial distribution and relative value of employment floorspace over time to inform local and national land administration, spatial planning and economic development policy making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Visualization of 3D Survey Data for Strata Titles
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(5), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9050310 - 07 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1836
Abstract
Major cities and urban areas are beginning to develop and use 3D properties and public facilities. Consequently, 3D cadastral surveys are increasingly being employed for strata unit ownership registration as a part of land administration services. At present, most national land information systems [...] Read more.
Major cities and urban areas are beginning to develop and use 3D properties and public facilities. Consequently, 3D cadastral surveys are increasingly being employed for strata unit ownership registration as a part of land administration services. At present, most national land information systems do not support 2D and 3D cadastral visualizations. A field survey or validation survey is required to determine the geometry of 3D spatial units for property registration. However, the results of 3D surveys and mapping are not stored in the land information system. This work aims to integrate 2D and 3D geospatial data of property units collected from cadastral surveys with their corresponding legal data. It reviews the workflow for the use of 3D survey data for first-titling of 3D properties in Indonesia. A scenario of use and a prototype were developed based on existing practices and the possibility of extending Indonesia’s Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) to represent 3D units. Data submitted to the prototype as 3D geometries was survey data from 3D cadastral surveys or validation surveys utilizing terrestrial survey methods. The prototype used PostGIS and Cesium Ion to store 3D geometries of data from six 3D surveys. Registrars in local land offices could use the prototype to undertake strata unit registration that establishes a relationship among geospatial features and their survey documents and legal documents. Cesium JS was used as a 3D browser, customized as a web application, to manage and visualize 3D survey data to support strata title registration. The results demonstrate that the first titling of 3D cadaster objects could be conducted and properly visualized in Indonesia by extending the existing LADM with more support for 3D spatial representations and survey documents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
GIScience Theory Based Assessment of Spatial Disparity of Geodetic Control Points Location
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(3), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9030148 - 03 Mar 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1218
Abstract
Geodetic networks provide a spatial reference framework for the positioning of any geographical feature in a common and consistent way. An even spatial distribution of geodetic control points assures good quality for subordinate surveys in mapping, cadaster, engineering activities, and many other land [...] Read more.
Geodetic networks provide a spatial reference framework for the positioning of any geographical feature in a common and consistent way. An even spatial distribution of geodetic control points assures good quality for subordinate surveys in mapping, cadaster, engineering activities, and many other land administration-oriented applications. We investigate the spatial pattern of geodetic control points based on GIScience theory, especially Tobler’s Laws in Geography. The study makes contributions in both the research and application fields. By utilizing Average Nearest Neighbor, multi-distance spatial cluster analysis, and cluster and outlier analysis, it introduces the comprehensive methodology for ex post analysis of geodetic control points’ spatial patterns as well as the quantification of geodetic networks’ uniformity to regularly dense and regularly thinned. Moreover, it serves as a methodological resource and reference for the Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography, not only the maintenance, but also the further densification or modernization the geodetic network in Poland. Furthermore, the results give surveyors the ability to quickly assess the availability of geodetic points, as well as identify environmental obstacles that may hamper measurements. The results show that the base geodetic control points are evenly dispersed (one point over 50 sq. km), however they tend to cluster slightly in urbanized areas and forests (1.3 and 1.4 points per sq. km, respectively). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Reliable 2D Crowdsourced Cadastral Surveys: Case Studies from Greece and Romania
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(2), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9020089 - 01 Feb 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1701
Abstract
This paper is part of a doctoral dissertation (PhD) research that investigates the development of a procedure for reliable 2D crowdsourced cadastral surveying introducing the use of new Information Technology IT tools and increased citizen participation, supported by m-services. For the development of [...] Read more.
This paper is part of a doctoral dissertation (PhD) research that investigates the development of a procedure for reliable 2D crowdsourced cadastral surveying introducing the use of new Information Technology IT tools and increased citizen participation, supported by m-services. For the development of this procedure, the formal cadastral procedure applied currently in two Europeans countries, Greece and Romania, for their modern nation-wide projects is firstly investigated. The first part of this paper briefly investigates the current stage of progress of those projects in both countries, as well as the specifications and procedures applied for the cadastral surveys, and assesses the level of participation of the right holders and the efficiency of the current procedures. Then, a proposal for a crowdsourced general procedure with increased participation of the right holders in the initial cadastral data collection phase is designed that it may be of value either for the planners of those two projects to improve their projects towards a more fit-for-purpose approach and successfully meet the deadlines timely, or for researchers and planners of other projects with similar nation-wide approaches which also require accurate, assured and authoritative end products. For the assessment of the applicability of the proposal, three case studies are held and tested in urban, rural and suburban areas in both countries, using both a commercial application and an open source one. These crowdsourced surveys are compared to the formal cadastral surveys that have been compiled by cadastral professionals in both countries and the achieved results are assessed and judged as satisfactory in terms of geometric accuracies and the avoidance of gross errors in the location of the parcels. A proposal for future research in order to further improve the proposed procedure is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Using Cartographic Documents to Provide Geoinformation on the Rights to Real Estate—Taking Poland as an Example
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(12), 530; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8120530 - 26 Nov 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1100
Abstract
The current and planned EU regulations concerning INSPIRE have forced the Member States to develop national geoportals. The aim of creating geospatial data infrastructure was to unify the exchange of data at a national level, and consequently to create the INSPIRE geoportal by [...] Read more.
The current and planned EU regulations concerning INSPIRE have forced the Member States to develop national geoportals. The aim of creating geospatial data infrastructure was to unify the exchange of data at a national level, and consequently to create the INSPIRE geoportal by the Community Research Centre of the European Commission (JRC), which is to be the center of the European network of geospatial data infrastructure. New opportunities and new solutions to the problems have emerged through the use of thematic layers. The rights to the land each have potential restrictions on its use, and these rights can sometimes prevent the land from being used for its intended purpose. The purpose of the article is to demonstrate the possibility of developing maps showing the utility networks and the right to the land acquired by the utility company. The authors carried out a SWOT analysis of the systemic use of cartographic documents as a way of disclosing the rights to real estate in order to set up utility networks in Poland. The authors examined the impact of this solution on future property owners (investors) to provide them with full knowledge about a given area of real estate. Remote sensing methods may be useful for the disclosure of rights on maps of technical infrastructure, because currently there is no such information in the systems. The developed solution should be used by both local and national geoportals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Impact of a Vicinity of Airport on the Prices of Single-Family Houses with the Use of Geospatial Analysis
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(11), 471; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8110471 - 23 Oct 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1177
Abstract
This article analyses the adverse impact of Chopin Airport in Warsaw on the prices of single-family houses located within the aircraft noise impact zone. The specific feature of the largest airport in Poland is its location within the city limits and the resulting [...] Read more.
This article analyses the adverse impact of Chopin Airport in Warsaw on the prices of single-family houses located within the aircraft noise impact zone. The specific feature of the largest airport in Poland is its location within the city limits and the resulting direct surroundings of both multi- and single-family housing developments. Not only is the nuisance due to the proximity of the airport resulting from the actual exposure to an excessive noise level but also from legal restrictions associated with the Limited Use Area (LUA). The study used statistical modeling by applying a classic multiple regression model, spatial autoregressive model and geographically weighted regression model. Moreover, Geographical Information System (GIS) tools and geostatic modeling were used to visualise the results. The modeling results clearly show the significant impact of the neighborhood nuisance and the related spatial distribution of real estate prices. In addition, the geographically weighted regression model indicates that the proximity to an airport adversely affects the rate of price changes over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
LADM-Based Model for Natural Resource Administration in China
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(10), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8100456 - 14 Oct 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1088
Abstract
China’s rapid urbanization and industrialization have continually placed massive pressure on the country’s natural resources. The fragmented departmental administration of natural resources also intensifies the problem of sustainable use. Accordingly, China’s central government has launched natural resource administration reform from decentralization to unification. [...] Read more.
China’s rapid urbanization and industrialization have continually placed massive pressure on the country’s natural resources. The fragmented departmental administration of natural resources also intensifies the problem of sustainable use. Accordingly, China’s central government has launched natural resource administration reform from decentralization to unification. This study systematically analyzes the reform requirements from legal, organizational, and technical aspects. The right structure of China’s natural resource assets for fulfilling such requirements is examined in this work through a review of relevant legal text, and such a right structure is converted into a draft national technical standard of China’s natural resource administration on the basis of the land administration domain model (LADM). Results show that China’s natural resource administration covers lands, buildings, structures, forests, grasslands, waters, beaches, sea areas, minerals, and other fields. The types of private rights over natural resources include ownerships, land-contracted management rights (cultivated land, forest land, grassland, and water area), rights to use construction land (state-owned and collective-owned), rights to use agricultural land, rights to use homestead land, breeding rights on water areas and beaches, rights to use sea areas, rights to use uninhabited islands, and mining rights. The types of public rights over natural resources include comprehensive land use, urban and rural, sea use, and territory space planning. Furthermore, various types of these property rights can be converted into corresponding classes in LADM on the basis of the analysis of the property subject, object, and rights. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Improving the Positional Accuracy of Traditional Cadastral Index Maps with Membrane Adjustment in Slovenia
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(8), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8080338 - 30 Jul 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1578
Abstract
The main purpose of this research is to evaluate the improvement in positional accuracy (PAI) of cadastral boundary points’ coordinates through the adjustment of a large set of digital cadastral index maps of rural regions based on traditional Franciscan-origin maps of heterogeneous geometric [...] Read more.
The main purpose of this research is to evaluate the improvement in positional accuracy (PAI) of cadastral boundary points’ coordinates through the adjustment of a large set of digital cadastral index maps of rural regions based on traditional Franciscan-origin maps of heterogeneous geometric quality. The distribution of residuals of local coordinates of reference points onto the as yet unconnected neighboring points is researched. In this article, we use the adjustment method based on neighborhood transformation with a mechanical membrane model deriving from Hooke’s Law and consider a general case study of a Slovenian traditional cadastral graphic database of various historical origins. The number of geometric errors in fieldbook information from outdated measurement technologies and inappropriate implementations of cadastral index map geometric maintenance reduces the number of complying datasets of relative geometry by 50%. Previous experiments in traditional cadastral index maps of rural regions, with triangle-based piecewise affine plane transformation (RMSE = 2.4 m), have been improved by the membrane method (RMSE = 1.0 m), based on tests at 623 control points. Positional accuracy improvement of cadastral geospatial data and the integration of geometric subsystems provided recognizable benefits for the future maintenance of a unique, integrated, centralized graphical cadastral subsystem, which is in the testing phase in Slovenia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Prototype of the 3D Cadastral System Based on a NoSQL Database and a JavaScript Visualization Application
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(5), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8050227 - 10 May 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2313
Abstract
3D cadastral systems are more complex than traditional cadastral systems and they require more complex technical solutions and innovative use of developing technologies. Regarding data integrity and data consistency, 3D cadastral data should be maintained by a Database Management System (DBMS). Furthermore, there [...] Read more.
3D cadastral systems are more complex than traditional cadastral systems and they require more complex technical solutions and innovative use of developing technologies. Regarding data integrity and data consistency, 3D cadastral data should be maintained by a Database Management System (DBMS). Furthermore, there are still challenges regarding visualization of 3D cadastral data. A prototype of the 3D cadastral system based on a NoSQL database and a JavaScript application for 3D visualization is designed and tested in order to investigate the possibilities of using new technical solutions. It is assumed that this approach, with further development, could be a good basis for the development of a modern 3D cadastral system. MongoDB database is used for storing data and Cesium JavaScript library is used for 3D visualization. The system uses an LADM (Land Administration Domain Model) based data model. Additionally, script languages, libraries, application programming interfaces (APIs), software and data formats are used for the system development. The case study is based on the real cadastral data. The underground object and building units located below and above the ground level are used to test the proposed data model and the system’s functionality. The proposed system needs further development in order to provide full support to a modern 3D cadastral system. However, it allows maintenance of 3D cadastral data and basic 3D visualization with the interactive approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
LADM Based Utility Network Cadastre in Serbia
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(5), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8050206 - 06 May 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2170
Abstract
The utility network cadastre in Serbia is the main register of utility lines and the rights to them. The Law on State Survey and Cadastre states the necessity for implementing a unified information system of both a real estate and utility network cadastre, [...] Read more.
The utility network cadastre in Serbia is the main register of utility lines and the rights to them. The Law on State Survey and Cadastre states the necessity for implementing a unified information system of both a real estate and utility network cadastre, but this has not been achieved in practice. The reasons for such a unified information system are to ensure easier maintenance of the rights of both the utilities and properties located above or below them, to ensure more efficient procedures for obtaining the consent for placement, repair, or removal of the utility line, to prevent procedures being executed based on outdated data, to build an information system as the law prescribes, and to facilitate the business processes in the Serbian geodetic authority, since it is responsible for both registers. Therefore, an already-developed LADM (Land Administration Domain Model)-based country profile for Serbia should be extended to include information from the utility network cadastre. An analysis of Serbian legislation showed the necessity of extending the class set of the utility network cadastre by further specialization of the LADM LA_LegalSpaceUtilityNetwork class. Furthermore, such a system will support the maintenance of utility network data. In practice, when there is a change made on utility lines by the right holders, it is necessary to implement the change in the register. In many situations, this is not done, and the actual state does not correspond to the one in the register. Usually, modern technologies, such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and LIDAR, are used for data acquisition in order to provide an update of the utility network data. Since these technologies produce 3D data, we analyzed how to link that data to the traditional 2D spatial paradigm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Article
Application of Hierarchical Spatial Autoregressive Models to Develop Land Value Maps in Urbanized Areas
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(4), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8040195 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2140
Abstract
This article aims at testing the possibilities of applying hierarchical spatial autoregressive models to create land value maps in urbanized areas. The use of HSAR (Hierarchical Spatial Autoregressive) models for spatial differentiation of prices in the property market supports the multilevel diagnosis of [...] Read more.
This article aims at testing the possibilities of applying hierarchical spatial autoregressive models to create land value maps in urbanized areas. The use of HSAR (Hierarchical Spatial Autoregressive) models for spatial differentiation of prices in the property market supports the multilevel diagnosis of the structure of this phenomenon, taking into account the effect of spatial interactions. The article applies a two-level hierarchical spatial autoregressive model, which will permit the evaluation of interactions and control spatial heterogeneity at two levels of spatial aggregation (general and detailed). The results of the research include both the evaluation of the impact of location on prices (taking into account non-spatial factors) and the creation of the average land price map, taking into consideration the spatial structure of the city. In empirical studies, the HSAR model was compared with classic LM (Linear Model), HLM (Hierarchical Linear Model), and SAR (Spatial Autoregressive) models to perform comparative analyses of the results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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Project Report
IT Services and Crowdsourcing in Support of the Hellenic Cadastre: Advanced Citizen Participation and Crowdsourcing in the Official Property Registration Process
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(4), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9040190 - 25 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1170
Abstract
Greece is one of the few European countries that has not yet a fully operating Cadastre at national coverage. Cadastral surveying and property registration have been completed only for about 8% of the Greek territory, which includes about 18% of the total property [...] Read more.
Greece is one of the few European countries that has not yet a fully operating Cadastre at national coverage. Cadastral surveying and property registration have been completed only for about 8% of the Greek territory, which includes about 18% of the total property rights. At the remaining areas, cadastral surveying and property registration is still under development and is expected to be completed by the end of 2021. The cadastral survey is a participatory procedure in which property right holders, or their representatives, are expected to declare the land parcels on which they have property rights and submit all documents that prove these rights. The time frame available for the declaration is 3 months, which is specific for each municipality. Right holders are now enabled to provide both spatial and descriptive information, regarding their properties and property rights, without the need of a professional. That includes the parcel’s boundary lines along with the legal documents required to validate the declaration. Each right holder, or a representative, has the option to submit a declaration over the internet through a web application without the need of a professional. Within the frame of a PhD research, several concerns were addressed such as usability, security, and scalability in order for the outcome to support its scope while respecting binding constrains. As a result, two web applications have been created to officially support the Hellenic Cadaster property rights declaration process. The suggested approach was considered a big success in terms of both public acceptance and usability as shown from the statistics collected during the first eight months of its formal operation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of GIScience for Land Administration)
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