Special Issue "Geospatial Metadata"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mohsen Kalantari
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Guest Editor
Department of Infrastructure Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia
Interests: spatial metadata; 3D geospatial information; building information modeling; Internet of Things; land administration
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Prof. Abbas Rajabifard
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Guest Editor
Director, Centre for SDIs and Land Administration, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3010, VIC, Australia
Interests: SDI; land administration; BIM; 3D visualisation; digital engineering; UN SDGs; spatial urban data analytics
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Prof. Jacynthe Pouliot
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Guest Editor
Vice Dean Research, Faculty of Forestry, Geography and Geomatics, Université Laval, Québec, G1V 0A6, Canada
Interests: 3D modeling; application in 3D cadastre; integration of geospatial data; geospatial information system; 3D visualisation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Spatial metadata are a critical part of spatial data infrastructure by which custodians and users of spatial data organise and access the data. Records of spatial metadata are created by custodians, following national and international standards. While spatial metadata have served the needs of custodians well in terms of data organisation, it is always argued that users do not find the records useful due to several reasons, such the content, organisation of records, user-friendliness, and fitness for purpose. There is a knowledge gap in how spatial metadata systems should evolve so that users have a better experience with the records. This Special Issue invites researchers and practitioners to submit original work on user-focused spatial metadata systems. We accept a wide range of contributions, such as metadata data issues relevant to user requirement analysis, user metadata interaction, metadata standards, data and metadata modeling, data catalogues, metadata for 3D and 4D spatial data, spatial metadata 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0. We welcome submissions from diverse disciplines, including urban planning, public safety, geographic information science, Human–Computer Interaction, Internet of Things, Big Data, and others.

Dr. Mohsen Kalantari
Prof. Abbas Rajabifard
Prof. Jacynthe Pouliot
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Spatial metadata
  • Human–computer interaction
  • Data Quality assessment
  • Data Quality report
  • Standardisation
  • Data catalogue
  • SDI
  • GIS
  • Fit-for-purpose
  • Usability

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exploiting the Potential of VGI Metadata to Develop A Data-Driven Framework for Predicting User’s Proficiency in OpenStreetMap Context
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(11), 492; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8110492 - 31 Oct 2019
Abstract
Volunteered geographic information (VGI) encourages citizens to contribute geographic data voluntarily that helps to enhance geospatial databases. VGI’s significant limitations are trustworthiness and reliability concerning data quality due to the anonymity of data contributors. We propose a data-driven model to address these issues [...] Read more.
Volunteered geographic information (VGI) encourages citizens to contribute geographic data voluntarily that helps to enhance geospatial databases. VGI’s significant limitations are trustworthiness and reliability concerning data quality due to the anonymity of data contributors. We propose a data-driven model to address these issues on OpenStreetMap (OSM), a particular case of VGI in recent times. This research examines the hypothesis of evaluating the proficiency of the contributor to assess the credibility of the data contributed. The proposed framework consists of two phases, namely, an exploratory data analysis phase and a learning phase. The former explores OSM data history to perform feature selection, resulting in “OSM Metadata” summarized using principal component analysis. The latter combines unsupervised and supervised learning through K-means for user-clustering and multi-class logistic regression for user classification. We identified five major classes representing user-proficiency levels based on contribution behavior in this study. We tested the framework with India OSM data history, where 17% of users are key contributors, and 27% are unexperienced local users. The results for classifying new users are satisfactory with 95.5% accuracy. Our conclusions recognize the potential of OSM metadata to illustrate the user’s contribution behavior without the knowledge of the user’s profile information. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geospatial Metadata)
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Open AccessArticle
Semantic Profiles for Easing SensorML Description: Review and Proposal
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(8), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8080340 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
The adoption of Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) practices by sensor maintainers is hampered by the inherent complexity of the Sensor Model Language (SensorML), its high expressiveness, and the scarce availability of editing tools. To overcome these issues, the Earth Observation (EO) community often [...] Read more.
The adoption of Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) practices by sensor maintainers is hampered by the inherent complexity of the Sensor Model Language (SensorML), its high expressiveness, and the scarce availability of editing tools. To overcome these issues, the Earth Observation (EO) community often recurs to SensorML profiles narrowing the range of admitted metadata structures and value ranges. Unfortunately, profiles frequently fall short of providing usable editing tools and comprehensive validation criteria, particularly for the difficulty of checking value ranges in the multi-tenanted domain of the Web of Data. In this paper, we provide an updated review of current practices, techniques, and tools for editing SensorML in the perspective of profile support and introduce our solution for effective profile definition. Beside allowing for formalization of a broad range of constraints that concur in defining a metadata profile, our proposal closes the gap between profile definition and actual editing of the corresponding metadata by allowing for ex-ante validation of the metadata that is produced. On this basis, we suggest the notion of Semantic Web SensorML profiles, characterized by a new family of constraints involving Semantic Web sources. We also discuss implementation of SensorML profiles with our tool and pinpoint the benefits with respect to the existing ex-post validation facilities provided by schema definition languages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geospatial Metadata)
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Open AccessArticle
Remote Diagnosis of Architectural Heritage Based on 5W1H Model-Based Metadata in Virtual Reality
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(8), 339; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8080339 - 30 Jul 2019
Abstract
We propose a framework based on the 5W1H model-based metadata for remote diagnosis in virtual reality (VR). For this purpose, we suggest unique metadata composed of Point of Interest (POI)-extended anchor (xAnchor)-content for a context-aware service in virtual and augmented reality. We define [...] Read more.
We propose a framework based on the 5W1H model-based metadata for remote diagnosis in virtual reality (VR). For this purpose, we suggest unique metadata composed of Point of Interest (POI)-extended anchor (xAnchor)-content for a context-aware service in virtual and augmented reality. We define the attributes of the metadata based on the 5W1H context for information retrieval according to the context in a remote diagnosis. Second, we propose the ontology-based linker metadata that express the relations between AR scenes and that retrieve external information. Moreover, we suggest heritage building information metadata for information retrieval according to context. For evaluation, we created a geo-tagged content tool and a remote diagnosis VR application. We conducted focus-group interviews and heuristic evaluations for remote diagnosis in VR to verify the methodology of this study. As a result, we found that experts were most satisfied with the functions that provide the contextualized information. This study contributes to the geospatial metadata for a context-aware service in VR/AR as well as the remote diagnosis framework to overcome the time-consuming problem of the existing remote diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geospatial Metadata)
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Open AccessArticle
Geographic Information Metadata—An Outlook from the International Standardization Perspective
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(6), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8060280 - 15 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Geographic information metadata provides a detailed description of geographic information resources. Well before digital data emerged, metadata were shown in the margins of paper maps to inform the reader of the name of the map, the scale, the orientation of the magnetic North, [...] Read more.
Geographic information metadata provides a detailed description of geographic information resources. Well before digital data emerged, metadata were shown in the margins of paper maps to inform the reader of the name of the map, the scale, the orientation of the magnetic North, the projection used, the coordinate systems, the legend, and so on. Metadata were used to communicate practical information for the proper use of maps. When geographic information entered the digital era with geographic information systems, metadata was also collected digitally to describe datasets and the dataset collections for various purposes. Initially, metadata were collected and saved in digital files by data producers for their own specific needs. The sharing of geographic datasets that required producers to provide metadata with the dataset to guide proper use of the dataset—map scale, data sources, extent, datum, coordinate reference system, etc. Because of issues with sharing and no common understanding of metadata requirements, the need for metadata standardization was recognized by the geographic information community worldwide. The ISO technical committee 211 was created in 1994 with the scope of standardization in the field of digital geographic information to support interoperability. In the early years of the committee, standardization of metadata was initiated for different purposes, which culminated in the ISO 19115:2003 standard. Now, there are many ISO Geographic information standards that covers the various aspect of geographic information metadata. This paper traces an illustration of the development and evolution of the requirements and international standardization activities of geographic information metadata standards, profiles and resources, and how these attest to facilitating the discovery, evaluation, and appropriate use of geographic information in various contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geospatial Metadata)
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