Special Issue "New Organizational Values and Mental Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gabriela Topa
Website
Guest Editor
Social and Organizational Psychology Department, The National Distance Education University, 28015 Madrid, Spain
Interests: occupational health; retirement; late career; psychological contract; organizational justice; healthy aging; aging at work; migrant workers; gender gap in retirement
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Cristina García-Ael
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, National Distance Education University (UNED), 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: gender and leadership; return to work; gender stereotypes; group discrimination

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Values are the fundamental beliefs of a person or organization, and these guiding principles orientate behavior and allow people interpret what is right and wrong. Values also help organizations to determine if they are on the correct pathway and to fulfill their goals by creating a solid guide. As the organizational paradigm is constantly evolving, new values emerge, highlighting the relevance of integrity, accountability, commitment to customers, trust, and social responsibility. The focus of this Special Issue is devoted to understanding the ways of bringing new organizational values to life, how organizations communicate and promote values change, how they demonstrate their core values to the whole society, and the paths by which these new sets of organizational values could affect workers’ and citizens’ mental health. Evidence is also needed on possible conflicting workplace values, and their relationship with personal wellbeing at work and in non-work environments.

Moreover, as masculinity and/or femininity are considered as key motivators for specific beliefs and behaviors, papers dealing with gender issues on organizational values implementation and mental health are also welcome.

New research papers, reviews, case reports, and conference papers are welcome to this Issue. Other manuscript types accepted include empirical research, methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries.

We will accept manuscripts from different disciplines, including psychology, organizational theory, sociology, epidemiology, occupational health and safety studies, and social sciences.

Prof. Dr. Gabriela Topa
Dr. Cristina García-Ael
Prof. Dr. Gabriele Giorgi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Organizations
  • Values
  • Gender
  • Mental health
  • Personal well-being
  • Organizational socialization
  • Professional values
  • Gender issues
  • Corporate social responsibility
  • Organizational change
  • Values learning and acquisition
  • Work psychology
  • Organizational psychology
  • The psychological and social environment
  • Smart learning and working environments
  • Occupational health promotion
  • Prevention of risk factors at work
  • Employees wellbeing
  • Positive attitudes at work
  • Prosocial behavior in groups and organizations
  • Healthy organizations
  • Decent and flexible work
  • Quality of working life
  • Psychological and social capital
  • New management styles
  • Psychological and physical workability
  • Work-health balance
  • Work–life interface
  • Employability promotion
  • Innovative and intrapreneurial skills

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Corporate Social Responsibility at the Micro-Level as a “New Organizational Value” for Sustainability: Are Females More Aligned towards It?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2165; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042165 - 23 Feb 2021
Viewed by 213
Abstract
While prior studies have largely addressed corporate social responsibility (CSR) at a macro or institutional level, its importance at the micro or individual level is to date underexplored, especially in the context of developing economies. Further, it is not clear from the studies [...] Read more.
While prior studies have largely addressed corporate social responsibility (CSR) at a macro or institutional level, its importance at the micro or individual level is to date underexplored, especially in the context of developing economies. Further, it is not clear from the studies in the extant literature how the role of females is more important in the context of environmental management as compared to males. Similarly, micro-level CSR (MCSR) is emerging as a “new organizational value”, and the organizations that acknowledge this “new organizational value” and incorporate it into their business operations are likely to achieve sustainability objectives far better as compared to their counterparts. The present study investigates the impact of MCSR on employees’ pro-environmental behavior with the moderating effect of gender in the healthcare sector of Pakistan. The data were collected from five large hospitals in the city of Lahore through a self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) in AMOS software. A total of 533 out of 800 responses were received, which were used for data analysis of the present study. The results revealed that MCSR positively influences employee’s pro-environmental behavior, and gender moderates this relationship but the moderating effect of females is stronger as compared to males. The findings of the present study would help policymakers understand the importance of MCSR as a “new organizational value” to influence employees’ pro-environmental behavior with a special focus to promote the proactive role of females at workplaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Organizational Values and Mental Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Could Emotional Intelligence Ability Predict Salary? A Cross-Sectional Study in a Multioccupational Sample
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1322; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031322 - 01 Feb 2021
Viewed by 564
Abstract
The study of emotional intelligence (EI) in work environments is a trending topic. However, few studies have examined the relationship between EI and salary. Therefore, the presented research aims to analyze the influence of EI on salary using a multioccupational sample. The participants [...] Read more.
The study of emotional intelligence (EI) in work environments is a trending topic. However, few studies have examined the relationship between EI and salary. Therefore, the presented research aims to analyze the influence of EI on salary using a multioccupational sample. The participants were 785 subjects aged between 18 and 58 years (M = 39.41; SD = 10.95). EI ability was measured using the Mobile Emotional Intelligence Test (MEIT), while the salary was collected together with other sociodemographic variables in a questionnaire created ad hoc. After controlling for the age, gender, social class, educational level, and work experience variables, the results of correlation and regression analysis showed that participants with higher EI and emotional-repair capacity generally have higher salary. These findings provide preliminary evidence that EI is a relevant variable in achieving career success. The ability to channel and manage emotions could help employees develop stronger interpersonal relationships, leading to higher positions and greater financial compensation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Organizational Values and Mental Health)
Open AccessArticle
Inculcation of Green Behavior in Employees: A Multilevel Moderated Mediation Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 331; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010331 - 05 Jan 2021
Viewed by 638
Abstract
In this era of globalization, preventing organizations from undermining and degrading the environment has become a great challenge, especially when considering that organizations are among the major contributors to environmental deterioration. As a result, scholars have recently begun to focus on understanding the [...] Read more.
In this era of globalization, preventing organizations from undermining and degrading the environment has become a great challenge, especially when considering that organizations are among the major contributors to environmental deterioration. As a result, scholars have recently begun to focus on understanding the key determinants of employee green behavior (EGB), a nascent field within the area of sustainable development and organizational behavior. This study extends the emerging discussion over EGB by investigating how green behavior can be inculcated into employees’ mindsets and under what conditions this can best be accomplished. The present research examines the relationship between ethical leadership and EGB by the mediating mechanisms of green psychological climate, employees’ harmonious environmental passion, and employees’ environmental commitment, through the underpinnings of social learning theory. Further, the study examines the contingency effects of leaders’ pro-environmental attitudes to determine how leaders with ethical attributes and pro-environmental attitudes can create a green psychological climate that ultimately leads to EGB through employees’ harmonious environmental passion and employees’ environmental commitment. The approach to implementing theory development is deductive as the research employed a quantitative research design and survey administration with a time-lagged approach. Multi-level data were collected from 400 respondents working in public and private sector hospitals and universities in Pakistan. The analysis was conducted in MPlus. The results show positive and statistically significant effects of ethical leadership on EGB through the serial mediations of a green psychological climate and employees’ harmonious environmental passion, and a green psychological climate and employees’ environmental commitment. Moreover, the leaders’ pro-environmental attitude contingency strengthens the indirect impact of ethical leadership on EGB. This research provides several managerial implications through which organizations can strategically concentrate on EGB, including saving energy by turning off unused lights, reducing waste, and recycling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Organizational Values and Mental Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop