Special Issue "Active Commuting and Active Transportation"

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Adilson Marques
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Lisbon, Cruz Quebrada 1499-002 Portugal
Interests: physical activity; fitness; obesity; health promotion; public health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Among children, adolescents ,and adults, the prevalence of physical inactivity is high. Studies that present trends of physical activity over the last few decades have shown that physical activity levels are not increasing. This is concerning because low levels of physical activity jeopardize the population’s health status.

In order to increase the levels of physical activity and consequently improve health status, population-wide strategies are needed to change behavior. A seemingly easy way to increase the population’s levels of physical activity is through active transportation. Active commuting and active transportation on foot or by bicycle create opportunities for physical activity, provide transportation options for those without a car, encourage social cohesion, and reduce contributions to air pollution. Therefore, it is important to know the prevalence of the use of active transportation, as well as strategies for its promotion.

Sharing good practice is equally important so that the scientific community can identify the best ways to promote physical activity through active transportation.

Dr. Adilson Marques
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Walking
  • Green exercise
  • Bicycling
  • Leisure time

Published Papers (14 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Gender Influence on Students, Parents, and Teachers’ Perceptions of What Children and Adolescents in Germany Need to Cycle to School: A Concept Mapping Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6872; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186872 - 20 Sep 2020
Abstract
Active commuting to school is highly recommended for several reasons, and in the decision-making process for doing so, a child interacts with parents and teachers. Until now, these three interactors’ gender-specific perspectives on children and adolescents’ need for cycling to school have been [...] Read more.
Active commuting to school is highly recommended for several reasons, and in the decision-making process for doing so, a child interacts with parents and teachers. Until now, these three interactors’ gender-specific perspectives on children and adolescents’ need for cycling to school have been unavailable. Thus, our concept mapping study analyzed the needs of 12- to 15-year-olds in Germany for cycling to and from school daily, as perceived by students, parents, and teachers stratified by gender. From November 2019 to February 2020, 136 students, 58 parents, and 29 teachers participated. Although 87.8% of girls and 100% of boys owned a bicycle, only 44.4% of girls and 72.9% of boys cycled to school. On average, girls cycled to school on 1.6 ± 2.0 days a week and boys on 2.7 ± 2.0 days a week. A “bicycle and related equipment,” the “way to school,” and “personal factors” were reported needs, perceived by students and teachers of both genders and by mothers. Girls reported the additional gender-specific need for “social behavior in road traffic,” mothers and female teachers reported “role of parents,” and female teachers reported a “sense of safety.” This study’s findings could inspire the development of school-based bicycle interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure A1

Open AccessArticle
Association between Perceived Neighborhood Built Environment and Walking and Cycling for Transport among Inhabitants from Latin America: The ELANS Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6858; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186858 - 19 Sep 2020
Abstract
Purpose: This study aimed to examine the associations of the perceived neighborhood built environment with walking and cycling for transport in inhabitants from Latin American countries. Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 9218 participants (15–65 years) from the Latin American Study of Nutrition and [...] Read more.
Purpose: This study aimed to examine the associations of the perceived neighborhood built environment with walking and cycling for transport in inhabitants from Latin American countries. Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 9218 participants (15–65 years) from the Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health, which included a nationally representative sample of eight countries. All participants completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Long Form for measure walking and cycling for transport and the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale-Abbreviated. Furthermore, perceived proximity from home to public open spaces and shopping centers was assessed. Results: Perceived land use mix-access (OR: 1.32; 95%CI: 1.16,1.50) and the existence of many alternative routes in the neighbourhood (1.09 1.01,1.17) were associated with higher odds of reporting any walking for transport (≥10 min/week). Perceived slow speed of traffic (1.88 1.82,1.93) and few drivers exceeding the speed limits (1.92; 1.86,1.98) were also related to higher odds of reporting any walking for transport. The odds of reporting any cycling for transport (≥10 min/week) were higher in participants perceiving more walking/cycling facilities (1.87 1.76,1.99), and better aesthetics (1.22 1.09,1.38). Conclusions: Dissimilar perceived neighborhood built environment characteristics were associated with walking and cycling for transport among inhabitants from Latin America. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Open AccessArticle
Profiles of Active Transportation among Children and Adolescents in the Global Matrix 3.0 Initiative: A 49-Country Comparison
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5997; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165997 - 18 Aug 2020
Abstract
This article aims to compare the prevalence of active transportation among children and adolescents from 49 countries at different levels of development. The data was extracted from the Report Cards on Physical Activity for Children and Youth from the 49 countries that participated [...] Read more.
This article aims to compare the prevalence of active transportation among children and adolescents from 49 countries at different levels of development. The data was extracted from the Report Cards on Physical Activity for Children and Youth from the 49 countries that participated in the Global Matrix 3.0 initiative. Descriptive statistics and a latent profile analysis with active transportation, Human Development Index and Gini index as latent variables were conducted. The global average grade was a “C”, indicating that countries are succeeding with about half of children and youth (47–53%). There is wide variability in the prevalence and in the definition of active transportation globally. Three different profiles of countries were identified based on active transportation grades, Human Development Index (HDI) and income inequalities. The first profile grouped very high HDI countries with low prevalence of active transport and low inequalities. The second profile grouped low and middle HDI countries with high prevalence of active transportation and higher inequalities. And the third profile was characterized by the relatively high prevalence of active transportation and more variability in the socioeconomic variables. Promising policies from countries under each profile were identified. A unified definition of active transportation and contextualized methods for its assessment are needed to advance in surveillance and practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Everyday Pedelec Use and Its Effect on Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4807; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134807 - 03 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Pedelecs (e-bikes with electrical support up to 25 km·h−1) are important in active transportation. Yet, little is known about physiological responses during their everyday use. We compared daily pedelec (P) and bicycle (B) use to determine if pedelecs are a suitable [...] Read more.
Pedelecs (e-bikes with electrical support up to 25 km·h−1) are important in active transportation. Yet, little is known about physiological responses during their everyday use. We compared daily pedelec (P) and bicycle (B) use to determine if pedelecs are a suitable tool to enhance physical activity. In 101 employees, cycling duration and intensity, heart rate (HR) during P and B were recorded via a smartphone app. Each recording period was a randomized crossover design and lasted two weeks. The ride quantity was higher in P compared to B (5.3 ± 4.3 vs. 3.2 ± 4.0 rides·wk−1; p < 0.001) resulting in a higher total cycling time per week for P (174 ± 146 min·wk−1) compared to B (99 ± 109 min·wk−1; p < 0.001). The mean HR during P was lower than B (109 ± 14 vs. 118 ± 17 bpm; p < 0.001). The perceived exertion was lower in P (11.7 ± 1.8 vs. 12.8 ± 2.1 in B; p < 0.001). The weekly energy expenditure was higher during P than B (717 ± 652 vs. 486 ± 557 metabolic equivalents of the task [MET]·min·wk−1; p < 0.01). Due to a sufficient HR increase in P, pedelecs offer a more active form of transportation to enhance physical activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
How Does Commute Time Affect Labor Supply in Urban China? Implications for Active Commuting
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4631; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134631 - 27 Jun 2020
Abstract
This paper identifies the causal effect of commute time on labor supply in urban China and provides implications for the development of active commuting. Labor supply is measured by daily workhours, workdays per week and weekly workhours, and city average commute time is [...] Read more.
This paper identifies the causal effect of commute time on labor supply in urban China and provides implications for the development of active commuting. Labor supply is measured by daily workhours, workdays per week and weekly workhours, and city average commute time is adopted as an instrumental variable to correct the endogenous problem of individual commute time. We find that in urban China, commute time does not have effect on daily labor supply but has negative effects on workdays per week and weekly labor supply. These results are different from those found in Germany and Spain, and are potentially related to the intense competition among workers in the labor market of China. Moreover, the effect of commute time on workdays per week is stronger for job changed workers. In addition, the effects of commute time on labor supply are not different between males and females. Finally, policy implications for active commuting are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Open AccessArticle
Active School Transport among Children from Canada, Colombia, Finland, South Africa, and the United States: A Tale of Two Journeys
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3847; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113847 - 28 May 2020
Abstract
Walking and biking to school represent a source of regular daily physical activity (PA). The objectives of this paper are to determine the associations of distance to school, crime safety, and socioeconomic variables with active school transport (AST) among children from five culturally [...] Read more.
Walking and biking to school represent a source of regular daily physical activity (PA). The objectives of this paper are to determine the associations of distance to school, crime safety, and socioeconomic variables with active school transport (AST) among children from five culturally and socioeconomically different country sites and to describe the main policies related to AST in those country sites. The analytical sample included 2845 children aged 9–11 years from the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment. Multilevel generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate the associations between distance, safety and socioeconomic variables, and the odds of engaging in AST. Greater distance to school and vehicle ownership were associated with a lower likelihood of engaging in AST in sites in upper-middle- and high-income countries. Crime perception was negatively associated to AST only in sites in high-income countries. Our results suggest that distance to school is a consistent correlate of AST in different contexts. Our findings regarding crime perception support a need vs. choice framework, indicating that AST may be the only commuting choice for many children from the study sites in upper-middle-income countries, despite the high perception of crime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Combined Modal and Route Choice Behavioral Complementarity Equilibrium Model with Users of Vehicles and Electric Bicycles
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3704; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103704 - 24 May 2020
Abstract
The popularity of electric bicycles in China makes them a common transportation mode for people to commute and move around. However, with the increase in traffic volumes for both vehicles and electric bicycles, urban traffic safety and congestion problems are rising due to [...] Read more.
The popularity of electric bicycles in China makes them a common transportation mode for people to commute and move around. However, with the increase in traffic volumes for both vehicles and electric bicycles, urban traffic safety and congestion problems are rising due to traffic conflicts between these two modes. To regulate travel behavior, it is essential to analyze the mode choice and route choice behaviors of travelers. This study proposes a combined modal split and multiclass traffic user equilibrium model formulated as a complementarity problem (CP) to simultaneously characterize the mode choice behavior and route choice behavior of both vehicle and electric bicycle users. This model captures the impacts of route travel time and out-of-pocket cost on travelers’ route choice behaviors. Further, modified Bureau of Public Roads (BPR) functions are developed to model the travel times of links with and without physical separation between vehicle lanes and bicycle lanes. This study also analyzes the conditions for uniqueness of the equilibrium solution. A Newton method is developed to solve the proposed model. Numerical examples with different scales are used to validate the proposed model. The results show that electric bicycles are more favored by travelers during times of high network congestion. In addition, total system travel time can be reduced significantly through physical separation of vehicle lanes from electric bicycle lanes to minimize their mutual interference. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Prevalence of Physical Activity among Adolescents from 105 Low, Middle, and High-Income Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3145; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093145 - 30 Apr 2020
Abstract
Introduction: Physical activity (PA) is a beneficial health behaviour, however most adolescents worldwide are physically inactive. Updated information on the prevalence and trends of PA is important to inform national and international authorities and support countries’ public health policies and actions. This study [...] Read more.
Introduction: Physical activity (PA) is a beneficial health behaviour, however most adolescents worldwide are physically inactive. Updated information on the prevalence and trends of PA is important to inform national and international authorities and support countries’ public health policies and actions. This study aimed to present the worldwide, regional, and national prevalence of PA participation according to its frequency in adolescents. Methods: This study is based on cross-sectional surveys of adolescents’ populations from several countries and all regions worldwide. The sample comprised 520,533 adolescents (251,788 boys; 268,745 girls), from 105 countries and regions. Results: Most adolescents engaged in PA up to 3 days/week (57.1%; 95% CI: 56.9; 57.2). The prevalence of engaging in PA every day decreases over the age from 28.2% at age of 11–12 years (95% CI: 27.4; 29.0) to 21.2% at age of 16–17 years (95% CI: 20.3; 22.0) among boys; and from 19.4% (95% CI: 18.5; 20.2) to 11.1% (95% CI: 10.1; 12.0) among girls. For boys and girls who engaged in PA 5-6 days/week, the prevalence increases from countries with the lowest human development index to countries with the highest. Cambodia (7.3%, 95% CI: 3.8; 10.8), Philippines (7.7%, 95% CI: 5.6; 9.7), Sudan (8.8%, 95% CI: 4.7; 12.9), Timor-Leste (8.9%, 95% CI: 5.5; 12.3), and Afghanistan (10.1%, 95% CI: 6.1; 14.1) were the countries with the lowest prevalence of sufficient PA. Conclusions: National, regional, and worldwide data on the prevalence of physical activity in adolescents highlights the importance of improving the global levels of PA, especially in girls. Identifying the factors causing the age-related decrease in physical activity levels will permit public health entities to define priority actions and policies against physical inactivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Open AccessArticle
Neighborhood Walkability and Active Transportation: A Correlation Study in Leisure and Shopping Purposes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2178; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072178 - 25 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
A walkable environment is a crucial factor for promoting active transportation. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between neighborhood walkability and active transportation for noncommuting purposes (leisure and shopping) in Seoul, Korea. The Walkability Score is used as a [...] Read more.
A walkable environment is a crucial factor for promoting active transportation. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between neighborhood walkability and active transportation for noncommuting purposes (leisure and shopping) in Seoul, Korea. The Walkability Score is used as a measure of walkability, and a multilevel logistic regression model is employed to measure the odds of active transportation (i.e., walking and cycling; nonmotorized trips) at two levels: individual (level 1) and neighborhood (level 2). The results of the study showed that the Walkability Score was significantly correlated with higher odds of active transportation in shopping models. Specifically, every one-point increase in the Walkability Score was associated with 1.5%–1.8% higher odds of active transportation in shopping models. However, there was no significant correlation between the two in leisure models. Meanwhile, individual characteristics associated with the odds of active transportation differed in the leisure and shopping models. Older age was positively correlated with the odds of active transportation in the leisure model, while females showed a positive correlation in the shopping model. Based on the study, urban and transportation planners can recommend urban policies to promote active transportation in an urban setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Active Commuting to School and Physical Activity Levels among 11 to 16 Year-Old Adolescents from 63 Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1276; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041276 - 17 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Background: Global physical activity levels are low. Active commuting to school is a low-cost and sustainable behaviour that promotes adolescents’ physical activity levels. Despite its importance, data on low- and middle-income countries is scarce. This study aimed to assess the relationship between active [...] Read more.
Background: Global physical activity levels are low. Active commuting to school is a low-cost and sustainable behaviour that promotes adolescents’ physical activity levels. Despite its importance, data on low- and middle-income countries is scarce. This study aimed to assess the relationship between active commuting to school and physical activity (PA) levels among 11–16 years-old adolescents from 63 low- and middle-income countries and six world regions. Methods: Data were from the GSHS database. Participants were 187,934 adolescents (89,550 boys), aged 11–16 years-old, from 63 low- and middle-income countries. Active commuting to school and PA were self-reported as the number of days adolescents walked or cycled to school and engaged in physical activity for at least 60 min in the past 7 days. Results: Boys and girls who actively commuted to school presented higher prevalence of attaining the PA recommendations, but only for the 13–14 (boys: 16.6% versus 22.0%; girls: 9.8% versus 14.6%) and 15–16 (boys: 16.3% versus 21.6%; girls: 8.0% versus 14.0%) year-old age groups. Only for Oceania, Central Asian, Middle Eastern, and North African girls and Sub-Saharan African boys no difference was found in the prevalence of attaining the PA recommendations between those who actively commuted to school and those who did not. Boys who actively commuted to school were 42% (95% CI: 1.37, 1.46) more likely to achieve the PA recommendations, while girls were 66% (95% CI: 1.59, 1.73) more likely to achieve the PA recommendations. Conclusions: Active commuting to school is associated with the adolescents’ physical activity levels. However, it may have a lesser influence in helping younger adolescents attaining physical activity recommendations. Public health authorities should promote active commuting to school among adolescents in order to improve the PA levels and promote health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Open AccessArticle
Does Environmental Walkability Matter? The Role of Walkable Environment in Active Commuting
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1261; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041261 - 15 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Since walkability plays an important role in active commuting, several cities are actively promoting its integration into urban and environmental planning policies. This study examined the association between walkability and active commuting in Seoul, Korea. A multilevel logistic regression model was used to [...] Read more.
Since walkability plays an important role in active commuting, several cities are actively promoting its integration into urban and environmental planning policies. This study examined the association between walkability and active commuting in Seoul, Korea. A multilevel logistic regression model was used to examine the correlation between Walkability Score and the probability of active commuting after controlling for individual variables. The analysis used 129,044 individual samples nested within 424 administrative districts (dongs). In this study, three models were tested: Model 1 contained only individual variables, Model 2 contained individual variables and Walkability Score, and Model 3 included neighborhood-level variables in addition to the variables of Model 2. The results showed that the Walkability Score was significantly correlated with the odds of active commuting. Specifically, every additional one-point increase in Walkability Score was associated with 0.3% higher odds of active commuting (Model 2: odds ratio (OR) = 1.003, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.001–1.005; Model 3: OR = 1.003, 95% CI = 1.001–1.006). Additionally, public transportation density was also positively correlated with the odds of active commuting. The odds of active commuting were positively correlated with younger age, female, lower-income, and having no car. Based on the findings, policy recommendations in urban planning and design, transport engineering, and environmental planning are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Active Commuting and Depression Symptoms in Adults: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 1041; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17031041 - 06 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Physical activity (PA) is suggested to have a protective effect against depression. One way of engaging in PA is through active commuting. This review summarises the literature regarding the relationship between active commuting and depression among adults and older adults. A systematic review [...] Read more.
Physical activity (PA) is suggested to have a protective effect against depression. One way of engaging in PA is through active commuting. This review summarises the literature regarding the relationship between active commuting and depression among adults and older adults. A systematic review of studies published up to December 2019, performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines, was conducted using three databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science). A total of seven articles were identified as relevant. The results from these studies were inconsistent. Only two presented a significant relationship between active commuting and depression symptoms. In those two studies, switching to more active modes of travel and walking long distances were negatively related to the likelihood of developing new depressive symptoms. In the other five studies, no significant association between active travel or active commuting and depression was found. The relationship between active commuting and depression symptoms in adults is not clear. More studies on this topic are necessary in order to understand if active commuting can be used as a public health strategy to tackle mental health issues such as depression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Active Commuting and Physical Fitness: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2721; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082721 - 15 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Physical fitness (PF) is considered an excellent biomarker of health. One possible strategy to improve PF levels is active commuting. This review, performed accordingly to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews guidelines includes scientific articles published in peer-reviewed journals up to December [...] Read more.
Physical fitness (PF) is considered an excellent biomarker of health. One possible strategy to improve PF levels is active commuting. This review, performed accordingly to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews guidelines includes scientific articles published in peer-reviewed journals up to December 2019 that aim at examining the relationship between active travel/commuting and PF. The search was performed in three databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science). Sixteen studies were included in this review. Findings from the 16 studies were unclear. From the eleven studies on children and adolescents screened, eight were cross-sectional, one prospective cohort, one quasi-experimental, and one experimental. From the five studies on adults, four were experimental and one cross-sectional. Body mass, waist circumference, skinfolds, fat mass, cardiorespiratory fitness, upper and lower strength tests were performed in children, adolescents, and adults. Agility and speed tests were performed only in the young age groups. Majority of the investigations on young ages and adults have shown positive effects or relationships between active commuting and several attributes of PF. However, to avoid misconceptions, there is a need for future robust investigation to identify potential mediators or confounders in this relationship. More robust investigations are essential to understand how and whether decision-makers and public health authorities can use active travel/commuting as a strategy to improve PF in all ages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
A Scoping Review of Children and Adolescents’ Active Travel in Ireland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 2016; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062016 - 18 Mar 2020
Abstract
There appears to be a lack of existing data that comprehensively summarizes the evidence of children and adolescents’ active travel in the Republic of Ireland. In lieu of this, a scoping review was conducted to map the existing literature (2000–2020) on children and [...] Read more.
There appears to be a lack of existing data that comprehensively summarizes the evidence of children and adolescents’ active travel in the Republic of Ireland. In lieu of this, a scoping review was conducted to map the existing literature (2000–2020) on children and adolescents’ active travel in the Republic of Ireland. A scoping review design extracted a total of 19 publications, which show a consistent focus on the identified population’s active travel patterns, mainly to and from school, mostly self-report and cross-sectional research study designs; however, there are few longitudinal data, intervention and participatory studies. Key issues from these identified scoping review studies are discussed with the potential to better inform policy makers, practitioners and researchers to delineate programmes and strategies for promoting active travel among children and adolescents in the Republic of Ireland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop