Special Issue "Non-bovine Milk: Novel Sources and Recent Advances in Their Nutrition, Safety, Functionality and Acceptability"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alaa El-Din A Bekhit
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
Interests: muscle biochemistry; meat quality; bioactive compounds from food by-products; enzymatic hydrolysis; new product development; ethnic food; halal food
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current non-bovine milk production trends suggest that a wide range of animal- and plant-derived milk and milk-like products will become available to consumers in the future. It is important for consumers and industry to gain more insights into the macro- and micronutrient composition of these non-bovine milks and their contribution to nutrition and health. Due to rapid changes in consumer milk consumption trends and the emergence of novel non-bovine milk industries (with production based on small ruminants and plants), information on unique aspects of these products in terms of bioavailability of natural compounds and biologically active compounds that support health and wellbeing is still scarce. This Special Issue welcomes novel and rigorous research contributions in any of the following topics:

  • Novel information on macro- and micronutrients of non-bovine milks;
  • Safety of non-bovine milks;
  • Health aspects of non-bovine milks (human and animal intervention studies to examine their impact on bone, mood, brain health, etc.);
  • Nutritional effects in infants, adults and senior subjects (metabolism, diet and weight managements, bone health, growth, etc.)

Dr. Alaa El-Din A Bekhit
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-bovine milk
  • macro and micro nutrients
  • safety
  • health aspects
  • nutritional effects

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Lactoferrin Isolation and Hydrolysis from Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) Milk and the Antibacterial Activity of Deer Lactoferrin and Its Hydrolysates
Foods 2020, 9(11), 1711; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9111711 - 21 Nov 2020
Abstract
Lactoferrin (Lf) and other whey proteins have been isolated from red deer milk for the first time using a three-step anion and cation exchange chromatography protocol. The separated deer Lf was subject to in vitro gastric and duodenal digestions to generate peptides. The [...] Read more.
Lactoferrin (Lf) and other whey proteins have been isolated from red deer milk for the first time using a three-step anion and cation exchange chromatography protocol. The separated deer Lf was subject to in vitro gastric and duodenal digestions to generate peptides. The purity of the deer Lf and its hydrolysis products were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The antibacterial activity of the deer Lf and its hydrolysates were investigated and was compared to cow counterpart. Gastric and duodenal digested deer Lf had strong bactericidal activity against E. coli ATCC 25922 with minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of 280 µM and 402 µM, respectively. These results suggest that deer milk contains bioactive whey proteins and can generate bioactive peptides, which can benefit human health by inhibiting food-borne pathogenic bacteria. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Physico-Chemical, Sensory and Texture Properties of an Aged Mexican Manchego-Style Cheese Produced from Hair Sheep Milk
Foods 2020, 9(11), 1666; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9111666 - 15 Nov 2020
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical and texture changes of the Manchego-style cheese produced from hair sheep (Pelibuey) throughout 180 days of ripening, as well as consumer’s acceptance. Cheese pH was constant from 1 to 180 days of ripening. [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical and texture changes of the Manchego-style cheese produced from hair sheep (Pelibuey) throughout 180 days of ripening, as well as consumer’s acceptance. Cheese pH was constant from 1 to 180 days of ripening. Moisture, water activity, fat, elasticity and hardness decreased from day 1 to day 180, while protein, trichloroacetic acid-soluble N and free amino acid increased. Cheese lightness decreased as ripening time increased, while elasticity and hardness decreased. Principal Component Analysis was useful in discriminating cheeses according to their physicochemical composition and that allowed cheeses to be classified in two groups according to their ripening time and this resulted in those with less than 60 days and those with more than 90 days of ripening. Compared with cheeses ripened at 1 and 90 days, aged cheeses at 180 days reduced scores for appearance, color, odor, taste, texture and overall acceptance. Overall, Manchego-style cheeses from hair sheep had the usual ripened-cheese physicochemical changes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of the Supplementation of a Diet Low in Calcium and Phosphorus with Either Sheep Milk or Cow Milk on the Physical and Mechanical Characteristics of Bone using A Rat Model
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1070; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081070 - 07 Aug 2020
Abstract
This study assessed the effect of cow milk (CM) and sheep milk (SM) consumption on the micro-structure, mechanical function, and mineral composition of rat femora in a male weanling rat model. Male weanling rats were fed a basal diet with a 50% reduction [...] Read more.
This study assessed the effect of cow milk (CM) and sheep milk (SM) consumption on the micro-structure, mechanical function, and mineral composition of rat femora in a male weanling rat model. Male weanling rats were fed a basal diet with a 50% reduction in calcium and phosphorus content (low Ca/P-diet) supplemented with either SM or CM. Rats were fed for 28 days, after which the femora were harvested and stored. The femora were analyzed by μ-CT, three-point bending, and inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The addition of either milk to the low Ca/P-diet significantly increased (p < 0.05) trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surface density, trabecular number, cortical bone volume, and maximum force, when compared to rats that consumed only the low Ca/P-diet. The consumption of either milk resulted in a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in trabecular pattern factor, and cortical bone surface to volume ratio when compared to rats that consumed only the low Ca/P-diet. The results were achieved with a lower consumption of SM compared to that of CM (p < 0.05). This work indicates that SM and CM can help overcome the effects on bone of a restriction in calcium and phosphorus intake. Full article
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