Innovative Foods: The Future Food Supply, Nutrition and Health

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2023) | Viewed by 13772

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Agriculture and Food Sciences Discipline, School of Science, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia
Interests: food innovation; novel foods; alternative protein sources; food nutrition and health; food security
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Feeding the growing world population is going to be a global food supply challenge for our existing food systems in the coming decades. Innovation to reshape global food systems through improving local innovative capabilities, enabling infrastructure for agricultural innovation, and facilitating knowledge flow as well as technology dissemination is necessary. Employing new and emerging technologies, including synthetic biology and artificial intelligence, to modernize food production and processing would strengthen efforts to meet the supply challenges in the future.

Currently, food innovation and product development activities are heavily focused on new protein sources to provide alternative to animal-based foods. Allergenicity risk to public health from emerging protein sources such as insects, microalgae, cultured meats, and legumes would need to be managed as these foods are being introduced in the global food supply. Novel food production approaches are equally important for improving food handling and transportation practices, developing processing technologies to enhance the utilization of foods, and providing maximum nutritional benefits to the consumer. Food safety and public health protection are also a key element of emerging global food systems.

The present Special Issue encourages submissions from food scientists, agri-food technologists, food product technologists, microbiologists, and nutritionists working in related fields of science.

Dr. Malik Hussain
Dr. Alaa El-Din A. Bekhit
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food innovation
  • novel foods
  • new protein sources
  • product development
  • food supply chain
  • food shortage
  • food security
  • food and nutrition
  • nutrition and health
  • risk assessment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 180 KiB  
Editorial
Innovative Foods: The Future Food Supply, Nutrition and Health
by Malik Altaf Hussain and Alaa El-Din Ahmed Bekhit
Foods 2023, 12(7), 1359; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12071359 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3088
Abstract
In the coming decades, feeding the growing world population is going to become a global food-supply challenge for our existing food systems [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Foods: The Future Food Supply, Nutrition and Health)

Research

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18 pages, 2434 KiB  
Article
Physicochemical Characteristics, Techno-Functionalities, and Amino Acid Profile of Prionoplus reticularis (Huhu) Larvae and Pupae Protein Extracts
by Ruchita Rao Kavle, Patrick James Nolan, Alaa El-Din Ahmed Bekhit, Alan Carne, James David Morton and Dominic Agyei
Foods 2023, 12(2), 417; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12020417 - 16 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2164
Abstract
The amino acid profile, techno-functionalities (foaming stability/capacity, emulsion stability/capacity, solubility, and coagulation), and physicochemical characteristics (colour, particle size, surface hydrophobicity, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry) of protein extracts (PE) obtained from Prionoplus reticularis (Huhu grub) larvae (HLPE) and pupae (HPPE) were [...] Read more.
The amino acid profile, techno-functionalities (foaming stability/capacity, emulsion stability/capacity, solubility, and coagulation), and physicochemical characteristics (colour, particle size, surface hydrophobicity, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry) of protein extracts (PE) obtained from Prionoplus reticularis (Huhu grub) larvae (HLPE) and pupae (HPPE) were investigated. Total essential amino acid contents of 386.7 and 411.7 mg/g protein were observed in HLPE and HPPE, respectively. The essential amino acid index (EAAI) was 3.3 and 3.4 for HLPE and HPPE, respectively, demonstrating their nutritional equivalence. A unique nitrogen-to-protein conversion constant, k, and the corresponding protein content of the extracts were 6.1 and 6.4 and 72.1% and 76.5%, respectively. HLPE (37.1 J/g) had a lower enthalpy than HPPE (54.1 J/g). HPPE (1% w/v) exhibited a foaming capacity of 50.7%, which was higher than that of HLPE (41.7%) at 150 min. The foaming stability was 75.3% for HLPE and 73.1% for HPPE after 120 min. Both protein extracts (1% w/v) had emulsifying capacities that were 96.8% stable after 60 min. Therefore, protein extracts from Huhu larvae and pupae are of a good nutritional quality (based on their EAAI) and have techno-functional properties, such as foaming and emulsification, that afford them potential for certain food technology applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Foods: The Future Food Supply, Nutrition and Health)
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17 pages, 4906 KiB  
Article
Physical, Nutritional, and Bioactive Properties of Mandacaru Cladode Flour (Cereus jamacaru DC.): An Unconventional Food Plant from the Semi-Arid Brazilian Northeast
by Ana Cristina S. Martins, Gracy Kelly V. de V. Medeiros, Jaielison Yandro P. da Silva, Vanessa B. Viera, Paternak de S. Barros, Marcos dos S. Lima, Marcelo S. da Silva, Josean F. Tavares, Yuri M. do Nascimento, Evandro F. da Silva, Juliana K. B. Soares, Evandro L. de Souza and Maria Elieidy G. de Oliveira
Foods 2022, 11(23), 3814; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11233814 - 26 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2364
Abstract
In this study, we evaluated the physical, nutritional, and bioactive properties of mandacaru cladode flour (Cereus jamacaru DC.). The granulometric profile revealed particles with non-uniform geometry, flakiness, a rectangular tendency, and a non-homogeneous surface, with particle sizes ranging from 20 to 60 [...] Read more.
In this study, we evaluated the physical, nutritional, and bioactive properties of mandacaru cladode flour (Cereus jamacaru DC.). The granulometric profile revealed particles with non-uniform geometry, flakiness, a rectangular tendency, and a non-homogeneous surface, with particle sizes ranging from 20 to 60 µm. The flour presented low water activity (0.423), a moisture content of 8.24 g/100 g, high ash (2.82 g/100 g), protein (5.18 g/100 g), and total carbohydrate contents (74.48 g/100 g), and low lipid contents (1.88 g/100 g). Mandacaru flour is an excellent source of insoluble dietary fiber (48.08 g/100 g), calcium (76.33%), magnesium (15.21%), and potassium (5.94%). Notably, 1H NMR analysis revealed the presence of N-methyltyramine. Using HPLC chromatography, glucose was identified as the predominant sugar (1.33 g/100 g), followed by four organic acids, especially malic acid (9.41 g/100 g) and citric acid (3.96 g/100 g). Eighteen phenolic compounds were detected, with relevant amounts of kaempferol (99.40 mg/100 g), myricetin (72.30 mg/100 g), and resveratrol (17.84 mg/100 g). The total phenolic compounds and flavonoids were 1285.47 mg GAE/100 g and 15.19 mg CE/100 g, respectively. The mean in vitro antioxidant activity values were higher using the FRAP method (249.45 µmol Trolox TEAC/100 g) compared to the ABTS•+ method (0.39 µmol Trolox TEAC/g). Finally, the ascorbic acid had a content of 35.22 mg/100 g. The results demonstrate the value of mandacaru as a little-explored species and an excellent matrix for the development of flours presenting good nutritional value and bioactive constituents with excellent antioxidant potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Foods: The Future Food Supply, Nutrition and Health)
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Review

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21 pages, 708 KiB  
Review
Plant-Based Innovations for the Transition to Sustainability: A Bibliometric and in-Depth Content Analysis
by Małgorzata Krzywonos and Katarzyna Piwowar-Sulej
Foods 2022, 11(19), 3137; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11193137 - 09 Oct 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4802
Abstract
Plants maintain the ecological equilibrium of the earth and stabilize the ecosystem. Today, traditional commodities and new value-added markets can be served simultaneously. There is significant biosource and bioprocess innovation for biobased industrial products. Furthermore, plant-based innovation is associated with the transition to [...] Read more.
Plants maintain the ecological equilibrium of the earth and stabilize the ecosystem. Today, traditional commodities and new value-added markets can be served simultaneously. There is significant biosource and bioprocess innovation for biobased industrial products. Furthermore, plant-based innovation is associated with the transition to sustainability. This study performed a bibliometric and in-depth content analysis to review plant-based innovations in the research field between 1995 and 2022. A set of 313 articles was identified from the Scopus and Web of Science databases. Different analytical scientometric tools (topic mapping and overlay visualization networks) were used to analyze 124 articles; the most influential countries, institutions, authors, journals and articles were identified. Through in-depth studies, based on the grounded theory approach, five leading research areas related to plant-based innovation were determined: (1) agricultural/environmental innovation, (2) plant-based food or feed innovation, (3) innovation within the medical/pharmaceutical research area, (4) technology-related innovation and (5) economic/business aspects of plant-based innovations. Future research directions include exploring less examined and new topics, such as the sustainability implications of incorporating various plant-based foods and Industry 4.0 in plant-based innovation, and linking and developing findings from different research areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Foods: The Future Food Supply, Nutrition and Health)
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