Trends and Prospects in Novel Meat Products with Healthier Properties

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2024 | Viewed by 7159

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
Interests: meat products; sensory analysis; lipid oxidation

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Guest Editor
Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Campus de Santa Apolónia, Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Interests: meat science; meat quality; meat products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Departmento de Tecnologia e Ciência de Alimentos, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria 97105-900, Brazil
Interests: meat products; emerging technologies; bioactive compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meat products are an excellent source of high-biological-value proteins and have a high content of minerals, vitamins, and bioactive compounds. However, meat products contain compounds that can cause various adverse health effects and pose a serious health threat to humans. In this sense, this Special Issue of Foods is focused on current strategies to assist in the development of healthier meat products. Short communications, original research, and review articles are all welcome.

The potential topics are focused, but are not limited to, the following fields:

  • Strategies to reduce sodium and animal fat in meat products.
  • Strategies to make the lipid profile of meat products more nutritionally advantageous for human health.
  • Strategies to reduce substances of safety concern in meat products like phosphates, nitrites, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic aromatic amines, and products from lipid and protein oxidation.
  • Strategies to incorporate bioactive compounds in meat products.

Dr. Bibiana Alves Dos Santos
Prof. Dr. Alfredo Jorge Costa Teixeira
Prof. Dr. Paulo Cezar Bastianello Campagnol
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • healthier meat products
  • low-sodium
  • low-fat
  • substances of safety concern
  • lipid profile
  • bioactive compounds

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 866 KiB  
Article
Innovative Applications of Tenebrio molitor Larvae in the Production of Sustainable Meat Sausages: Quality and Safety Aspects
by Agnė Jankauskienė, Sandra Kiseliovienė, Dominykas Aleknavičius, Ieva Miliūnaitė, Sigita Kerzienė, Žydrūnė Gaižauskaitė, Ignė Juknienė, Paulina Zaviztanavičiūtė and Aistė Kabašinskienė
Foods 2024, 13(10), 1451; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13101451 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 660
Abstract
With the world’s population continuing to grow, ensuring sustainable protein sources for everyone is becoming increasingly challenging. Despite meat being considered unsustainable, people find it challenging to abstain from consuming it. However, one solution to this dilemma could be the incorporation of mealworms [...] Read more.
With the world’s population continuing to grow, ensuring sustainable protein sources for everyone is becoming increasingly challenging. Despite meat being considered unsustainable, people find it challenging to abstain from consuming it. However, one solution to this dilemma could be the incorporation of mealworms into conventional meat products, i.e., sausages. The incorporation of mealworms into sausage formulations appears to shift the fatty acid profile towards higher levels of monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly omega-3s, potentially enhancing the nutritional value and offering health benefits. Therefore, our study aimed to improve the nutritional value and safety parameters of traditional sausages by enriching them with the flour of mealworm larvae. For this purpose, the larvae were reared on a sustainable substrate with brewery by-products, brewer’s yeast, and carrots. They were used frozen and freeze-dried in sausage recipes, replacing pork in different proportions. The analysis of the product’s chemical safety parameters (biogenic amines, nitrates and nitrites, volatile fatty acids (FA), and peroxide) and nutritional value (including collagen, cholesterol, amino acids, FA, and hydroxyproline) was carried out in an accredited laboratory. The results of our study have demonstrated that the incorporation of mealworms into sausages, particularly through freeze-drying, increased fat content and enhanced the profile of FA, including omega-3s while reducing protein and cholesterol levels, and altering collagen content, suggesting improved nutritional value and potential health benefits without compromising the safety of the product. Therefore, we are highlighting that the addition of mealworms influences the quality of amino acids positively and maintains biogenic amine levels within safe limits, alongside a negligible impact on nitrates and nitrites and a reduction in peroxide values. These findings indicate an overall improvement in sausage quality and safety without compromising safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends and Prospects in Novel Meat Products with Healthier Properties)
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17 pages, 1685 KiB  
Article
Zinc Protoporphyrin-Rich Pork Liver Homogenates as Coloring Ingredients in Nitrite-Free Liver Pâtés
by Mar Llauger, Luis Guerrero, Jacint Arnau, Afra Morera, Jun-ichi Wakamatsu, José M. Lorenzo and Ricard Bou
Foods 2024, 13(4), 533; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040533 - 9 Feb 2024
Viewed by 975
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the coloring ingredient potential of liver homogenates that form Zn protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a natural red pigment, after anaerobic incubation. Liver homogenates were used to develop nitrite-free sterile pork liver pâtés. These homogenates were applied in the formulation of [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the coloring ingredient potential of liver homogenates that form Zn protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a natural red pigment, after anaerobic incubation. Liver homogenates were used to develop nitrite-free sterile pork liver pâtés. These homogenates were applied in the formulation of pâtés directly or after centrifugation to obtain a pellet that was highly concentrated in ZnPP. Both the whole homogenate and its insoluble fraction were adjusted to pH 7.5 before their use in the formulation of pâtés with and without antioxidant (0.5% ascorbate plus 0.1% tocopherol) addition. Pâtés formulated with the whole homogenate showed color and texture characteristics that were similar to those of the positive control with nitrite. However, high levels of the insoluble fraction also led to pâtés with improved color characteristics but with a two-fold softened texture. Therefore, the form and amount of ZnPP added played roles in the final appearance of the product. The ZnPP pigment was more stable than heme in the sterilization treatment, and antioxidant addition proved to be unnecessary. The ZnPP-rich ingredients allowed for the preparation of nitrite-free cooked liver pâtés with a stable red color and could thus be potentially applied in other uncured cooked meat products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends and Prospects in Novel Meat Products with Healthier Properties)
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17 pages, 691 KiB  
Article
Study of the Oxidative and Microbiological Stability of Nitrite-Reduced, Vacuum-Packed, Refrigerated Lamb Sausages Supplemented with Red Propolis Extract
by Luciana Ruggeri Menezes Gotardo, Francisco Allan Leandro de Carvalho, Dannaya Julliethy Gomes Quirino, Carmen Sílvia Favaro-Trindade, Severino Mathias de Alencar, Alessandra Lopes de Oliveira and Marco Antonio Trindade
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4419; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244419 - 9 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 964
Abstract
Vacuum-packed lamb sausages with or without red propolis extract and a reduced sodium nitrite content were evaluated for oxidative and microbiological stability during storage for 21 days at 2 °C. The following treatments were evaluated: EN150 (control, base formulation (BF) + 500 mg/kg [...] Read more.
Vacuum-packed lamb sausages with or without red propolis extract and a reduced sodium nitrite content were evaluated for oxidative and microbiological stability during storage for 21 days at 2 °C. The following treatments were evaluated: EN150 (control, base formulation (BF) + 500 mg/kg sodium erythorbate and 150 mg/kg sodium nitrite); EN75 (BF + 500 mg/kg sodium erythorbate and 75 mg/kg sodium nitrite); P1N75 (without the addition of erythorbate, BF + 1800 mg/kg propolis extract and 75 mg/kg sodium nitrite); and P2N75 (without the addition of erythorbate, BF + 3600 mg/kg propolis extract and 75 mg/kg sodium nitrite). Analyses were conducted to characterize the samples on day 0 with respect to the proximate composition (moisture, protein, fat, and ash) and sensory acceptance. Stability during refrigerated storage was evaluated on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 for the parameters pH, color profile (L*, a*, and b*), TBARs index (oxidative stability) and microbiological count of aerobic psychrotrophic microorganisms. Texture profile, cooking weight loss (WLC), peroxide index and free fatty acids were evaluated on days 0 and 21. The treatments with propolis and reduced nitrite (EN150 and P1N75) showed a red color intensity (a*) similar to the treatment with erythorbate and the same nitrite content (EN75) at the end of storage, maintaining the characteristic reddish color of the sausages. The extract slowed down lipid oxidation during storage, especially P2N75, which showed the lowest level of TBARS (0.39 mg MDA/kg) and the peroxide index (2.13 mEq g O2) on day 21. The residual nitrite value in EN75 was the lowest (p < 0.05) on day 21, showing that synthetic antioxidants are more efficient than the extract in nitrite reduction reactions. The results for the counts of psychrotrophic microorganisms showed that the extract did not have the expected antimicrobial effect on the growth of this microorganisms, and leveling the results revealed no differences (p < 0.05) between the treatments. Despite the red propolis extract not showing a significant antimicrobial improvement in lamb sausages, it can be considered a healthy option with good prospects for replacing synthetic antioxidants with a natural product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends and Prospects in Novel Meat Products with Healthier Properties)
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12 pages, 4040 KiB  
Article
Effect of Transglutaminase Treatment on the Structure and Sensory Properties of Rice- or Soy-Based Hybrid Sausages
by Mirian dos Santos, Wanessa Oliveira Ribeiro, Jamille de Sousa Monteiro, Bibiana Alves dos Santos, Paulo Cezar Bastianello Campagnol and Marise Aparecida Rodrigues Pollonio
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4226; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234226 - 23 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1115
Abstract
Partial substitution of meat with non-protein sources in hybrid meat products generally leads to a decrease in texture attributes and, consequently, in sensory acceptance. In this study, we investigated the effects of transglutaminase (TG) at two concentrations (0.25% and 0.5%) on the physicochemical, [...] Read more.
Partial substitution of meat with non-protein sources in hybrid meat products generally leads to a decrease in texture attributes and, consequently, in sensory acceptance. In this study, we investigated the effects of transglutaminase (TG) at two concentrations (0.25% and 0.5%) on the physicochemical, textural, and sensory properties of hybrid sausages formulated with concentrated soy or rice proteins. TG caused a reduction in the heat treatment yield of hybrid sausages, particularly those made with rice protein. pH and color parameters were marginally affected by TG addition. Texture parameters increased substantially with TG, although escalating the TG level from 0.25% to 0.5% did not result in a proportional improvement in texture parameters; in fact, for rice-based hybrid sausages, no difference was achieved for all attributes, while only cohesiveness and chewiness were improved for soy-based ones. TG enhanced the sensory attributes of soy-based hybrid sausages to a level comparable to control meat emulsion, as evidenced by ordinate preference score and projective mapping. Our findings suggest that TG is a viable strategy for enhancing texture and sensory parameters in hybrid sausages, particularly for plant proteins that exhibit greater compatibility with the meat matrix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends and Prospects in Novel Meat Products with Healthier Properties)
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14 pages, 1520 KiB  
Article
Partial Replacement of NaCl by KCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2 Chloride Salts in the Production of Sucuk: Effects on Volatile Compounds, Lipid Oxidation, Microbiological and Sensory Properties
by Derya Şimşek, Zeynep Feyza Yılmaz Oral, Rahimeh Jaberi, Mükerrem Kaya and Güzin Kaban
Foods 2023, 12(19), 3525; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12193525 - 22 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1118
Abstract
The effects of different chloride salt mixtures (I-control: 100% NaCl, II: 50:50—NaCl:KCl, III: 50:30:20—NaCl:KCl:MgCl2, IV: 50:30:20—NaCl:KCl:CaCl2, V: 50:30:10:10—NaCl:KCl:MgCl2:CaCl2) on the quality properties of sucuk (a dry fermented beef sausage) during ripening were investigated. Lactic acid [...] Read more.
The effects of different chloride salt mixtures (I-control: 100% NaCl, II: 50:50—NaCl:KCl, III: 50:30:20—NaCl:KCl:MgCl2, IV: 50:30:20—NaCl:KCl:CaCl2, V: 50:30:10:10—NaCl:KCl:MgCl2:CaCl2) on the quality properties of sucuk (a dry fermented beef sausage) during ripening were investigated. Lactic acid bacteria reached 8 log cfu/g in the 3 days of fermentation in all treatments. However, salt mixtures including MgCl2 caused an increase in Micrococcus/Staphylococcus. The control group showed the lowest mean aw value at the end of ripening. The salt mixture with 20% CaCl2 showed the lowest mean pH value of 4.97. The mean TBARS value varied between 6.34 and 6.97 µmol MDA/kg but was not affected by the salt mixtures (p > 0.05). According to the results of PCA, salt mixtures I, II and III had a positive correlation in PC1, and PC1 also separated salt mixtures with CaCl2 (IV and V) from other groups. In addition, a strong positive correlation between the control and III group (50:30:20—NaCl:KCl:MgCl2) for sensory properties was determined by heatmap clustering analysis. In addition, the principal component analysis showed that the control, II, and III groups had a stronger correlation with each other for volatile compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends and Prospects in Novel Meat Products with Healthier Properties)
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19 pages, 1927 KiB  
Article
Replacing Animal Fat with Gels of Psyllium Fiber and Combined Linseed Oil–Psyllium Fiber in Salamis: Impacts on Technological, Nutritional, Oxidative, and Sensory Properties
by Marcos Roberto Casarin Jovanovichs, Mariana Basso Pinton, Leticia Pereira Correa, Douglas Pedro, Carlos Augusto Mallmann, Roger Wagner, Alexandre José Cichoski, José Manuel Lorenzo, Alfredo Jorge Costa Teixeira, Paulo Cezar Bastianello Campagnol and Bibiana Alves dos Santos
Foods 2023, 12(13), 2439; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12132439 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1693
Abstract
This study produced two gels: one solely using psyllium fiber (GP) and another combining this fiber with linseed oil (GL+P). Both gels replaced 15% and 30% of the animal fat content of salamis. The objective was to evaluate the impact of this lipid [...] Read more.
This study produced two gels: one solely using psyllium fiber (GP) and another combining this fiber with linseed oil (GL+P). Both gels replaced 15% and 30% of the animal fat content of salamis. The objective was to evaluate the impact of this lipid reformulation on the technological, nutritional, oxidative, and sensory properties of the salamis. The lipid reformulation did not alter the evolution of pH and lactic acid bacteria during processing. The addition of GL+P did not interfere with the product’s drying process. However, replacing 30% of animal fat with the GP resulted in greater weight loss and a lower final Aw value. The lipid reformulation minimally affected the color of the salamis but significantly enhanced their nutritional profile. This improvement was marked by a decrease in fat content and an increase in protein. Specifically, in the samples with GL+P, there was a rise in linolenic acid content and a reduction in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. Adding GP did not affect the salamis’ oxidative stability and sensory profile. However, substituting 30% of the animal fat with GL+P increased the TBARS values, and volatile compounds derived from lipid oxidation hampered the products’ sensory profiles. A reduction in these negative effects was observed when replacing 15% of the fat with GL+P, suggesting this to be the ideal dosage for balancing the nutritional benefits with maintaining the product’s oxidative stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends and Prospects in Novel Meat Products with Healthier Properties)
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