Advances in Methods and Technologies for Carcass and Meat Quality Evaluation

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 6851

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CECAV-Veterinary and Animal Research Centre and AL4AnimalS-Associate Laboratory of Animal and Veterinary Science, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: carcass composition; meat quality; image and spectroscopic methods for carcass evaluation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Campus de Santa Apolónia, Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Interests: meat science; meat quality; meat products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interest in the use of advanced methods and technologies has been increasing in the meat industry, which needs objective and reliable data on the evaluation of carcass and meat quality. These data and the information associated with them ensure a consistent assessment of carcass and meat quality and prices for meat industry stakeholders and consumers. In this Special Issue of Foods, we stimulate the submission of manuscripts, both original research and review articles, related to advanced methods and technologies for carcass and meat quality evaluations. While we are interested in all kinds of advanced methods and technologies, we accept the submission of manuscripts dealing with imaging and spectroscopic techniques, primarily non-invasive and non-destructive. We also welcome manuscripts related to traceability and authentication and omics methodologies. In a broader sense, meat quality includes sensory quality and food safety, which will also be a subject to be addressed in the Special Issue.

Dr. Severiano R. Silva
Prof. Dr. Alfredo Jorge Costa Teixeira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advances in methods and technologies
  • meat
  • carcass
  • non-invasive and non-destructive
  • imaging and spectroscopic techniques

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1604 KiB  
Article
Can Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Replace a Panel of Tasters in Sensory Analysis of Dry-Cured Bísaro Loin?
by Lia Vasconcelos, Luís G. Dias, Ana Leite, Iasmin Ferreira, Etelvina Pereira, Evandro Bona, Javier Mateo, Sandra Rodrigues and Alfredo Teixeira
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4335; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234335 - 1 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1459
Abstract
This study involved a comprehensive examination of sensory attributes in dry-cured Bísaro loins, including odor, androsterone, scatol, lean color, fat color, hardness, juiciness, chewiness, flavor intensity and flavor persistence. An analysis of 40 samples revealed a wide variation in these attributes, ensuring a [...] Read more.
This study involved a comprehensive examination of sensory attributes in dry-cured Bísaro loins, including odor, androsterone, scatol, lean color, fat color, hardness, juiciness, chewiness, flavor intensity and flavor persistence. An analysis of 40 samples revealed a wide variation in these attributes, ensuring a robust margin for multivariate calibration purposes. The respective near-infrared (NIR) spectra unveiled distinct peaks associated with significant components, such as proteins, lipids and water. Support vector regression (SVR) models were methodically calibrated for all sensory attributes, with optimal results using multiplicative scattering correction pre-treatment, MinMax normalization and the radial base kernel (non-linear SVR model). This process involved partitioning the data into calibration (67%) and prediction (33%) subsets using the SPXY algorithm. The model parameters were optimized via a hybrid algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) to effectively minimize the root-mean-square error (RMSECV) derived from five-fold cross-validation and ensure the attainment of optimal model performance and predictive accuracy. The predictive models exhibited acceptable results, characterized by R-squared values close to 1 (0.9616–0.9955) and low RMSE values (0.0400–0.1031). The prediction set’s relative standard deviation (RSD) remained under 5%. Comparisons with prior research revealed significant improvements in prediction accuracy, particularly when considering attributes like pig meat aroma, hardness, fat color and flavor intensity. This research underscores the potential of advanced analytical techniques to improve the precision of sensory evaluations in food quality assessment. Such advancements have the potential to benefit both the research community and the meat industry by closely aligning their practices with consumer preferences and expectations. Full article
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10 pages, 3229 KiB  
Article
The Degradation of Intramuscular Connective Tissue In Vitro with Purified Cathepsin L from Bovine Pancreas
by Yingbo Peng, Wanhong He, Shuang Teng and Muneer Ahmed Jamali
Foods 2023, 12(18), 3517; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12183517 - 21 Sep 2023
Viewed by 804
Abstract
To investigate the possible degradation of the intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) with cathepsin L, isolated IMCTs were incubated with purified cathepsin L in vitro. Here, we prepared purified cathepsin L from bovine pancreas by using DEAE Sephacel, Sephacryl S-100 HR, SP Sepharose FF, [...] Read more.
To investigate the possible degradation of the intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) with cathepsin L, isolated IMCTs were incubated with purified cathepsin L in vitro. Here, we prepared purified cathepsin L from bovine pancreas by using DEAE Sephacel, Sephacryl S-100 HR, SP Sepharose FF, and con A-Sepharose affinity chromatography in sequence. An SDS-PAGE analysis of CNBr-digested peptides showed that the degradation of collagen in IMCT could take place on terminal non-helical peptides rather than the triple helix region. Decorin (DCN) was clearly degraded at a pH of 5.0. The TP and TO of intramuscular connective tissue decreased to 41.41 °C and 43.79 °C, respectively. In the cathepsin L treatment of pH 5.0, the decreases in the TP and TO of IMCT were more sensitive than they were at pH 5.5~6.5. Full article
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16 pages, 1419 KiB  
Article
Functional Quality Characteristics of the Meat from a Dual-Purpose Poultry Crossbreed Suitable for Backyard Rearing in Comparison to Commercial Broilers
by Rekha Sharma, Renuka Sehrawat, Sonika Ahlawat, Vivek Sharma, Mohan Singh Thakur, A. K. Mishra, Reena Arora and M. S. Tantia
Foods 2023, 12(13), 2434; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12132434 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1451
Abstract
Backyard poultry farming contributes to food security, nutrition, and the regular income of rural farmers in India. Their products have a niche market here and fetch higher prices than those of commercial poultry. Improved varieties are being developed to overcome the slow growth, [...] Read more.
Backyard poultry farming contributes to food security, nutrition, and the regular income of rural farmers in India. Their products have a niche market here and fetch higher prices than those of commercial poultry. Improved varieties are being developed to overcome the slow growth, late sexual maturity, and low production of indigenous breeds, while retaining their positive attributes. A comprehensive study was conducted to analyze the functional attributes of meat from the Jabalpur color (JBC), a colored, improved dual-purpose synthetic line, developed by Nanaji Deshmukh Veterinary Science University, Jabalpur, India. The birds were managed in a deep litter system under a backyard type of housing (night shelter and free range). Primal meat cuts (breast and thigh) of the male birds (n = 20/group) were evaluated at the age of marketing. The corresponding attributes were compared with the results obtained for commercial Cobb (400) broilers. The protein concentration of JBC breast (25.65 ± 0.39 g/100 g of tissue) and thigh (19.04 ± 0.23 g/100 g of tissue) meat was superior (p ≤ 0.05) to that of Cobb broilers. Established assays (in vitro) identified a better (p ≤ 0.05) antioxidation capacity in the JBC meat. High-performance liquid chromatography confirmed a considerable quantity of functional biomolecules (carnosine, anserine, and creatine) in the JBC breast and thigh meat extracts. The average carnosine concentration (mg/g of tissue) was 2.66 ± 0.09 and 1.11 ± 0.04 in the JBC breast and thigh meat, respectively. The mRNA expression was quantified by qRT-PCR for the carnosine-related genes: β-alanine transporter (SLC36A1), carnosine-synthesizing enzyme (CARNS1), and carnosine-degrading enzyme (CNDP2); this explained the comparable carnosine in the JBC and Cobb meat. Meat extracts from both genetic groups (JBC and Cobb) had high anti-glycation potential. Higher protein content and antioxidant capacity, along with the bioactive dipeptides in the JBC meat, herald exciting research opportunities for its use in improving the traditional backyard poultry farming system. Full article
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15 pages, 4589 KiB  
Article
SVM Regression to Assess Meat Characteristics of Bísaro Pig Loins Using NIRS Methodology
by Lia Vasconcelos, Luís G. Dias, Ana Leite, Iasmin Ferreira, Etelvina Pereira, Severiano Silva, Sandra Rodrigues and Alfredo Teixeira
Foods 2023, 12(3), 470; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12030470 - 19 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2291
Abstract
This study evaluates the ability of the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to estimate the aW, protein, moisture, ash, fat, collagen, texture, pigments, and WHC in the Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) of Bísaro pig. Samples (n = 40) of the LTL [...] Read more.
This study evaluates the ability of the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to estimate the aW, protein, moisture, ash, fat, collagen, texture, pigments, and WHC in the Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) of Bísaro pig. Samples (n = 40) of the LTL muscle were minced and scanned in an FT-NIR MasterTM N500 (BÜCHI) over a NIR spectral range of 4000–10,000 cm−1 with a resolution of 4 cm−1. The PLS and SVM regression models were developed using the spectra’s math treatment, DV1, DV2, MSC, SNV, and SMT (n = 40). PLS models showed acceptable fits (estimation models with RMSE ≤ 0.5% and R2 ≥ 0.95) except for the RT variable (RMSE of 0.891% and R2 of 0.748). The SVM models presented better overall prediction results than those obtained by PLS, where only the variables pigments and WHC presented estimation models (respectively: RMSE of 0.069 and 0.472%; R2 of 0.993 and 0.996; slope of 0.985 ± 0.006 and 0.925 ± 0.006). The results showed NIRs capacity to predict the meat quality traits of Bísaro pig breed in order to guarantee its characterization. Full article
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