Special Issue "Browning Reactions in Foods. Impact on Nutrition, Safety and Health"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria Dolores del Castillo
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Food Bioscience Group, Department of Bioactivity and Food Analysis, Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the Autonoma University of Madrid (UAM), Nicolás Cabrera 9, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: bioactive compounds; diet; dietary fiber; food processing and health; food quality and safety; functional foods; human nutrition and health; novel ingredients and foods; food waste recovery into healthy ingredients
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jose Manuel Silvan
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias de la Alimentación (CIAL) (CSIC-UAM) CEI (CSIC+UAM), C/ Nicolás Cabrera, 9, Campus de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: food microbiology and safety; foodborne pathogens; food by-products; Campylobacter spp.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning reactions have a great impact on food quality, in terms of both nutritional and sensorial properties, as well as safety. These reactions take place during food processing and storage, giving rise to the formation of compounds with positive and negative properties. The reactions affect thermally-processed and unprocessed foods. Foods are complex matrices composed of a wide number of compounds with particular functions that are dramatically modified by browning reactions. Either nutrients or bioactive compounds are substrates for browning reactions. The degree of progress of reactions depends on many factors. Simplified food model systems and mathematical tools are useful for a better and easier comprehension of the reactions. The application of advanced analytical approaches, including “omics” and other approaches, are required for the identification and quantification of browning products; as well as a better understating of their mechanisms of action and health implications. Several Innovative food-processing strategies to avoid the negative impacts of browning in food quality, safety, and health, are matters of study. Food waste may be a sustainable source of natural inhibitors of browning. Nowadays, due to the great implications in food and health of browning products, a great deal of information in that field is available. Consequently, a critical review of the state-of-the-art on this matter would contribute to establishing new priority research lines in that particular field. On the other hand, it would be very welcome for the food industry and may stimulate synergy between academy and the food industry.

Dr. Dolores del Castillo
Dr. Jose Manuel Silvan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Browning reactions
  • Browning inhibitors
  • Browning chemical indicators
  • Enzymatic browning
  • Non-enzymatic browning
  • Food quality
  • Food processing
  • Food storage
  • Food safety
  • Maillard reaction
  • Caramelization
  • Lipid oxidation
  • Ascorbic acid oxidation
  • Omics technologies
  • Polyphenol oxidation
  • Polyphenol oxidase
  • Sustainable sources of browning inhibitors
  • Biological properties
  • Browning reactions and health

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Inhibition of the Maillard Reaction by Phytochemicals Composing an Aqueous Coffee Silverskin Extract via a Mixed Mechanism of Action
Foods 2019, 8(10), 438; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100438 - 25 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This work aimed to evaluate the contribution of isoflavones and melatonin to the aqueous extract obtained from the coffee silverskin (CSE) antiglycative properties, which has not been previously studied. To achieve this goal, two model systems constituted by bovine serum albumin (BSA) and [...] Read more.
This work aimed to evaluate the contribution of isoflavones and melatonin to the aqueous extract obtained from the coffee silverskin (CSE) antiglycative properties, which has not been previously studied. To achieve this goal, two model systems constituted by bovine serum albumin (BSA) and reactive carbonyls (glucose or methylglyoxal) in the presence or absence of pure phytochemicals (chlorogenic acid (CGA), genistein, and melatonin) and CSE were employed. Glucose was used to evaluate the effect on the formation of glycation products formed mainly in the early stage of the reaction, while methylglyoxal was employed for looking at the formation of advanced products of the reaction, also called methylglyoxal-derivative advanced glycation end products (AGE) or glycoxidation products. CGA inhibited the formation of fructosamine, while genistein and melatonin inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products and protein glycoxidation. It was also observed that phenolic compounds from CSE inhibited protein glycation and glycoxidation by forming BSA–phytochemical complexes. CSE showed a significant antiglycative effect (p < 0.05). Variations in the UV-Vis spectrum and the antioxidant capacity of protein fractions suggested the formation of protein–phytochemical complexes. Fluorescence quenching and in silico analysis supported the formation of antioxidant–protein complexes. For the first time, we illustrate that isoflavones and melatonin may contribute to the antiglycative/antiglycoxidative properties associated with CSE. CGA, isoflavones, and melatonin composing CSE seem to act simultaneously by different mechanisms of action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Browning Reactions in Foods. Impact on Nutrition, Safety and Health)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Maternal Consumption of a Diet Rich in Maillard Reaction Products Accelerates Neurodevelopment in F1 and Sex-Dependently Affects Behavioral Phenotype in F2 Rat Offspring
Foods 2019, 8(5), 168; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8050168 - 17 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Thermal processing of foods at temperatures > 100 °C introduces considerable amounts of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) into the diet. Maternal dietary exposure might affect the offspring early development and behavioral phenotype in later life. In a rat model, we examined the influence [...] Read more.
Thermal processing of foods at temperatures > 100 °C introduces considerable amounts of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) into the diet. Maternal dietary exposure might affect the offspring early development and behavioral phenotype in later life. In a rat model, we examined the influence of maternal (F0) dietary challenge with AGEs-rich diet (AGE-RD) during puberty, pregnancy and lactation on early development, a manifestation of physiological reflexes, and behavioral phenotype of F1 and F2 offspring. Mean postnatal day of auditory conduit and eye opening, or incisor eruption was not affected by F0 diet significantly. F1 AGE-RD offspring outperformed their control counterparts in hind limb placing, in grasp tests and surface righting; grandsons of AGE-RD dams outperformed their control counterparts in hind limb placing and granddaughters in surface righting. In a Morris water maze, female AGE-RD F1 and F2 offspring presented better working memory compared with a control group of female offspring. Furthermore, male F2 AGE-RD offspring manifested anxiolysis-like behavior in a light dark test. Mean grooming time in response to sucrose splash did not differ between dietary groups. Our findings indicate that long-term maternal intake of AGE-RD intergenerationally and sex-specifically affects development and behavioral traits of offspring which have never come into direct contact with AGE-RD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Browning Reactions in Foods. Impact on Nutrition, Safety and Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Occurrence of Furosine and Hydroxymethylfurfural in Breakfast Cereals. Evolution of the Spanish Market from 2006 to 2018
Foods 2019, 8(5), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8050158 - 10 May 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The demand for healthier products has led the breakfast cereal sector to develop new formulations to improve the nutritional profile of breakfast cereals; however, the increase in chemical risks should also be evaluated. Amadori compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are Maillard reaction products applied [...] Read more.
The demand for healthier products has led the breakfast cereal sector to develop new formulations to improve the nutritional profile of breakfast cereals; however, the increase in chemical risks should also be evaluated. Amadori compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are Maillard reaction products applied as heat damage indices in breakfast cereals. Furosine (a synthetic amino acid formed by acid hydrolysis of Amadori compounds) is linked to the loss of protein quality, while HMF has exhibited toxicological effects in cells and animals. Furosine and HMF content was evaluated in Spanish breakfast cereals whereas the effect of protein, fibre, and sugar content, the type of grain, the presence of honey, and the manufacturing process were discussed, as well as compared with a previous prospective study. The average furosine and HMF contents were 182 mg/kg and 21.7 mg/kg, respectively. Protein and fibre content were directly related to the furosine content, whereas sugar level, honey addition, and the manufacturing process affected the content of HMF. Occurrence of furosine and HMF decreased nearly 40% in a decade (2006–2018). These findings are relevant in terms of nutritional score, since lysine availability is preserved, but also from a toxicological point of view, due to the decreased daily exposure to both compounds, which dropped 30%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Browning Reactions in Foods. Impact on Nutrition, Safety and Health)
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Open AccessArticle
An Assessment of the Bioactivity of Coffee Silverskin Melanoidins
Foods 2019, 8(2), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8020068 - 12 Feb 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Melanoidins present in coffee silverskin, the only by-product of the roasting process, are formed via the Maillard reaction. The exact structure, biological properties, and mechanism of action of coffee silverskin melanoidins, remain unknown. This research work aimed to contribute to this novel knowledge. [...] Read more.
Melanoidins present in coffee silverskin, the only by-product of the roasting process, are formed via the Maillard reaction. The exact structure, biological properties, and mechanism of action of coffee silverskin melanoidins, remain unknown. This research work aimed to contribute to this novel knowledge. To achieve this goal, melanoidins were obtained from an aqueous extract of Arabica coffee silverskin (WO2013004873A1) and was isolated through ultrafiltration (>10 kDa). The isolation protocol was optimized and the chemical composition of the high molecular weight fraction (>10 kDa) was evaluated, by analyzing the content of protein, caffeine, chlorogenic acid, and the total dietary fiber. In addition, the structural analysis was performed by infrared spectroscopy. Antioxidant properties were studied in vitro and the fiber effect was studied in vivo, in healthy male Wistar rats. Melanoidins were administered to animals in the drinking water at a dose of 1 g/kg. At the fourth week of treatment, gastrointestinal motility was evaluated through non-invasive radiographic means. In conclusion, the isolation process was effective in obtaining a high molecular weight fraction, composed mainly of dietary fiber, including melanoidins, with in vitro antioxidant capacity and in vivo dietary fiber effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Browning Reactions in Foods. Impact on Nutrition, Safety and Health)
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