Special Issue "Sustainable Nutrition and Health Based on Coffee, Tea, and Cocoa"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria Dolores del Castillo
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Food Bioscience Group, Department of Bioactivity and Food Analysis, Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the Autonoma University of Madrid (UAM), Nicolás Cabrera 9, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: bioactive compounds; diet; dietary fiber; food processing and health; food quality and safety; functional foods; human nutrition and health; novel ingredients and foods; food waste recovery into healthy ingredients
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Nikolai Kuhnert
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen, Germany
Interests: food processing; mass spectrometry; structure identification; analytical method development; metabolomics; food quality and safety; bioactive compounds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to submit your research articles to the Special Cocotea 2019 edition of Nutrients. We greatly enjoyed your scientific contributions at the latest edition of the Cocotea conference 2019 at Jacobs University in Bremen and very much hope that you will summarize or extend your presented research findings in the form of a full scientific paper to be submitted to Nutrients. We hope that the Special Issue will represent well the diverse and interdisciplinary nature of research at a high level on coffee, cocoa, and tea. In particular, we welcome submissions in the fields of nutrition, health effects, technology, valorization of waste products, and novel technologies and products to this edition.

The deadline for submissions will be 30th January 2020.

Dr. Maria Dolores del Castillo
Prof. Dr. Nikolai Kuhnert
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Raw and Roasted Cocoa Bean Extracts Supplementation on Intestinal Enzyme Activity, Biochemical Parameters, and Antioxidant Status in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 889; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040889 - 25 Mar 2020
Abstract
The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of diet containing the polyphenol-rich material on intestinal enzyme activity, oxidative stress markers, lipid metabolism and antioxidant status of laboratory rats. The animals were fed high-fat diet supplemented with freeze-dried water extracts of [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of diet containing the polyphenol-rich material on intestinal enzyme activity, oxidative stress markers, lipid metabolism and antioxidant status of laboratory rats. The animals were fed high-fat diet supplemented with freeze-dried water extracts of raw and roasted cocoa beans of Forastero variety. The observed changes indicated the biological activity of polyphenols and other components of the prepared cocoa beans extracts (CBEs). The presence of raw and roasted CBEs in the diets diversified the activity of the enzymes of the cecal microflora of rats. Both CBEs beneficially affect the antioxidant status of the serum, even in relation to the control standard group. The experimental cocoa bean preparations showed no significant effect on the mass of rats’ liver, heart, and kidneys, but varied some parameters of the antioxidant status of their organisms. The raw CBE in rats fed with the high-fat diet shows a high ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation in heart and more effectively increases hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations compared to the roasted CBE, which did not show any significant effect. Moreover, supplementation with both CBEs significantly affects the volatile fatty acids concentration in the rats’ cecum. Results of this study contribute to the evidence that dietary supplementation with raw and roasted CBEs can exert health-promoting effects, however further studies are necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Nutrition and Health Based on Coffee, Tea, and Cocoa)
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Open AccessArticle
In Vitro Hypocholesterolemic Effect of Coffee Compounds
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 437; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020437 - 09 Feb 2020
Abstract
(1) Background: Cholesterol bioaccessibility is an indicator of cholesterol that is available for absorption and therefore can be a measure of hypocholesterolemic potential. In this work, the effect of commercial espresso coffee and coffee extracts on cholesterol solubility are studied in an in [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Cholesterol bioaccessibility is an indicator of cholesterol that is available for absorption and therefore can be a measure of hypocholesterolemic potential. In this work, the effect of commercial espresso coffee and coffee extracts on cholesterol solubility are studied in an in vitro model composed by glycodeoxycholic bile salt, as a measure of its bioaccessibility. (2) Methods: Polysaccharide extracts from coffees obtained with different extraction conditions were purified by selective precipitation with ethanol, and their sugars content were characterized by GC-FID. Hexane extraction allowed us to obtain the coffee lipids. Espresso coffee samples and extracts were tested regarding their concentration dependence on the solubility of labeled 13C-4 cholesterol by bile salt micelles, using quantitative 13C NMR. (3) Results and Discussion: Espresso coffee and coffee extracts were rich in polysaccharides, mainly arabinogalactans and galactomannans. These polysaccharides decrease cholesterol solubility and, simultaneously, the bile salts’ concentration. Coffee lipid extracts were also found to decrease cholesterol solubility, although not affecting bile salt concentration. (4) Conclusions: Coffee soluble fiber, composed by the arabinogalactans and galactomannans, showed to sequester bile salts from the solution, leading to a decrease in cholesterol bioaccessibility. Coffee lipids also decrease cholesterol bioaccessibility, although the mechanism of action identified is the co-solubilization in the bile salt micelles. The effect of both polysaccharides and lipids showed to be additive, representing the overall effect observed in a typical espresso coffee. The effect of polysaccharides and lipids on cholesterol bioaccessibility should be accounted on the formulation of hypocholesterolemic food ingredients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Nutrition and Health Based on Coffee, Tea, and Cocoa)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Coffee Silverskin Extract: Nutritional Value, Safety and Effect on Key Biological Functions
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2693; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112693 - 07 Nov 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
This study aimed to complete the scientific basis for the validation of a coffee silverskin extract (CSE) as a novel food ingredient according to European legislation. Nutritional value, safety, effects on biochemical biomarkers and excretion of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in vivo [...] Read more.
This study aimed to complete the scientific basis for the validation of a coffee silverskin extract (CSE) as a novel food ingredient according to European legislation. Nutritional value, safety, effects on biochemical biomarkers and excretion of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in vivo of CSE were assessed. Proteins, amino acids, fat, fatty acids, fiber, simple sugars and micronutrients were analyzed. For the first time, toxicological and physiological effects were evaluated in vivo by a repeated-dose study in healthy Wistar rats. Hormone secretion, antioxidant (enzymatic and no-enzymatic) and anti-inflammatory biomarkers, and dietary fiber fermentability of CSE (analysis of SCFAs in feces) were studied in biological samples. This unique research confirms the feasibility of CSE as a human dietary supplement with several nutrition claims: “source of proteins (16%), potassium, magnesium, calcium and vitamin C, low in fat (0.44%) and high in fiber (22%)”. This is the first report demonstrating that its oral administration (1 g/kg) for 28 days is innocuous. Hormone secretion, antioxidant or anti-inflammatory biomarkers were not affected in heathy animals. Total SCFAs derived from CSE fiber fermentation were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in male treated rats compared to male control rats. All the new information pinpoints CSE as a natural, sustainable and safe food ingredient containing fermentable fiber able to produce SCFAs with beneficial effects on gut microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Nutrition and Health Based on Coffee, Tea, and Cocoa)
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