Due to scheduled maintenance work on our core network, there may be short service disruptions on this website between 16:00 and 16:30 CEST on September 25th.

Special Issue "Fermentation and Bioactive Metabolites 3.0"

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Metabolism, Physiology & Genetics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Annalisa Serio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, Teramo, Italy
Interests: milk; dairy; food analysis; food microbiology and technology; food preservation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Clemencia Chaves-López
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Via R. Balzarini 1, 64100 Teramo, Italy
Interests: fermented foods; antimicrobial compounds; microbial ecology; moulds
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microorganisms are known to produce secondary metabolites, being exploited as useful bioactive molecules. In addition, they are very diverse both phylogenetically and functionally, being able to carry out complex metabolic transformations. This metabolic versatility leads to a pool of biomolecules that are highly diverse in chemical structure and biological function, and which have potential applications in medicine and the pharmaceutical and food industry fields. In addition, several microorganisms have been exploited to obtain biologically active compounds like peptides, carbohydrates, polyphenols, carotenoids, phytosterols, and fatty acids, which offer health benefits like the prevention of diseases, utilizing different plant- and animal-derived products as substrates. In fact, nowadays, the use of fermented foods is considered a promising alternative to satisfy the growing consumer demands for healthy foods. To increase the production of biomolecules, many strategies, such as the use of specialized single-strain microbial origin cultures, co- cultures exhibiting high diversity allowing complementarity of functions that can modulate their physiology to produce new bioactive molecules, have been used. Accordingly, the design of bioreactor and bioprocesses are also being exploited. This Special Issue aims to publish technological developments (in the form of original research articles, short communications, reviews, mini-reviews, methods articles, perspectives, and opinions, that make a considerable and efficient contribution to the scientific community) used to investigate different aspects of the impact of fermentation on the production of bioactive metabolites. Topics that will be considered include the production of biomolecules in relation to foods, agriculture, industry, biotechnology, and public health.

This is the third version of topic “Fermentation and Bioactive Metabolites”, The success of the first two Editions can be found at:

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/fermentation/special_issues/bioactive_metabolites

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/fermentation/special_issues/bioactive_metabolites_2

Prof. Dr. Annalisa Serio
Prof. Dr. Clemencia Chaves-López
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Peptides
  • Fatty acids
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Organic volatile compounds
  • Antimicrobial compounds
  • Secondary metabolites.

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Citric Acid Influences the Dynamics of the Fermentation Quality, Protease Activity and Microbial Community of Mulberry Leaf Silage
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030185 - 09 Sep 2021
Viewed by 237
Abstract
Mulberry (Morus alba) leaves has performed well as a high-quality protein supplement for livestock and enriches the edible resources of livestock. However, the harvest of mulberry leaves is seasonal and occurs mainly during the rainy season in southeast China; therefore, humid [...] Read more.
Mulberry (Morus alba) leaves has performed well as a high-quality protein supplement for livestock and enriches the edible resources of livestock. However, the harvest of mulberry leaves is seasonal and occurs mainly during the rainy season in southeast China; therefore, humid and sultry weather causes serious losses of mulberry leaf biomass, which pose a challenge for the preservation of mulberry leaves. In this study, we used the silage fermentation method to preserve mulberry leaves and investigated the effects of citric acid on the silage quality of mulberry leaves. Mulberry leaves were ensiled with or without 1% citric acid and 2% citric acid. The chemical composition, protein fraction and microbial community of mulberry leaf silages were analyzed. The results showed that the silage treated with citric acid had a higher dry matter recovery and lactic acid content and a lower acetic acid content, non-protein nitrogen content and ammonia-N content; citric acid also inhibited the activities of carboxypeptidase and aminopeptidase. Moreover, citric acid increased Lactobacillus abundance in silages and decreased the abundance of undesired microorganisms, such as Enterobacter. In summary, the addition of citric acid improved the fermentation quality of mulberry leaf silages, with 2% citric acid being more effective than 1% citric acid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermentation and Bioactive Metabolites 3.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Immunomodulatory Effect of Sasa quelpaertensis Leaves Fermentation Products in Mice
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030142 - 03 Aug 2021
Viewed by 420
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to enhance the immune-enhancing activity of mushroom strains through fermentation to promote food use of leaf extracts of S. quelpaertensis containing β-glucan. We evaluated the immunomodulatory effect of extracts from fermented S. quelpaertensis leaves (SQGL, SQHE, SQPL). [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to enhance the immune-enhancing activity of mushroom strains through fermentation to promote food use of leaf extracts of S. quelpaertensis containing β-glucan. We evaluated the immunomodulatory effect of extracts from fermented S. quelpaertensis leaves (SQGL, SQHE, SQPL). S. quelpaertensis leaves fermentation products were prepared by using mushroom mycelia (Ganoderma lucidum, Hericium erinaceum, Phellinus linteus). The content of β-glucan, a major substance in S. quelpaertensis leaves fermentation products, was 3.73 ± 0.50 mg/mL in the extract (SQ) of S. quelpaertensis leaves. The fermented mushrooms, SQGL, were the highest at 5.57 ± 0.86 mg/100 mL, followed by SQHE and SQPL, and the β-glucan content of all of the glucan was >75.3%. To test the immune activity, S. quelpaertensis leaf fermentation products were administered to mice at different doses (60, 160, and 360 mg/kg) for two weeks. Th cell and macrophage populations were found to increase significantly at all three doses compared to the negative control after two weeks. SQGL and SQHE were highest at 160 mg/kg, and SQPL showed the highest Th cell proliferation at 60 mg/kg. In addition, the production of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and nitric oxide was significantly higher than that of the negative control after two weeks. In particular, an increase was seen at a low concentration of 60 mg/kg. Therefore, the S. quelpaertensis leaf fermentation product can be very useful as a functional ingredient for enhancing immunity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermentation and Bioactive Metabolites 3.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Ability of Yeast Metabolic Activity to Reduce Sugars and Stabilize Betalains in Red Beet Juice
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030105 - 05 Jul 2021
Viewed by 329
Abstract
To lower the risk of obesity, diabetes, and other related diseases, the WHO recommends that consumers reduce their consumption of sugars. Here, we propose a microbiological method to reduce the sugar content in red beet juice, while incurring only slight losses in the [...] Read more.
To lower the risk of obesity, diabetes, and other related diseases, the WHO recommends that consumers reduce their consumption of sugars. Here, we propose a microbiological method to reduce the sugar content in red beet juice, while incurring only slight losses in the betalain content and maintaining the correct proportion of the other beet juice components. Several yeast strains with different metabolic activities were investigated for their ability to reduce the sugar content in red beet juice, which resulted in a decrease in the extract level corresponding to sugar content from 49.7% to 58.2%. This strategy was found to have the additional advantage of increasing the chemical and microbial stability of the red beet juice. Only slight losses of betalain pigments were noted, to final concentrations of 5.11% w/v and 2.56% w/v for the red and yellow fractions, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermentation and Bioactive Metabolites 3.0)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Increased Extracellular Saponin Production after the Addition of Rutin in Truffle Liquid Fermentation and Its Antioxidant Activities
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030103 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 393
Abstract
Saponins possess a variety of pharmacological effects and exhibit great potential in the food industry as bioactive substances. In this study, extracellular saponin production via the liquid fermentation of Tuber melanosporum occurred with the addition of rutin. For this purpose, medium composition and [...] Read more.
Saponins possess a variety of pharmacological effects and exhibit great potential in the food industry as bioactive substances. In this study, extracellular saponin production via the liquid fermentation of Tuber melanosporum occurred with the addition of rutin. For this purpose, medium composition and culture conditions were optimized using single-factor experiments and an orthogonal experiment design. The optimal medium consisted of glucose (43.5 g/L), peptone (6 g/L), KH2PO4 (1.15 g/L), NaCl (0.2 g/L), vitamin B2 (0.082 g/L), vitamin B6 (0.1 g/L), vitamin C (0.02 g/L), and rutin (4.8 g/L). The culture conditions were as follows: 12.5% (v/v) inoculation, medium volume of 50 mL/250 mL flask, culture temperature of 24 °C, shaker speed of 190 rpm, initial pH of 5.7, and culture time of 96 h. Finally, a maximal extracellular saponin content of 0.413 g/L was obtained, which was 134.7% higher than that in the base medium. Rutin proved to be an excellent promoter, because the saponin production was increased by 50.2% compared to that in the optimized medium without rutin. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and ferric reducing antioxidant power of truffle saponins reached 94.13%, 79.26%, and 42.22 mM, respectively. This study provides a useful strategy for fungal bioactive saponin production by liquid fermentation with the addition of flavonoid compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermentation and Bioactive Metabolites 3.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Microbial Composition of Fermented Korean Soy Paste (Doenjang) Prepared by Adding Different Herbs during Fermentation
Fermentation 2021, 7(2), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7020093 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 664
Abstract
The microbiota involved in Korean soy paste (doenjang) fermentation are the key factors determining its quality aspects. In this study, doenjang was prepared by adding three different herbs (Peppermint, Korean mint, and Coriander), and their effect on the microbiota composition was evaluated by [...] Read more.
The microbiota involved in Korean soy paste (doenjang) fermentation are the key factors determining its quality aspects. In this study, doenjang was prepared by adding three different herbs (Peppermint, Korean mint, and Coriander), and their effect on the microbiota composition was evaluated by 16S rRNA metagenomic analyses. The β-diversity statistics indicated clear distinctions in the doenjang microbiota after the addition of herbs. A microbial composition analysis revealed that Tetragenococcus was among the dominant genera in the four doenjang groups, with a relatively higher abundance in the Korean mint group. In the Peppermint and Korean mint doenjang groups, the levels of undesirable microbes, such as opportunistic pathogens belonging to the genera Sphingobacterium and Pantoea, were significantly reduced. Additionally, other desirable microbes that are known to exhibit beneficial properties and produce bioactive compounds, such as Saccharopolyspora and Buttiauxella, were present at significantly higher levels. Significant negative correlations between members of the Bacillaceae and Halomonadaceae, Lactobacillaceae and Tissierellaceae, and the Lacobacillaceae and Erwiniaceae families were observed, indicating possible antagonistic relationships. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the incorporation of herbs, particularly Peppermint and Korean mint, during doenjang fermentation resulted in significant shifts in the microbial composition and could be utilized for beneficial effect on its fermentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermentation and Bioactive Metabolites 3.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Obtaining Antioxidants and Natural Preservatives from Food By-Products through Fermentation: A Review
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030106 - 07 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 910
Abstract
Industrial food waste has potential for generating income from high-added-value compounds through fermentation. Solid-state fermentation is promising to obtain a high yield of bioactive compounds while requiring less water for the microorganism’s growth. A number of scientific studies evinced an increase in flavonoids [...] Read more.
Industrial food waste has potential for generating income from high-added-value compounds through fermentation. Solid-state fermentation is promising to obtain a high yield of bioactive compounds while requiring less water for the microorganism’s growth. A number of scientific studies evinced an increase in flavonoids or phenolics from fruit or vegetable waste and bioactive peptides from cereal processing residues and whey, a major waste of the dairy industry. Livestock, fish, or shellfish processing by-products (skin, viscera, fish scales, seabass colon, shrimp waste) also has the possibility of generating antioxidant peptides, hydrolysates, or compounds through fermentation. These bioactive compounds (phenolics, flavonoids, or antioxidant peptides) resulting from bacterial or fungal fermentation are also capable of inhibiting the growth of commonly occurring food spoilage fungi and can be used as natural preservatives. Despite the significant release or enhancement of antioxidant compounds through by-products fermentation, the surface areas of large-scale bioreactors and flow patterns act as constraints in designing a scale-up process for improved efficiency. An in-process purification method can also be the most significant contributing factor for raising the overall cost. Therefore, future research in modelling scale-up design can contribute towards mitigating the discard of high-added-value generating residues. Therefore, in this review, the current knowledge on the use of fermentation to obtain bioactive compounds from food by-products, emphasizing their use as natural preservatives, was evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermentation and Bioactive Metabolites 3.0)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop