Special Issue "Volume II: Energy Resource Potential of Gas Hydrates"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Federico Rossi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Engineering Department, University of Perugia, Via G.Duranti 67, 06125 Perugia, Italy
Interests: Thermal sciences; energy technology; building physics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Beatrice Castellani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, CIRIAF, University of Perugia, Via G.Duranti 67, 06125 Perugia, Italy
Interests: energy storage and energy systems; natural gas hydrates; clathrate hydrates; CO2 capture; energy efficiency; waste management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are glad to share the great success of our Special Issue “Energy Resource Potential of Gas Hydrates”.

We now seek to launch the second volume of this Special Issue “Energy Resource Potential of Gas Hydrates”.

Natural gas hydrates, mostly located on the seabed, constitute the largest reservoir of natural gas on the planet, and represent an important solution for the transition from the current energy scenario to a renewable one.

Methane, contained in hydrates’ crystalline structure, can be replaced by carbon dioxide, meaning that the obtained fuel is neutral in terms of climate-changing emissions and is therefore equivalent to renewable energy sources.

Authors are invited to submit papers in the field of gas hydrates as an energy resource, focusing on the following topics:

  • Chemical and physical aspects for a deeper comprehension of the kinetics and thermodynamics of methane delivery and CO2 hydrate formation and stability
  • Geological aspects, in particular the mechanical properties of CO2 and CH4 hydrate sediments, as well as the mechanical properties of gas hydrates during the CH4–CO2 exchange process; prospection and detection aspects.
  • Engineering aspects related to natural gas extraction, the CO2 injection and replacement process, and drilling problems.
  • Environmental sustainability evaluations.
  • Economic and political aspects of gas hydrate exploitation; effects on energy scenarios and markets.

Dr. Federico Rossi
Dr. Beatrice Castellani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gas hydrate
  • natural gas
  • methane
  • production and reservoirs
  • sustainability
  • energy resource
  • CO2 replacement
  • environmental impact
  • economic analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Development of AI-Based Diagnostic Model for the Prediction of Hydrate in Gas Pipeline
Energies 2021, 14(8), 2313; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14082313 - 20 Apr 2021
Viewed by 377
Abstract
For the stable supply of oil and gas resources, industry is pushing for various attempts and technology development to produce not only existing land fields but also deep-sea, where production is difficult. The development of flow assurance technology is necessary because hydrate is [...] Read more.
For the stable supply of oil and gas resources, industry is pushing for various attempts and technology development to produce not only existing land fields but also deep-sea, where production is difficult. The development of flow assurance technology is necessary because hydrate is aggregated in the pipeline and prevent stable production. This study established a system that enables hydrate diagnosis in the gas pipeline from a flow assurance perspective. Learning data were generated using an OLGA simulator, and temperature, pressure, and hydrate volume at each time step were generated. Stacked auto-encoder (SAE) was used as the AI model after analyzing training loss. Hyper-parameter matching and structure optimization were carried out using the greedy layer-wise technique. Through time-series forecast, we determined that AI diagnostic model enables depiction of the growth of hydrate volume. In addition, the average R-square for the maximum hydrate volume was 97%, and that for the formation location was calculated as 99%. This study confirmed that machine learning could be applied to the flow assurance area of gas pipelines and it can predict hydrate formation in real time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volume II: Energy Resource Potential of Gas Hydrates)
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Article
Observation of the Main Natural Parameters Influencing the Formation of Gas Hydrates
Energies 2021, 14(7), 1803; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14071803 - 24 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 556
Abstract
Chemical composition in seawater of marine sediments, as well as the physical properties and chemical composition of soils, influence the phase behavior of natural gas hydrate by disturbing the hydrogen bond network in the water-rich phase before hydrate formation. In this article, some [...] Read more.
Chemical composition in seawater of marine sediments, as well as the physical properties and chemical composition of soils, influence the phase behavior of natural gas hydrate by disturbing the hydrogen bond network in the water-rich phase before hydrate formation. In this article, some marine sediments samples, collected in National Antarctic Museum in Trieste, were analyzed and properties such as pH, conductivity, salinity, and concentration of main elements of water present in the sediments are reported. The results, obtained by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC) analysis, show that the more abundant cation is sodium and, present in smaller quantities, but not negligible, are calcium, potassium, and magnesium, while the more abundant anion is chloride and sulfate is also appreciable. These results were successively used to determine the thermodynamic parameters and the effect on salinity of water on hydrates’ formation. Then, hydrate formation was experimentally tested using a small-scale apparatus, in the presence of two different porous media: a pure silica sand and a silica-based natural sand, coming from the Mediterranean seafloor. The results proved how the presence of further compounds, rather than silicon, as well as the heterogeneous grainsize and porosity, made this sand a weak thermodynamic and a strong kinetic inhibitor for the hydrate formation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Volume II: Energy Resource Potential of Gas Hydrates)
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