Special Issue "Flexibility in Distribution Systems from EVs and Batteries"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart Grids and Microgrids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Roberto Villafafila-Robles
Website
Guest Editor
CITCEA-UPC, Department of Electrical Engineering (DEE), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: integration of renewable energy - storage - electric vehicles into power systems; electricity markets; energy and territory
Prof. Dr. Andreas Sumper
Website
Guest Editor
CITCEA-UPC, Department of Electrical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: electrical engineering, energy efficiency, power grid, renewable energy, smart grid, digital energy, electricity markets, electric cars charging
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Distribution systems have been typically designed and managed just for delivering energy, because balancing generation and demand was typically provided at the transmission level by centralized and dispatchable power plants. However, both the increasing connection of distributed generation-based renewable sources at the distribution level and the empowerment of consumers are transforming how power systems should be designed and managed, because these large numbers of generators are variable and intermittent, and the demand is becoming more active and engaged. Moreover, consumers are including new loads such as electric vehicles (EVs) and stationary batteries, and their control opens an opportunity for flexibility of generation and demand at the distribution level because they can be used to enhance energy and power-related operations for the benefit of grid owners, system operators, buildings and households, and market agents as retailers/aggregators/balance responsible parties. The effective deployment of this flexibility in distribution systems depends on optimization schemes, as each case will have its own requirements and characteristics; specific markets and business models, as different markets can be considered for flexibility usage in order to bring value to the whole set of participants; and proper regulation framework, as there is a lack of standardization on codes and laws that limits the deployment of flexible management. This Special Issue on “Flexibility in Distribution Systems from EVs and Batteries” is intended to bring together key and inspiring research on the flexibility concept, the services and the sources it can include, the market mechanism, and their results in different scenarios. Energy management optimization strategies for different beneficiaries considering use cases with electric vehicles (including V2G/V2H options) and/or batteries are welcome. The business models, their cost–benefit feasibility and sustainability analysis (at economic, environmental, and social dimensions), and current developments of flexibility sources (EVs, batteries, flexibility platform, etc.) will also be of interest.

Dr. Roberto Villafafila-Robles
Prof. Dr. Andreas Sumper
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • flexibility
  • energy management
  • electric vehicle
  • vehicle-to-grid (V2G)
  • vehicle-to-home (V2H)
  • batteries
  • storage system
  • prosumer
  • aggregator
  • distributed generation
  • electricity markets
  • smart grid

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Large Scale Smart Charging of Electric Vehicles in Practice
Energies 2020, 13(2), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13020298 - 07 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The energy system is changing due to a steady increase in electric vehicles on the demand side and local production (mostly through solar panels) on the production side. Both developments can put the energy grid under stress during certain timeframes, while there might [...] Read more.
The energy system is changing due to a steady increase in electric vehicles on the demand side and local production (mostly through solar panels) on the production side. Both developments can put the energy grid under stress during certain timeframes, while there might be enough capacity on the grid most of the day. Smart charging of electric vehicles might be a solution to time dependent congestion. In this study, a smart charging strategy was developed and tested in large scale with 1000 public chargers, operated in the real word. We developed and tested protocols to temporarily limit the charger capacity based on the transformer data and the number of running sessions. Over 150,000 sessions were handled, of which almost half were influenced by the smart charging strategy applied. We found that we were able to keep within the grid limits by using these controls, without hindering the driver experience. Further improvements to the smart charging strategy can be made as soon as car manufacturers share information about the car battery such as the state of charge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexibility in Distribution Systems from EVs and Batteries)
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Open AccessArticle
The Potential Role of Flexibility During Peak Hours on Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Life Cycle Assessment of Five Targeted National Electricity Grid Mixes
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4443; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234443 - 22 Nov 2019
Abstract
On the path towards the decarbonization of the electricity supply, flexibility and demand response have become key factors to enhance the integration of distributed energy resources, shifting the consumption from peak hours to off-peak hours, optimizing the grid usage and maximizing the share [...] Read more.
On the path towards the decarbonization of the electricity supply, flexibility and demand response have become key factors to enhance the integration of distributed energy resources, shifting the consumption from peak hours to off-peak hours, optimizing the grid usage and maximizing the share of renewables. Despite the technical viability of flexible services, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions has not been proven. Traditionally, emissions are calculated on a yearly average timescale, not providing any information about peak hours’ environmental impact. Furthermore, peak-hours’ environmental impacts are not always greater than on the base load, depending on the resources used for those time periods. This paper formulates a general methodology to assess the potential environmental impact of peak-hourly generation profiles, through attributional life cycle assessment. This methodology was applied to five different countries under the INVADE H2020 Project. Evaluation results demonstrate that countries like Spain and Bulgaria could benefit from implementing demand response activities considering environmental aspects, enhancing potential greenhouse gas reductions by up to 21% in peak hours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexibility in Distribution Systems from EVs and Batteries)
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