Special Issue "Advanced Materials/Devices for Power Electronics"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Hervé Morel
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Univ Lyon, Laboratoire Ampère, CNRS, INSA Lyon, France
Interests: power electronics; power semiconductor device; electrical characterization of power devices and power converters; CAE of power electronic system integration; multi-physics modeling; bond graph

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The integration of renewable energies in traditional AC or DC electricity grids (HVDC, MVDC, LVDC) and the need for better energy efficiency have led to the increased electrification of our energy consumption. This requires more and more power converters with high performance (efficiency, compactness, reliability and ability to withstand harsh environments). To achieve these goals, more powerful power devices and materials with sharp features are needed. Power electronics has seen the arrival of new devices that perform better on silicon (trench, super-junctions, etc.) or based on materials with a wide band gap (SiC, GaN, Diamond), new structural variants (MOSFET, JFET, BJT, Schottky diodes, thyristor, HEMT and their combinations) with very sophisticated multiphysics analysis and design needs (close control, EMC disturbances, multiphysics optimizations).

The performance of these new devices also requires high-performance materials (electrical and thermal conductors, insulators, magnetic dielectrics) for the realization of passive components (capacitors and inductors, etc.) or the integration of chips into power integrated circuits or hybrid module performance and reliable power (packaging, encapsulation, ability to withstand harsh environments).

Prospective authors are invited to submit original contributions, survey papers or tutorials for review and potential publication in this Special Issue. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • New power devices (Si, SiC, GaN, Diamond, etc.) for advanced operation.
  • Characterization and modeling of new power devices.
  • Power devices in their environment (gate drive, packaging, thermal management, etc.).
  • New materials (conductor, thermal management, insulator, dielectric, magnetic, etc.) for advanced power electronics.
  • Material modeling and characterization for advanced power electronics.

Dr. Hervé Morel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • power semiconductor devices
  • wide band gap
  • power device modeling and characterization
  • material for advance power electronics
  • energy efficiency, compactness and reliability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
10 kV Silicon Carbide PiN Diodes—From Design to Packaged Component Characterization
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4566; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234566 - 29 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization results obtained on the last generation (third run) of SiC 10 kV PiN diodes from SuperGrid Institute. In forward bias, the 59 mm2 diodes were tested up to 100 A. These devices withstand voltages [...] Read more.
This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization results obtained on the last generation (third run) of SiC 10 kV PiN diodes from SuperGrid Institute. In forward bias, the 59 mm2 diodes were tested up to 100 A. These devices withstand voltages up to 12 kV on wafer (before dicing, packaging) and show a low forward voltage drop at 80 A. The influence of the temperature from 25 °C to 125 °C has been assessed and shows that resistivity modulation occurs in the whole temperature range. Leakage current at 3 kV increases with temperature, while being three orders of magnitude lower than those of equivalent Si diodes. Double-pulse switching tests reveal the 10 kV SiC PiN diode’s outstanding performance. Turn-on dV/dt and di/dt are −32 V/ns and 311 A/µs, respectively, whereas turn-off dV/dt and di/dt are 474 V/ns and −4.2 A/ns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials/Devices for Power Electronics)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Impact of Wide-Bandgap Technology on Renewable Energy and Smart-Grid Power Conversion Applications Including Storage
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4462; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234462 - 22 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Wide-bandgap (WBG) semiconductor devices are making their way into large-volume applications, including pivotal domains of societal infrastructure such as sustainable energy generation and conversion. Presented for a long time mainly as a synonym of high-temperature electronics, hands-on experience has highlighted a number of [...] Read more.
Wide-bandgap (WBG) semiconductor devices are making their way into large-volume applications, including pivotal domains of societal infrastructure such as sustainable energy generation and conversion. Presented for a long time mainly as a synonym of high-temperature electronics, hands-on experience has highlighted a number of gains that can be drawn from this technology even when used as a straightforward drop-in substitute of silicon in established applications and field-proven designs. Incremental in nature, these gains enable interesting progress beyond state-of-the-art forms, which, though not corresponding to the full exploitation of the potential of this technology, are oftentimes sufficient to justify its adoption. With particular reference to renewable energy power conversion and solid-state transformation, in the context of transport applications and incorporating a storage device, this paper reports on the understanding generated over the past few years and points out some specifically tailored technology and circuit design requirements to ensure overall beneficial impact of the adoption of WBG technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials/Devices for Power Electronics)
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