Special Issue "Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2020).

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Nina S. Roberts
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Recreation, Parks, & Tourism, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Ave, HSS 307, San Francisco, CA 94132, USA
Interests: outdoor programming and leadership; adventure education; youth development; outreach and community engagement; constraints and barriers to visiting parks and public lands; an authority on race; culture and gender issues in parks/protected areas and outdoor recreation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the field of outdoor recreation and adventure education continues to grow and expand, the need to keep up with trends and innovative practices is ubiquitous. In 2020, Education Sciences will be producing a Special Issue on outdoor adventure. Education Sciences is a peer reviewed, scholarly open access journal managed by MDPI (e.g., open scientific exchange in all forms, across all disciplines). Over 200 MDPI journals are supported by more than 35,000 academic editors. Scholars from around the world benefit from the latest research, freely available, distributed under proper license, and strict ethnical policies enforcing rigorous peer-review standards serving the scientific community for 23 years.

As explicitly stated, MDPI maintains the following three conditions: (1) peer-reviewed literature is freely available without subscription or price barriers; (2) literature is immediately released in open access format, and (3) published material can be re-used without obtaining permission as long as a correct citation to the original publication is given (i.e., https://bit.ly/2WfF3E9)

The overall focus, scope, and purpose of this Special Issue on outdoor adventure is to provide the current and anticipated future trends; offer innovative ideas for new programs; support decision making for managers to move plans and intentions into action; inspire pioneering staff training and leadership development; incite policy reviews and revisions; promote resource (re)allocation where needed; and stimulate culture shifts among outdoor leaders and managers.

Furthermore, this Special Issue will be situated within the existing literature by depicting major trends in the field, exploring organizational issues and successes, identifying gaps between research and practice, and formulating solutions to some of the fields’ most pressing challenges. Of particular interest are manuscripts reporting:

• Adventure education across diverse cultures
• Innovative partnerships for experiential education outdoors
• Land management agencies working with adventure education programs
• Leadership and/or management issues and challenges
• Programming advances, participation trends
• Recruitment and retention of diverse staff; workforce enhancement
• Social groups/identity and outdoor spaces (e.g., people of color and outdoor adventure; women in the outdoors—where have we been, where are we going?; LGBTQ trends and future directions; youth and outdoor adventure)
• Socioeconomic factors and solutions
• Technology influences and adventure education
• Working with schools/school districts and being in sync with curriculum needs, supporting transportation challenges, etc.

If more than five manuscripts are of exceptional value and quality, there is a possibility this Special Issue could be considered as an edited book.

Sample References:

  1. Adventure Travel Trade Association (2018). 20 adventure travel trends to watch in 2018.  ATTA Research report, 45pp.  Available: https://bit.ly/32PT0uF
  2. Attarian, A. (2001). Trends in outdoor adventure education. Journal of Experiential Education, 24(3), 141-149. 
  3. Bobilya, A.J., Holman, T., Lindley, B. & McAvoy, L.H. (2010).  Developing Trends and Issues in U.S Outdoor and Adventure-Based Programming. Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership, 2(3), 301-321.
  4. Ewert, A.W. & Sibthorp, J. (2014).  Outdoor adventure education: Foundations, theory, and research. Champaign, IL:  Human Kinetics.
  5. Gray, T. & Mitten, D. (Eds.) (2018).  The Palgrave International Handbook of Women and Outdoor Learning. London:Springer Nature/Palgrave Macmillian. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-53550-0
  6. Mcphie, J. (2014).  Controversial issues in adventure programming. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 14(3), 262-264. https://doi.org/10.1080/14729679.2013.870820
  7. Miles, J.C. & Priest, S. (Eds) (1999). Adventure programming. State College, PA: Venture. (ERIC Number: ED444811).

Dr. Nina S. Roberts
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • outdoor education leadership
  • program innovations
  • participation trends
  • technology
  • public–private partnerships
  • recruitment and retention
  • justice, equity, diversity and inclusion
  • economics
  • risk management
  • evaluation
  • health benefits

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Editorial
Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions—Introduction to a Special Collection of Research
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11010007 - 30 Dec 2020
Viewed by 1076
Abstract
This special issue on “outdoor adventure education” contains seven articles focused on varied topics in outdoor adventure education (OAE) from the impact of COVID-19, creating a mobile App and girls outdoors to urban programming, systems of privilege and more [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Italian Nature-Based Programs in the Educational, Therapeutic, Training and Leisure Areas
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(12), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10120394 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1336
Abstract
In these times of global crisis caused by COVID-19, there is an urgent need to address the topic of nature-based experiences in education: the pandemic has strongly highlighted both the interdependence between human beings and nature, and the need for mending the dichotomic [...] Read more.
In these times of global crisis caused by COVID-19, there is an urgent need to address the topic of nature-based experiences in education: the pandemic has strongly highlighted both the interdependence between human beings and nature, and the need for mending the dichotomic vision that keeps them separate. Experiential education in natural contexts within an ecological framework might have a strategic role in this crucial period to develop anthropologic, civic, and dialogic conscience (Morin, 2001). Through this study, CEFEO Research Center had the objective of investigating the socio-economic impact of COVID-19 on Italian nature-based programs in the educational, therapeutic, training, and leisure areas. From 28 May to 19 June 2020, an online questionnaire was distributed with the purpose of understanding the socio-economic impact of the pandemic on nature-based programs during the lockdown period and during the period of first reopening, and the related needs and new opportunities for the future. The results highlight a paradox: the COVID-19 crisis has caused more problems for a sector which was already suffering from a lack of funding and of social and institutional acknowledgment. Many agencies working in the field lost months of income and numerous working days, and they are uncertain about the future: they are having difficulties surviving in a moment when we need them more. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)
Article
The Development of an Educational Outdoor Adventure Mobile App
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(12), 382; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10120382 - 16 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 898
Abstract
This article focuses on the development of an educational outdoor adventure mobile app while presenting findings that were derived from various case studies that we conducted using it. The mobile application, called RouteQuizer, is complemented by a web application and a database, forming [...] Read more.
This article focuses on the development of an educational outdoor adventure mobile app while presenting findings that were derived from various case studies that we conducted using it. The mobile application, called RouteQuizer, is complemented by a web application and a database, forming a system that enables teachers to create educational treasure hunt activities for their students and monitor their performance. The aim of the research was to create a system that would exploit all possible Outdoor Adventure Education (OAE) and treasure hunt benefits while excluding possible smartphone use negative consequences. The development of the system took place in Greece and began in December 2017, by conducting a nation-wide research examining Greek secondary teachers’ Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literacy and perceptions on smartphone use and outdoor activities. By June 2018, 700 questionnaires were collected. In order to test the system, in March 2018, we conducted a pilot case study in Lesvos island Greece and between July 2018 and February 2020, we conducted four additional case studies and a teacher training program, all of which took place in Lesvos island Greece. During the development process of the mobile application, we focused on the participatory aspect of the process, paying special attention to the teacher and student evaluation during the design and prototyping phases. Considering that the system is educational we research whether the mobile application provided effective learning outcomes and whether it benefited students’ social and physical skills. The results that we collected suggest that the mobile application is an effective learning tool while mobile learning and treasure hunt benefits have been repeatedly confirmed during the case studies. Greek teachers and students also proved to be capable smartphone and computer users, and reported being willing to participate in similar activities in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Communication
The Case for Evidence-Based Outdoor Recreation Interventions for Girls: Helping Girls “Find Their Voice” in the Outdoors
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(12), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10120363 - 29 Nov 2020
Viewed by 1024
Abstract
Females’ participation in outdoor recreation is often limited for a variety of reasons including social gender norms, a lack of exposure, and fear. Research has uncovered a wide range of positive outcomes for those females who do participate ranging from enhanced self-esteem and [...] Read more.
Females’ participation in outdoor recreation is often limited for a variety of reasons including social gender norms, a lack of exposure, and fear. Research has uncovered a wide range of positive outcomes for those females who do participate ranging from enhanced self-esteem and confidence to improved body image, indicating the importance of opening the outdoors as a welcoming place for all to experience. Finding Your Voice is a recreation intervention created with the focus of introducing middle school girls to outdoor recreation to increase the participants’ self-efficacy and self-empowerment. Empirical research focusing on participant experiences has demonstrated promising results and the best practices from Finding Your Voice and the broader research on female empowerment in the outdoors are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)
Article
Gateway to Outdoors: Partnership and Programming of Outdoor Education Centers in Urban Areas
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10110340 - 19 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 891
Abstract
The purpose of the study is to understand the challenges and opportunities of urban outdoor education centers in partnership and programming. The context for this study involves efforts by all-season outdoor education centers, Outdoor Campus (OC), in two urban areas in South Dakota [...] Read more.
The purpose of the study is to understand the challenges and opportunities of urban outdoor education centers in partnership and programming. The context for this study involves efforts by all-season outdoor education centers, Outdoor Campus (OC), in two urban areas in South Dakota (SD). Outdoor education scope and social-ecological framework were applied to guide this qualitative study. Semi-structured interview questions were used to interview eight outdoor educators in 2019, including four individuals from each service location composed of three males and five female educators. Qualitative content analysis was applied to identify common themes and essential quotations that emerged from the data analyzed through the interviews. Three main themes emerged: (1) gateway to our outdoor legacy (2) working together for outdoor education, including three sub-themes: formal partnership, programmatic partnership, and finding balance in partnership, (3) challenges as opportunities in outdoor education programs, including two sub-themes: common challenges and evolving process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Unpacking Systems of Privilege: The Opportunity of Critical Reflection in Outdoor Adventure Education
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 318; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10110318 - 04 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 989
Abstract
Outdoor adventure education has an extensive history of considering how its students should wrestle with privilege. Recent events have brought issues of privilege to the forefront, which raises the question of whether outdoor adventure education can play a role in learning to see [...] Read more.
Outdoor adventure education has an extensive history of considering how its students should wrestle with privilege. Recent events have brought issues of privilege to the forefront, which raises the question of whether outdoor adventure education can play a role in learning to see and affect systems of privilege. This paper examines several elements of outdoor adventure education that make it an ideal environment for teaching about systems of privilege, and makes the argument that Jack Mezirow’s critical reflection, wherein people question the principles that underlie their ideas, should be a key element of outdoor adventure education curriculum in the 21st century. The authors’ perspectives are grounded in critical theory and the assumption that power dynamics need to be examined in order to be changed. By combining critical reflection with the unique characteristics of outdoor adventure education, outdoor adventure educators may be able to successfully teach participants to recognize and impact systems that operate around them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)
Article
Where Are We Going? International Views on Purposes, Practices and Barriers in School-Based Outdoor Learning
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10110311 - 30 Oct 2020
Viewed by 2585
Abstract
Popular demand for school-based outdoor learning is growing throughout the world, but there is relatively little use of international comparisons to inform the development and support of this growth. Motivations for providing outdoor learning may vary within and across countries/areas. Through understanding how [...] Read more.
Popular demand for school-based outdoor learning is growing throughout the world, but there is relatively little use of international comparisons to inform the development and support of this growth. Motivations for providing outdoor learning may vary within and across countries/areas. Through understanding how different purposes are being approached internationally, we can learn how outdoor learning might best be supported to achieve particular outcomes. Eighty expert commentators on outdoor learning from 19 countries/areas responded to a short online survey about motivations for and practices in school-based outdoor learning, based on their experience working in this field. The survey was designed using a conceptual framework of student outcomes from outdoor learning, derived from policy analysis and five major reviews of the field. The three most frequently reported forms of outdoor learning practiced in schools were field studies, early years outdoor activities, and outdoor and adventure education. Among identified purposes for outdoor learning provision within schooling, supporting environmental awareness and action and pupil health and well-being were the most common. Some alignment of forms of outdoor learning and specific outcomes are discussed and implications for future policy, practice, and research considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Exploring the Inclusive Praxis of Outward Bound Instructors
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10090241 - 10 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1117
Abstract
Equity and inclusion are critical issues that need to be addressed in outdoor adventure education. Although some literature identifies inclusive practices for enhancing equity in outdoor adventure education, most research does not situate these practices within the contexts in which they were created [...] Read more.
Equity and inclusion are critical issues that need to be addressed in outdoor adventure education. Although some literature identifies inclusive practices for enhancing equity in outdoor adventure education, most research does not situate these practices within the contexts in which they were created and used. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore outdoor adventure education instructors’ inclusive praxis, and the conditions that influenced their praxis on their courses and in their instructing experiences. To this end, we conducted semi-structured interviews with ten instructors from four Outward Bound schools in the USA. The instructors varied in their gender, school, types of programs facilitated, and duration of employment with Outward Bound. Our inductive analysis of the interview data focused on the identification of themes illustrating the characteristics of instructors’ inclusive praxis, as well as the conditions that influenced their praxis. Themes emerged from our analysis that highlighted the macro and micro conditions that set the stage for instructors’ inclusive praxis, which focused on creating spaces that fostered inclusive group cultures on their courses. The findings from this study may be a useful starting point for enhancing the instructors’ role in fostering equity and inclusion on outdoor adventure education courses. We conclude with suggestions for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Outdoor Adventure Education: Trends and New Directions)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop