Special Issue "Interdisciplinary STEM Teaching and Learning in Schools"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "STEM Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 1324

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Lihua Xu
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Arts and Education, School of Education, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
Interests: interdisciplinary STEM; student reasoning; classroom research; teacher professional learning
Prof. Dr. Su-Chi Fang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate Institute of Science Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116059, Taiwan
Interests: STEM education; inquiry-based teaching; international comparison in science education
Prof. Dr. Wanty Widjaja
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Arts and Education, School of Education, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia
Interests: interdisciplinary STEM; lesson study; mathematical modelling; teacher professional learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In a rapidly changing and increasingly complex world facing significant challenges, such as climate change, traditional approaches to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) are becoming insufficient to develop learner knowledge, skills and dispositions for the future. An appreciation and understanding of the world as a series of interlocked complex systems is critical, both for individuals and communities (English, 2008). Teaching STEM in a more connected manner, especially in the context of real-world issues, can make STEM subjects more relevant to teachers and students (Honey et al., 2014), enhance student learning and engagement in disciplinary knowledge (Czerniak & Johnson, 2014), and facilitate their development of 21st century skills (Li, Schoenfeld, Graesser, Benson, English & Duschl, 2019).

Interdisciplinary approaches to teaching and learning in STEM have been increasingly advocated as alternatives to traditional approaches, whereby students learn concepts and skills from two or more disciplines that are tightly linked to enhance student knowledge in each of these areas (Vasquez, Sneider, and Corner, 2013). However, empirical studies that demonstrate the benefits and challenges of such approaches are still emerging. Furthermore, examples of interdisciplinary curriculum and task designs, classroom practices, and assessments are urgently needed to provide guidance for researchers and teachers to bring this agenda to fruition. In this Special Issue, we welcome submissions of both conceptual and empirical research papers that shed light on the discussion of interdisciplinary approaches to STEM in schools.

We welcome submissions addressing topics including, but not limited to:

  • Design of curriculum and tasks to enable student learning across disciplinary boundaries in STEM;
  • Assessment of interdisciplinary learning;
  • Teacher practices with interdisciplinary approaches;
  • Theoretical and conceptual frameworks on how interdisciplinary learning can be facilitated;
  • Innovative pedagogy for interdisciplinary STEM learning;
  • STEM policy and curriculum to support interdisciplinary learning in schools;
  • Teacher preparation for interdisciplinary STEM teaching;
  • Learning environment that enables student interdisciplinary STEM learning.

Dr. Lihua Xu
Prof. Dr. Su-Chi Fang
Prof. Dr. Wanty Widjaja
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • STEM teaching and learning
  • interdisciplinarity
  • pedagogy
  • curriculum and assessment
  • policy
  • learning environment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
STEM 1, 2, 3: Levelling Up in Primary Schools
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12110827 - 17 Nov 2022
Viewed by 249
Abstract
Recent research advocating the educational value of engaging primary students in authentic integrated STEM inquiry projects also identifies challenges for teachers aspiring to high-quality student-learning experiences. Teachers require support to integrate disciplines, prioritise processes and reasoning over curriculum content, and increase student autonomy [...] Read more.
Recent research advocating the educational value of engaging primary students in authentic integrated STEM inquiry projects also identifies challenges for teachers aspiring to high-quality student-learning experiences. Teachers require support to integrate disciplines, prioritise processes and reasoning over curriculum content, and increase student autonomy in purposeful STEM projects. Within the context of a year-long professional learning program in Australia, an innovative tri-level approach to skill-building for teachers and their students has been developed. The three levels of ‘STEM Skills’, ‘Design Process’ and ‘Integrated STEM Projects’ are intended to successively escalate demands on time, resources and pedagogical change while promoting the development of the dispositions and skills needed to engage in sustained inquiry projects. The teacher participants (n = 11) came from five schools who had just concluded the STEM Academy professional learning program. Semi-structured interviews guided teacher reflection. Data analysis combined inductive and deductive processes to thematize meaning and revealed ways in which the tri-level approach to STEM education supported the development of STEM integration practices. The findings suggest the efficacy of the tri-level approach and its potential value beyond the context in which it was developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interdisciplinary STEM Teaching and Learning in Schools)
Article
Reality vs. Expectations of Assessment in STEM Education: An Exploratory Case Study of STEM Schools in Egypt
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 762; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12110762 - 28 Oct 2022
Viewed by 362
Abstract
In this exploratory case study, the assessment methods planned and used in Egyptian STEM schools were explored. The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between the ideals provided in STEM education both from research and policy documents and the actual [...] Read more.
In this exploratory case study, the assessment methods planned and used in Egyptian STEM schools were explored. The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between the ideals provided in STEM education both from research and policy documents and the actual assessment strategies used both at the classroom and state level in order to understand the alignment between the proposed lofty goals of STEM and the modes of assessment actually used. Teachers in Egyptian STEM schools were surveyed and interviewed to explore this relationship. Samples of their assessments were also examined. Teachers were found to have been using two mutually exclusive models of assessment; a set of assessments at the disciplinary level and another set at multidisciplinary level including, but not restricted to, project and problem learning, inquiry, and reflective journaling. The study revealed partial alignment between expectations and reality of assessment in Egyptian STEM schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interdisciplinary STEM Teaching and Learning in Schools)
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