Special Issue "Mathematics Education and Implications to Educational Psychology"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Liudmila Liutsko
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
IS Global Instuto de Salud Global
Interests: Psychology, Education and Ethics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal Education Sciences is launching a Special Issue on “Mathematics Education and implications for Educational Psychology”. This call is for papers with theoretical, methodological, and analytical backgrounds, successful case studies, reviews, as well as original research studies based on the role of mathematics education and learning, knowledge, and skills in educational psychology.

We welcome submissions which cover a variety of issues about mathematics education and mathematical skills, also related to possible gender and sex individual differences, their link with or possible positive contributions to future professional competencies, and their relationship with executive functions, spatial abilities, motor control, emotions, creativity, quality of life, and well-being in general. Any other innovative topic within the scope of this Special Issue is also welcome and will be considered.

Some references and bibliography related to the topic:

Schneider, W. (2008). The development of metacognitive knowledge in children and adolescents: Major trends and implications for education. Mind, Brain, and Education2(3), 114-121.

Mix, K. S., & Cheng, Y. L. (2012). The relation between space and math: Developmental and educational implications. In Advances in child development and behavior (Vol. 42, pp. 197-243). JAI.

Pekrun, R., & Linnenbrink-Garcia, L. (2014). Introduction to emotions in education. In International handbook of emotions in education (pp. 11-20). Routledge.

Cheng, Y. L., & Mix, K. S. (2014). Spatial training improves children's mathematics ability. Journal of Cognition and Development15(1), 2-11.

Lowrie, T., Logan, T., & Ramful, A. (2017). Visuospatial training improves elementary students’ mathematics performance. British Journal of Educational Psychology87(2), 170-186.

Fischer, U., Moeller, K., Bientzle, M., Cress, U., & Nuerk, H. C. (2011). Sensori-motor spatial training of number magnitude representation. Psychonomic bulletin & review18(1), 177-183.

Uttal, D. H., Miller, D. I., & Newcombe, N. S. (2013). Exploring and enhancing spatial thinking: Links to achievement in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics?. Current Directions in Psychological Science22(5), 367-373.

Frick, A. (2019). Spatial transformation abilities and their relation to later mathematics performance. Psychological research83(7), 1465-1484.

Boyd, B., & Bargerhuff, M. E. (2009). Mathematics education and special education: Searching for common ground and the implications for teacher education. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development11, 54-67.

Goetz, T., Bieg, M., Lüdtke, O., Pekrun, R., & Hall, N. C. (2013). Do girls really experience more anxiety in mathematics?. Psychological science24(10), 2079-2087.

Wang, M. T., & Degol, J. L. (2017). Gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM): Current knowledge, implications for practice, policy, and future directions. Educational psychology review29(1), 119-140.

Capraro, R. M., Young, J. R., Lewis, C. W., Yetkiner, Z. E., & Woods, M. N. (2009). An examination of mathematics achievement and growth in a midwestern urban school district: Implications for teachers and administrators. Journal of Urban Mathematics Education2(2), 46-65.

Leikin, R., Berman, A., & Koichu, B. (2009). Creativity in mathematics and the education of gifted students. Brill Sense.

Wang, J., & Lin, E. (2009). A meta-analysis of comparative studies on Chinese and US students’ mathematics performance: Implications for mathematics education reform and research. Educational Research Review4(3), 177-195.

Leikin, R., & Pitta-Pantazi, D. (2013). Creativity and mathematics education: The state of the art. ZDM45(2), 159-166.

Dr. Liudmila Liutsko
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Monitoring the Own Spatial Thinking in Second Grade of Primary Education in a Spanish School: Preliminary Study Analyzing Gender Differences
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10090237 - 06 Sep 2020
Abstract
Previous studies on metacognitive performance have explored children’s abilities during primary school (7–11 years) in abstract and mathematical reasoning tasks. However, there have been no studies evaluating the metamemory processes with spatial tasks in primary school children, and even more generally, only a [...] Read more.
Previous studies on metacognitive performance have explored children’s abilities during primary school (7–11 years) in abstract and mathematical reasoning tasks. However, there have been no studies evaluating the metamemory processes with spatial tasks in primary school children, and even more generally, only a few studies have explored spatial metacognition in adults. Taking as a preliminary study a Spanish school, the present work explores the validity of the confidence judgment model when thinking about one’s own performance in a spatial test, for boys and girls in Second Year of Primary Education (mean age of 7 years). A total of 18 boys and 15 girls applied a 4-point scale to evaluate, item by item, the confidence of their responses in the Spatial aptitude test “E” of the EFAI-1 (Factorial Assessment of Intellectual Abilities to mentally process visual stimuli). Accessibility and Accuracy Indexes were calculated for each item of the spatial task. The effect of gender was analyzed too. The tasks were administered in small groups; at the end examiners interviewed each participant, performing the confidence judgment task, item by item, of the EFAI-1 previously answered. The results (analyses carried out by SPSS) showed a high mean confidence (3 mean points out of a maximum of 4), without finding any significant differences either in the spatial performance or in the mean confidence rating between boys and girls. A significant relationship between confidence judgments and spatial task performance accuracy was found. The relationship between confidence judgments and spatial performance cannot be confirmed. The procedure adapted for testing spatial judgments about the own responses has been useful for showing the well calibrated perception about performance at this stage. The implications of the results of this exploratory study and the potential of the application of the procedure to promote thought about one’s own spatial performance and the development of strategies that modulate the effective approach of this type of spatial tasks are discussed within an educational approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mathematics Education and Implications to Educational Psychology)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Effectiveness of Differentiated Instructional Approaches for Teaching Math to Preschoolers with Different Levels of Executive Functions
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10070181 - 10 Jul 2020
Abstract
Previous studies have found that the development of mathematical abilities, along with the development of executive functions, predict students’ subsequent academic performance. The present study aimed to assess the effectiveness of teaching the concept of area to preschool children with different levels of [...] Read more.
Previous studies have found that the development of mathematical abilities, along with the development of executive functions, predict students’ subsequent academic performance. The present study aimed to assess the effectiveness of teaching the concept of area to preschool children with different levels of cognitive processes (CP) including executive functions and short-term memory. The experiment introduced the concept by using three different instructional approaches: traditional, contextual, and modeling. The sample included 100 children aged 6–7 years (M = 6.5 years), of whom 43% were boys. Each experimental condition included children with low, middle, and high levels of CP, as determined based on the NEPSY-II subtests. The children with low CP levels showed higher results in assimilating the notion of area after being taught using the contextual approach. In contrast, children with high CP levels showed a higher mastery of the concept of area following the use of the modeling approach. The results suggest the importance of CP development in building ways of mastering mathematical content. This contributes to choosing the optimal path of teaching mathematics for preschoolers, taking into account the development of their cognitive processes to improve their academic performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mathematics Education and Implications to Educational Psychology)
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