Game-Based Learning: Evaluation of Integrating Pedagogical Content and Assessment

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (3 June 2022) | Viewed by 3982

Special Issue Editors

School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Glasgow G72 0LH, UK
Interests: serious games and games-based learning; pedagogical content integration; assessment integration; evaluation of games in various subject areas and industrial settings for the purposes of education and training
Dr. Gavin Baxter
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Glasgow G72 0LH, UK
Interests: embedding employability within the Higher Education context; facilitating and supporting graduate attributes within the course curriculum; investigating the effectiveness as well as potential drawbacks of online pedagogy in the context of blended and hybrid delivery; games-based learning and serious games for pedagogical delivery
Dr. Marco Gilardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Glasgow G72 0LH, UK
Interests: extended realities (XR) technologies and their applications to education and business

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As a result of the rapid advancement in computer games technology and development software such as game engines, it is now possible to implement an educational game with relative ease for a vast number of subject areas. Games have the increased advantage of being risk-free, interactive, immersive, and, due to mobile technology, relatively ubiquitous. However, if games are to be integrated into formal education for the purposes of teaching, then they have to be underpinned by empirical research, pedagogical principles, frameworks, and good practice in terms of learning content integration and assessment mechanism integration. Games-based learning (GBL) is a subset of serious games that has captured the interest of educationalists, particularly in the new era of increased hybrid delivery brought upon by COVID-19. GBL as a supplementary learning approach can be very motivational and engaging while appealing to the new types of learners that we are seeing with increased frequency in education. Challenges associated with GBL are related to integrating learning content, assessment content, and conducting appropriate empirical evaluations of these games to support validity as a potential recognized pedagogical mechanism. This Special Issue features:

  • Reviews of research studies investigating empirical evidence associated with the use of games for teaching, education, or training;
  • Empirical evaluations of the use of games in any format (PC, AR, VR, MR, Mobile Device) for any subject;
  • The validation of frameworks for the informed integration of pedagogical content, assessment mechanisms;
  • Reviews of content, and assessment integration frameworks for games based on recognized learning theories and models.

The goal of the Special Issue is to raise attention to the fact that games are motivational and potentially effective but must be based on pedagogical principles and recognized frameworks and models to be effective, bolstered by stringent research studies including longitudinal analysis, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials. This Special Issue invites submissions about games or simulations that have been developed using sound pedagogical principles and are applied and evaluated to any level of education and training from any subject area. Frameworks and processes formulated for advancing the GBL field in terms of content integration, assessment integration, or evaluation are also welcome.

Dr. Thomas Hainey
Dr. Gavin Baxter
Dr. Marco Gilardi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • games-based learning
  • serious games
  • learning content
  • pedagogy
  • assessment
  • evaluation
  • frameworks
  • empirical evidence

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 457 KiB  
Article
The Role of Game-Based Learning in Experiential Education: Tool Validation, Motivation Assessment, and Outcomes Evaluation among a Sample of Pharmacy Students
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(7), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12070434 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3322
Abstract
(1) Background: There is a scarcity of data regarding game-based learning (GBL) in experiential pharmacy education; in addition, the impact of educational games on the attainment of intended learning outcomes and students’ motivation to actively learn and practice through non-traditional pedagogical tools are [...] Read more.
(1) Background: There is a scarcity of data regarding game-based learning (GBL) in experiential pharmacy education; in addition, the impact of educational games on the attainment of intended learning outcomes and students’ motivation to actively learn and practice through non-traditional pedagogical tools are yet to be explored. (2) Methods: This was a prospective quasi-experimental study that introduced GBL into the Pharmacy Practice Experience course of the Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) program at the Lebanese International University in Lebanon. Data collection took place between July and September 2021. The study objectives were to assess the impact of GBL on attaining intended learning outcomes, determine students’ motivation to engage in GBL, and assess the impact of this motivation on the attainment of learning outcomes. (3) Results: GBL was associated with a significantly higher exam average (mean difference = 7.152, p < 0.001). Moreover, an active learning motivation assessment scale (ALMAS) was constructed and validated; it was found to have good reliability as well as high sensitivity and specificity, and it determined a good level of motivation to engage in GBL. Game-based learners with higher motivation scores had significantly higher exam averages compared to those with lower scores (Beta = 0.296, 95% CI 0.110–0.545, p = 0.004). (4) Conclusion: GBL was associated with better attainment of intended learning outcomes. Students appear to be motivated to learn by this style of active learning, and motivation is prognostic of the attainment of learning outcomes. Full article
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