Mathematics and Physics Education: Development and Practice in Connection with STEM and STEAM Education

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "STEM Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 7126

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
NUS College, National University of Singapore, 21 Lower Kent Ridge Rd., Singapore 119077, Singapore
Interests: mathematics education; physics education; STEM education; STEAM education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to highlight empirical research in mathematics and physics education in connection to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) education across K12 and university levels. The topic is particularly relevant to the ongoing push for transdisciplinary and multidisciplinary education at all levels to prepare students for the volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity of the 21st century. Therefore, there should be more in-depth discourse on how existing disciplinary subjects, such as mathematics and physics, may contribute to integrative STEM and STEAM education and, similarly, on the affordance of STEM and STEAM education in mathematics and physics education.

We invite authors to submit original research on mathematics and physics education and on STEM/STEAM education, and have a special interest in studies that relate these two domains. We are particularly interested in models depicting the teaching and learning of mathematics and physics in non-major and non-traditional settings, for example: problem-based, project-based, and team-based learning activities for solving transdisciplinary and multidisciplinary complex problems, or the teaching of physics to non-majors (such as engineering or life science majors). We also welcome articles that discuss the professional development of mathematics and physics teachers within STEAM education settings.

We also welcome additional topics that fall under the purview of this Special Issue.

Dr. Da Yang Tan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mathematics education
  • physics education
  • STEM education
  • STEAM education
  • educational design
  • design-based research
  • professional development

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

22 pages, 9553 KiB  
Article
Application and Assessment of an Experiential Deformation Approach as a Didactive Tool of Truss Structures in Architectural Engineering
by Maristella E. Voutetaki
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 354; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14040354 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 431
Abstract
Experiential learning methods are advantageous for students as they motivate them to comprehend structural concepts without complex calculations, enhancing their inherent understanding of static principles. This research introduces a novel, cost-effective haptic didactic tool to enhance the approach to teaching trusses to students [...] Read more.
Experiential learning methods are advantageous for students as they motivate them to comprehend structural concepts without complex calculations, enhancing their inherent understanding of static principles. This research introduces a novel, cost-effective haptic didactic tool to enhance the approach to teaching trusses to students in a School of Architecture. The primary goal is to address challenges associated with the complexities of teaching structural systems within the context of architectural education. The proposed approach is related to the most critical issue, which is the state in which the individual elements are under applied load, compression, or tension. The approach explores the deformation of the truss elements and establishes a connection between their visible deformation and the stress they develop under various loads. As a didactic tool, this approach offers an alternative perspective to help students understand truss function under various loads. Also, an assessment procedure of learning outcomes and satisfaction indices has been structured to validate the impact on students on the proposed educational procedure. The findings underscore the significant educational efficiency of the proposed procedure as a sustainable way to connect the structural engineering challenges arising during design courses and creative skills in architecture engineering. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 1856 KiB  
Article
Students’ Understanding of Microscopic Models of Electrical and Thermal Conductivity: Findings within the Development of a Multiple-Choice Concept Inventory
by Lejla Jelovica, Nataša Erceg, Vanes Mešić and Ivica Aviani
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030275 - 06 Mar 2024
Viewed by 744
Abstract
Solid-state physics has important applications in the development of modern technologies. Although solid-state concepts, such as electric and thermal conductivity, are included in the curricula at all educational levels, even university students have many incorrect ideas about them. The incorrect ideas identified in [...] Read more.
Solid-state physics has important applications in the development of modern technologies. Although solid-state concepts, such as electric and thermal conductivity, are included in the curricula at all educational levels, even university students have many incorrect ideas about them. The incorrect ideas identified in previous studies are mainly related to macroscopic aspects of solid-state physics. With the aim of gaining a more comprehensive insight into students’ understanding of solid-state physics, we have developed a multiple-choice concept inventory on microscopic models of electric and thermal conductivity of solids (METCS). The inventory has been field-tested with a sample consisting of 233 first-year medical faculty and engineering students from the University of Rijeka (Croatia). METCS proved to have good psychometric features and it helped to uncover many incorrect ideas that have not been reported in the earlier physics education literature. The findings from this study could be a good starting point for the development of evidence-based, university-level tutorials on microscopic models of electric and thermal conductivity. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 3580 KiB  
Article
Integration of Physics and Mathematics in STEM Education: Use of Modeling
by Angeles Dominguez, Jorge De la Garza, Monica Quezada-Espinoza and Genaro Zavala
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14010020 - 24 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1944
Abstract
Within STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education, integrating real-world problem scenarios is paramount. Within interdisciplinary education, modeling is an approach to fostering student learning and skill development in a student-centered learning environment. This study focuses on an integrated physics and mathematics course [...] Read more.
Within STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education, integrating real-world problem scenarios is paramount. Within interdisciplinary education, modeling is an approach to fostering student learning and skill development in a student-centered learning environment. This study focuses on an integrated physics and mathematics course in STEM education based on modeling for first-year engineering students. The main objectives of this study are to analyze students’ models, assess the effectiveness of the pedagogical approach, and evaluate the benefits of integrative education. This study uses a Model-Application Activity as a closure for the quadratic model and extends the models built to a two-dimensional motion situation. The core activity involves a real-world experiment where students attempt to roll a ball down a ramp into a cup. While most groups successfully constructed theoretical models, only a few hit the target, highlighting the complexities of applying theoretical knowledge to real-world scenarios. The study also emphasizes the seamless integration of physics and mathematics, enriching the learning experience and making the models more robust and versatile. Despite the promising results, the study identifies a gap between theoretical understanding and practical application, suggesting the need for more hands-on activities in the curriculum. In conclusion, this study underlines the value of integrating physics and mathematics through modeling and a student-centered approach, setting the stage for future research to enhance the effectiveness of STEM education. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 2753 KiB  
Article
STEM-Based Curriculum and Creative Thinking in High School Students
by Rana Y. Khalil, Hassan Tairab, Ahmad Qablan, Khaleel Alarabi and Yousef Mansour
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1195; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121195 - 28 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1998
Abstract
Creative thinking as a 21st century skill is fundamental to human development and a catalyst for innovation. Researchers frequently study it as it encourages students to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information from different angles, vital for making informed decisions and solving complex problems. [...] Read more.
Creative thinking as a 21st century skill is fundamental to human development and a catalyst for innovation. Researchers frequently study it as it encourages students to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information from different angles, vital for making informed decisions and solving complex problems. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the impact of a STEM-based curriculum on the development of creative thinking in high school students studying physics. Employing a quasi-experimental design, data were collected from 94 high school students of mixed gender and grade levels using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT). Data analyses involve multivariance analyses (MANOVA) to answer the research questions. The findings showed that a STEM-based curriculum significantly impacted the development of students’ creative thinking compared to students who studied under a traditional curriculum regarding the metrics of fluency, flexibility, and originality. However, the development of participants’ metric of elaboration remained the same. Furthermore, the findings showed a significant influence of the grade level of participants who studied under a STEM-based curriculum on the metrics of fluency and elaboration. On the other hand, the findings revealed that grade level did not relate to the STEM-based curriculum for the metrics of flexibility and originality. The findings are discussed in light of recent research on the impact of STEM education. Full article
18 pages, 11865 KiB  
Article
The Equilibrium Challenge, a New Way to Teach Engineering Mechanics in Architecture Degrees
by Nicolás Montés, Lucía Hilario, Javier Rivera, Ángel López, Teresa Ferrer, Pedro Verdejo, Ignacio Juan and Ana Ábalos
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(4), 398; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13040398 - 14 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1407
Abstract
Vocation is one of the determining factors taken into account by students when choosing their university studies. However, when the students start their studies, in their first year, they will find a series of basic subjects that barely motivate or stimulate them. In [...] Read more.
Vocation is one of the determining factors taken into account by students when choosing their university studies. However, when the students start their studies, in their first year, they will find a series of basic subjects that barely motivate or stimulate them. In the specific case of mathematics, the problem is aggravated when many of the students already begin the first year showing rejection towards this subject. The lack of motivation for mathematics also affects the subject of physics because “the role of mathematics is to be the language of physics”. The EXPLORIA project proposed by the CEU Cardenal Herrera University is a potential solution to this problem. The objective of this project is the implementation of STEAM learning (Science Technology Engineering Art Mathematics) in the Degree in Fundamentals of Architecture at CEU Cardenal Herrera University through the EXPLORIA project. This article focuses on the activities carried out in the subject of physics in the Degree in Fundamentals of Architecture, corresponding to the part of mechanical engineering in order to show that through the realization of different challenges, we can develop creative products, new buildings with their logos and storytelling, as well as connect with the rest of subjects. For its development, students must use everyday objects within their reach, such as forks, spoons, knives, shoes, etc., to build an object or structure that must remain in a “creative balance” and this will serve as an inspiration for new buildings. These new creations are evaluated by an architecture team who fills in a rubric to evaluate the creativity and originality of the products. The number of students included in this project was 24 and the participants’ age ranged between 18 and 20 (similarly distributed). At the end of the work, an anonymous ad hoc questionnaire was carried out to show the students’ assessment of the new teaching methodology and the challenges developed in the subject of physics. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop