Special Issue "Pathways to Psychological Resilience in Breast Cancer Survivorship"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychosocial Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 3347

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nazanin Derakshan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Building Resilience in Breast Cancer (BRiC), Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck University of London, London WC1E 7HX, UK
Interests: Emotional vulnerability in breast cancer; resilience; anxiety; depression; cognitive function; neurocognitive training; neuroscience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Breast cancer is the biggest cause of cancer, and the biggest malignancy in women worldwide. Recent reviews (Wang et al., 2020) highlight that anxiety and depression can independently predict cancer recurrence and cancer specific mortality in breast cancer respectively, with depression increasing risk of mortality by 30%. There is an urgent need to understand the underlying mechanisms behind emotional and cognitive vulnerability in this population and implement resilience-based interventions to improve quality of life.

This special issue will bring together research from a range of methods and disciplines, encouraging younger and more established researchers to contribute. It will draw on research investigating mechanisms of emotional vulnerability and resilience in individuals diagnosed with breast cancer, the impact of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment on quality of life and explore interventions that deliver longer term benefits with sustainability.

Prof. Dr. Nazanin Derakshan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emotional vulnerability
  • breast cancer
  • cognitive function
  • workability, quality of life
  • resilience
  • interventions
  • training
  • survivorship
  • quality of life
  • mixed methods
  • neuroscience

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Machine Learning Approach to Predict Stress Hormones and Inflammatory Markers Using Illness Perception and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(4), 3150-3171; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28040275 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 780
Abstract
Psychosocial factors have become central concepts in oncology research. However, their role in the prognosis of the disease is not yet well established. Studies on this subject report contradictory findings. We examine if illness perception and quality of life reports measured at baseline [...] Read more.
Psychosocial factors have become central concepts in oncology research. However, their role in the prognosis of the disease is not yet well established. Studies on this subject report contradictory findings. We examine if illness perception and quality of life reports measured at baseline could predict the stress hormones and inflammatory markers in breast cancer survivors, one year later. We use statistics and machine learning methods to analyze our data and find the best prediction model. Patients with stage I to III breast cancer (N = 70) were assessed twice, at baseline and one year later, and completed scales assessing quality of life and illness perception. Blood and urine samples were obtained to measure stress hormones (cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and inflammatory markers (c-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and fibrinogen). Family quality of life is a strong predictor for ACTH. Women who perceive their illness as being more chronic at baseline have higher ESR and fibrinogen values one year later. The artificial intelligence (AI) data analysis yields the highest prediction score of 81.2% for the ACTH stress hormone, and 70% for the inflammatory marker ESR. A chronic timeline, illness control, health and family quality of life were important features associated with the best predictive results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathways to Psychological Resilience in Breast Cancer Survivorship)
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Article
Digital Innovation in Oncological Primary Treatment for Well-Being of Patients: Psychological Caring as Prompt for Enhancing Quality of Life
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(4), 2452-2465; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28040224 - 02 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1430
Abstract
One side-effect of oncological treatment is chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), a temporary form of hair loss that could influence patients’ mental health. Digitised scalp cooling systems are assuming an important role in the clinical setting during adjuvant treatment, promising hair loss prevention and allowing [...] Read more.
One side-effect of oncological treatment is chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), a temporary form of hair loss that could influence patients’ mental health. Digitised scalp cooling systems are assuming an important role in the clinical setting during adjuvant treatment, promising hair loss prevention and allowing an efficient procedure to reinforce patients’ mental health during chemotherapy by avoiding CIA. The present study was carried out through two research protocols: in Research Protocol 1, we conducted a randomised clinical study to evaluate the emotional impact of using scalp cooling technology in women with BC compared with a traditional chemotherapy setting; in Research Protocol 2, we conducted an observational pre-post study involving women with BC diagnosis being under adjuvant chemotherapy in two experimental conditions: no scalp cooling application and scalp cooling application. Seventy-four women undergoing chemotherapy, aged 30–55 years, were enrolled in both research protocols. We investigated oncological patients’ psychological dimensions including body image, body appreciation, expectations, and satisfaction with the scalp cooling treatment, with reference to chemotherapy treatment applying the scalp cooling solution. Our data evidenced the need to implement a supportive clinical approach via brief, tailored psychological intervention addressing patients’ progressive adaptation to chemotherapy adverse events and their concerns regarding induced alopecia and the value of the scalp cooling system. Patients receiving the innovative chemotherapy probably coped with it by neglecting its physical impact, instead focusing on avoiding alopecia by using the technological solution and neglecting the emotional impact of chemotherapy as a severe pharmacological treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathways to Psychological Resilience in Breast Cancer Survivorship)
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