Special Issue "Dawn of a New Era in the Microenvironment-Targeted Treatment for Multiple Myeloma"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Hematology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2023 | Viewed by 1418

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rikio Suzuki
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Hematology/Oncology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan
Interests: multiple myeloma; small-molecule inhibitors; myelomagenesis; chemoresistance; tumor microenvironment
Dr. Daisuke Ogiya
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Hematology/Oncology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan
Interests: multiple myeloma; small-molecule inhibitors; myelomagenesis; chemoresistance; tumor microenvironment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematopoietic malignancy originating from plasma cells. The outcome of multiple myeloma treatment has improved dramatically with the introduction of novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and immunotherapies. In particular, elucidation of the onset mechanism of myelomagenesis and drug resistance mechanism using the latest analytical technologies is accelerating the development of these agents. As a result, in some cases, it has become possible to achieve a complete response or minimal residual disease negativity that can be said to be almost curable. Importantly, MM cells are known to manipulate the bone marrow microenvironment by altering the expression pattern of cytokines and biasing the diversity of cells in the bone marrow, finally leading to drug resistance. Therefore, the further expansion of drug discovery targeting the bone marrow microenvironment, partly focused on cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) caused by the interaction between MM cells and bone marrow stromal cells, is being eagerly attempted. To provide curative therapies in the future, it may be necessary to discuss the possibility of treatment targeting myeloma-specific cellular elements such as inflammatory stromal cells and immunosuppressive cells. This Special Issue will highlight some translational aspects of research on the treatment targeting the MM microenvironment.

Dr. Rikio Suzuki
Dr. Daisuke Ogiya
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • multiple myeloma
  • microenvironment
  • chemoresistance
  • CAMDR
  • inflammatory stromal cell
  • immunosuppressive cells
  • proteasome inhibitor
  • immunomodulatory drug
  • immunotherapy
  • novel drug

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
Treating Multiple Myeloma in the Context of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(11), 8975-9005; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29110705 - 21 Nov 2022
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Abstract
The treatment landscape of multiple myeloma (MM) has evolved considerably with the FDA-approval of at least 15 drugs over the past two decades. Together with the use of autologous stem cell transplantation, these novel therapies have resulted in significant survival benefit for patients [...] Read more.
The treatment landscape of multiple myeloma (MM) has evolved considerably with the FDA-approval of at least 15 drugs over the past two decades. Together with the use of autologous stem cell transplantation, these novel therapies have resulted in significant survival benefit for patients with MM. In particular, our improved understanding of the BM and immune microenvironment has led to the development of highly effective immunotherapies that have demonstrated unprecedented response rates even in the multiple refractory disease setting. However, MM remains challenging to treat especially in a high-risk setting. A key mediator of therapeutic resistance in MM is the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment; a deeper understanding is necessary to facilitate the development of therapies that target MM in the context of the BM milieu to elicit deeper and more durable responses with the ultimate goal of long-term control or a cure of MM. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the role the BM microenvironment plays in MM pathogenesis, with a focus on its immunosuppressive nature. We also review FDA-approved immunotherapies currently in clinical use and highlight promising immunotherapeutic approaches on the horizon. Full article
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Review
Targeting CAM-DR and Mitochondrial Transfer for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(11), 8529-8539; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29110672 - 09 Nov 2022
Viewed by 569
Abstract
The prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) has improved dramatically with the introduction of new therapeutic drugs, but the disease eventually becomes drug-resistant, following an intractable and incurable course. A myeloma niche (MM niche) develops in the bone marrow microenvironment and plays [...] Read more.
The prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) has improved dramatically with the introduction of new therapeutic drugs, but the disease eventually becomes drug-resistant, following an intractable and incurable course. A myeloma niche (MM niche) develops in the bone marrow microenvironment and plays an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of MM. In particular, adhesion between MM cells and bone marrow stromal cells mediated by adhesion molecules induces cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Analyses of the role of mitochondria in cancer cells, including MM cells, has revealed that the mechanism leading to drug resistance involves exchange of mitochondria between cells (mitochondrial transfer) via tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) within the MM niche. Here, we describe the discovery of these drug resistance mechanisms and the identification of promising therapeutic agents primarily targeting CAM-DR, mitochondrial transfer, and TNTs. Full article
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