Special Issue "From Quantum Paraelectric/Ferroelectric Perovskite Oxides to High Temperature Superconducting Copper Oxides -- In Honor of Professor K.A. Müller for His Lifework"

A special issue of Condensed Matter (ISSN 2410-3896). This special issue belongs to the section "Superconductivity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2020).

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Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Annette Bussmann-Holder
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstr.1, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Interests: ferroelectrics; antiferroelectricss; multiferroics; magnetism; phase transitions; superconductivity; nonlinear interactions
Prof. em. Dr. Hugo Keller
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physik-Institut der Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich, Switzerland
Interests: magnetism; superconductivity; critical phenomena and phase transitions in low-dimensional magnetic systems; biomolecular physics; muon and muonium physics in condensed matter; microscopic and macroscopic properties of novel superconductors (cuprates, magnesium diboride, iron-based superconductors) and related magnetic systems; vortex matter in cuprate and other novel superconductors; colossal magnetic resistance (CMR) in manganites; isotope and polaronic effects in novel superconductors and manganites; pressure effects in novel superconductors; microscopic magnetic properties of magnetic and superconducting multilayer structures; electronic; magnetic and structural properties of multiferroic systems; Experimental methods: Mössbauer effect, bulk and low-energy muon-spin rotation (muSR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), neutron scattering, SQUID and torque magnetometry, transport experiments
Prof. Dr. Antonio Bianconi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Rome International Center for Materials Science Superstripes (RICMASS), Via dei Sabelli 119A, 00185 Roma, Italy
Interests: synchrotron radiation research; protein fluctuations; active sites of metalloproteins; origin of life; selected molecules in prebiotic world; quantum phenomena in complex matter; quantum confinement; superstripes in complex matter; lattice complexity in transition metal oxides; high Tc superconductors; valence fluctuation materials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of the journal is dedicated to the lifework of Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. multi. K. Alex Müller. This comprises multiple contributions to solid state physics starting early on in the field of structural phase transitions in perovskite oxides with emphasis on electron-paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations of those compounds. From those essential knowledge was gained on the order parameter of the phase transition and the driving mechanism. The suppression of the expected transition to the polar state in SrTiO3 was coined quantum paraelectric by him and has raised enormous interest in the community. Further EPR studies by him are related to resonances of impurity ions in diverse perovskites and related crystals, thereby discovering experimentally negative U-centers later on established theoretically. The Jahn-Teller effect attracted his attention early on and played a key role in the discovery of superconductivity where especially the Jahn-Teller polaron was at the heart of it. The polaron has been shown to be vital also in Fermi glasses, LaBaNiO4 and doped polythiophene. The concept of the Jahn-Teller polaron in connection with perovskite oxides inspired him to search for superconductivity in these compounds which – as everybody knows – was successful. Together with Georg Bednorz he discovered high temperature superconductivity in LaBaCuO with the highest transition temperatures at ambient pressure ever observed which was awarded with the Nobel prize only one year later. This discovery caused an enormous world-wide breakthrough in basic research as well as in possible applications. In order to explain these findings, the polaron concept and the bipolaron condensation were suggested by him. In order to verify this concept he proposed to search for unconventional isotope effects which have indeed been observed in cuprates.

Contributions to all fields mentioned above and related topics are welcome.

Please kindly noted that the fees for all submissions to our Special Issue will be wavied.

Prof. Dr. Annette Bussmann-Holder
Prof. Dr. Hugo Keller
Prof. Antonio Bianconi
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (20 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Measuring the Electron–Phonon Interaction in Two-Dimensional Superconductors with He-Atom Scattering
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040079 - 03 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 902
Abstract
Helium-atom scattering (HAS) spectroscopy from conducting surfaces has been shown to provide direct information on the electron–phonon interaction, more specifically the mass-enhancement factor λ from the temperature dependence of the Debye–Waller exponent, and the mode-selected electron–phonon coupling constants λQν from the [...] Read more.
Helium-atom scattering (HAS) spectroscopy from conducting surfaces has been shown to provide direct information on the electron–phonon interaction, more specifically the mass-enhancement factor λ from the temperature dependence of the Debye–Waller exponent, and the mode-selected electron–phonon coupling constants λQν from the inelastic HAS intensities from individual surface phonons. The recent applications of the method to superconducting ultra-thin films, quasi-1D high-index surfaces, and layered transition-metal and topological pnictogen chalcogenides are briefly reviewed. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
First-Principles Calculation of Copper Oxide Superconductors That Supports the Kamimura-Suwa Model
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040069 - 02 Nov 2020
Viewed by 881
Abstract
In 1986 Bednorz and Műller discovered high temperature superconductivity in copper oxides by chemically doping holes into La2CuO4 (LCO), the antiferromagnetic insulator. Despite intense experimental and theoretical research during the past 34 years, no general consensus on the electronic-spin structures [...] Read more.
In 1986 Bednorz and Műller discovered high temperature superconductivity in copper oxides by chemically doping holes into La2CuO4 (LCO), the antiferromagnetic insulator. Despite intense experimental and theoretical research during the past 34 years, no general consensus on the electronic-spin structures and the origin of pseudogap has been obtained. In this circumstance, we performed a first-principles calculation of underdoped cuprate superconductors La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) within the meta-generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory. Our calculations clarify first the important role of the anti Jahn-Teller (JT) effect, the backward deformation against the JT distortion in La2CuO4 by doping extra holes. The resulting electronic structure agrees with the two-component theory provided by the tight-binding model of Kamimura and Suwa (K-S), which has been also used to elucidate the d-wave superconductivity. Our first-principles calculation thus justifies the K-S model and demonstrates advanced understanding of cuprates. For example, the remarkable feature of our calculations is the appearance of the spin-polarized band with a nearly flat-band character, showing the peaky nature in the density of states at the Fermi level. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Perovskite Crystals: Unique Pseudo-Jahn–Teller Origin of Ferroelectricity, Multiferroicity, Permittivity, Flexoelectricity, and Polar Nanoregions
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040068 - 02 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 850
Abstract
In a semi-review paper, we show that the local pseudo-Jahn–Teller effect (PJTE) in transition metal B ion center of ABO3 perovskite crystals, notably BaTiO3, is the basis of all their main properties. The vibronic coupling between the ground and excited [...] Read more.
In a semi-review paper, we show that the local pseudo-Jahn–Teller effect (PJTE) in transition metal B ion center of ABO3 perovskite crystals, notably BaTiO3, is the basis of all their main properties. The vibronic coupling between the ground and excited electronic states of the local BO6 center results in dipolar distortions, leading to an eight-well adiabatic potential energy surface with local tunneling or over-the-barrier transitions between them. The intercenter interaction between these dipolar dynamic units results in the formation of the temperature-dependent three ferroelectric and one paraelectric phases with order–disorder phase transitions. The local PJTE dipolar distortion is subject to the presence of sufficiently close in energy local electronic states with opposite parity but the same spin multiplicity, thus limiting the electronic structure and spin of the B(dn) ions that can trigger ferroelectricity. This allowed us to formulate the necessary conditions for the transition metal perovskites to possess both ferroelectric and magnetic (multiferroic) properties simultaneously. It clarifies the role of spin in the spontaneous polarization. We also show that the interaction between the independently rotating dipoles in the paraelectric phase may lead to a self-assembly process resulting in polar nanoregions and relaxor properties. Exploring interactions of PJTE ferroelectrics with external perturbations, we revealed a completely novel property—orientational polarization in solids—a phenomenon first noticed by P. Debye in 1912 as a possibility, which was never found till now. The hindered rotation of the local dipole moments and their ordering along an external field is qualitatively similar to the behavior of polar molecules in liquids, thus adding a new dimension to the properties of solids—notably, the perovskite ferroelectrics. We estimated the contribution of the orientational polarization to the permittivity and flexoelectricity of perovskite crystals in different limiting conditions. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Temperature-Independent Cuprate Pseudogap from Planar Oxygen NMR
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040066 - 21 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 829
Abstract
Planar oxygen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and shift data from all cuprate superconductors available in the literature are analyzed. They reveal a temperature-independent pseudogap at the Fermi surface, which increases with decreasing doping in family-specific ways, i.e., for some materials, the pseudogap [...] Read more.
Planar oxygen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and shift data from all cuprate superconductors available in the literature are analyzed. They reveal a temperature-independent pseudogap at the Fermi surface, which increases with decreasing doping in family-specific ways, i.e., for some materials, the pseudogap is substantial at optimal doping while for others it is nearly closed at optimal doping. The states above the pseudogap, or in its absence are similar for all cuprates and doping levels, and Fermi liquid-like. If the pseudogap is assumed exponential it can be as large as about 1500 K for the most underdoped systems, relating it to the exchange coupling. The pseudogap can vary substantially throughout a material, being the cause of cuprate inhomogeneity in terms of charge and spin, so consequences for the NMR analyses are discussed. This pseudogap appears to be in agreement with the specific heat data measured for the YBaCuO family of materials, long ago. Nuclear relaxation and shift show deviations from this scenario near Tc, possibly due to other in-gap states. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Phase Separation and Pairing Fluctuations in Oxide Materials
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040065 - 19 Oct 2020
Viewed by 766
Abstract
The microscopic mechanism of charge instabilities and the formation of inhomogeneous states in systems with strong electron correlations is investigated. We demonstrate that within a strong coupling expansion the single-band Hubbard model shows an instability towards phase separation and extend the approach also [...] Read more.
The microscopic mechanism of charge instabilities and the formation of inhomogeneous states in systems with strong electron correlations is investigated. We demonstrate that within a strong coupling expansion the single-band Hubbard model shows an instability towards phase separation and extend the approach also for an analysis of phase separation in the Hubbard-Kanamori hamiltonian as a prototypical multiband model. We study the pairing fluctuations on top of an inhomogeneous stripe state where superconducting correlations in the extended s-wave and d-wave channels correspond to (anti)bound states in the two-particle spectra. Whereas extended s-wave fluctuations are relevant on the scale of the local interaction parameter U, we find that d-wave fluctuations are pronounced in the energy range of the active subband which crosses the Fermi level. As a result, low energy spin and charge fluctuations can transfer the d-wave correlations from the bound states to the low energy quasiparticle bands. Our investigations therefore help to understand the coexistence of stripe correlations and d-wave superconductivity in cuprates. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Unconventional Transport Properties of Reduced Tungsten Oxide WO2.9
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040063 - 16 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 757
Abstract
The temperature and magnetic field dependence of resistivity in WO2.9 was investigated. The variation of resistivity with temperature displayed unusual features, such as a broad maximum around 230 K and a logarithmic increase of resistivity below 16 K. In the temperature range [...] Read more.
The temperature and magnetic field dependence of resistivity in WO2.9 was investigated. The variation of resistivity with temperature displayed unusual features, such as a broad maximum around 230 K and a logarithmic increase of resistivity below 16 K. In the temperature range 16–230 K, we observed metallic-like behavior with a positive temperature coefficient. The combined analysis of resistivity and magnetoresistance (MR) data shows that these unusual transport properties of WO2.9 can be understood by considering the (bi)polaronic nature of charge carriers. In contrast to magnetization data, superconducting transition below Tc = 80 K was not detected in resistivity measurements, indicating that the superconductivity is localized in small regions that do not percolate. We found a strong increase in positive MR below 80 K. This effect is similar to that observed in underdoped cuprates, where the substantial increase of MR is attributed to superconducting fluctuations in small clusters. Therefore, the temperature dependence of MR indicates the presence of non-percolating superconducting clusters in WO2.9 below 80 K in agreement with magnetization data. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Ferroelectricity, Superconductivity, and SrTiO3—Passions of K.A. Müller
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040060 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1308
Abstract
SrTiO3 is an insulating material which, using chemical doping, pressure, strain or isotope substitution, can be turned into a ferroelectric material or into a superconductor. The material itself, and the two aforementioned phenomena, have been subjects of intensive research of Karl Alex Müller and have been a source of inspiration, among other things, for his Nobel prize-winning research on high temperature superconductivity. An intriguing outstanding question is whether the occurrence of ferroelectricity and superconductivity in the same material is just a coincidence, or whether a deeper connection exists. In addition there is the empirical question of how these two phenomena interact with each other. Here we show that it is possible to induce superconductivity in a two-dimensional layer at the interface of SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 when we make the SrTiO3 ferroelectric by means of 18O substitution. Our experiments indicate that the ferroelectricity is perfectly compatible with having a superconducting two-dimensional electron system at the interface. This provides a promising avenue for manipulating superconductivity in a non centrosymmetric environment. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication
Detection of Two Phenomena Opposite to the Expected Ones
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040056 - 24 Sep 2020
Viewed by 633
Abstract
Both phenomena mentioned in the title were revealed by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) method. The first phenomenon was found in superconducting La metal with Er impurities—the spin relaxation rate of the erbium impurities was sharply decreasing after transition into the superconducting state [...] Read more.
Both phenomena mentioned in the title were revealed by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) method. The first phenomenon was found in superconducting La metal with Er impurities—the spin relaxation rate of the erbium impurities was sharply decreasing after transition into the superconducting state instead of the expected, i.e., the well-known Hebel–Slichter peak. The second unexpected phenomenon was discovered in the YbRh2Si2 compound—an excellent EPR signal from the Yb ions was observed at temperatures below the Kondo temperature determined thermodynamically, while according to the existing belief the EPR signal should not be observed at these temperatures due to the Kondo effect. In this tribute to K. Alex Müller, I describe the nature of the detected phenomena. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Suppression of the s-Wave Order Parameter Near the Surface of the Infinite-Layer Electron-Doped Cuprate Superconductor Sr0.9La0.1CuO2
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(3), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5030050 - 03 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 710
Abstract
The temperature dependencies of the in-plane (λab) and out-of-plane (λc) components of the magnetic field penetration depth were investigated near the surface and in the bulk of the electron-doped superconductor Sr0.9La0.1CuO2 by means of magnetization measurements. The measured λab(T) and λc(T) were analyzed in terms of a two-gap model with mixed s+d-wave symmetry of the order parameter. λab(T) is well described by an almost pure anisotropic d-wave symmetry component (96%), mainly reflecting the surface properties of the sample. In contrast, λc(T) exhibits a mixed s+d-wave order parameter with a substantial s-wave component of more than 50%. The comparison of λab2(T) measured near the surface with that determined in the bulk by means of the muon-spin rotation/relaxation technique demonstrates that the suppression of the s-wave component of the order parameter near the surface is associated with a reduction of the superfluid density by more than a factor of two. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Lattice Litany for Transition Metal Oxides
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5030046 - 13 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 860
Abstract
In this tribute to K Alex Müller, I describe how his early insights have influenced future decades of research on perovskite ferroelectrics and more broadly transition metal oxides (TMOs) and related quantum materials. I use his influence on my own research journey to [...] Read more.
In this tribute to K Alex Müller, I describe how his early insights have influenced future decades of research on perovskite ferroelectrics and more broadly transition metal oxides (TMOs) and related quantum materials. I use his influence on my own research journey to discuss impacts in three areas: structural phase transitions, precursor structure, and quantum paraelectricity. I emphasize materials functionality in ground, metastable, and excited states arising from competitions among lattice, charge, and spin degrees of freedom, which results in highly tunable landscapes and complex networks of multiscale configurations controlling macroscopic functions. I discuss competitions between short- and long-range forces as particularly important in TMOs (and related materials classes) because of their localized and directional metal orbitals and the polarizable oxygen ions. I emphasize crucial consequences of elasticity and metal–oxygen charge transfer. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Polaronic States and Superconductivity in WO3-x
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5020032 - 01 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 903
Abstract
Superconducting domain boundaries were found in WO3-x and doped WO3. The charge carriers in WO3-type materials were identified by Schirmer and Salje as bipolarons. Several previous attempts to determine the electronic properties of polarons in WO3 failed [...] Read more.
Superconducting domain boundaries were found in WO3-x and doped WO3. The charge carriers in WO3-type materials were identified by Schirmer and Salje as bipolarons. Several previous attempts to determine the electronic properties of polarons in WO3 failed until Bousque et al. (2020) reported a full first principle calculation of free polarons in WO3. They confirmed the model of Schirmer and Salje that each single polaron is centred around one tungsten position with surplus charges smeared over the adjacent eight tungsten positions. Small additional charges are distributed further apart. Further calculations to clarify the coupling mechanism between polaron to form bipolarons are not yet available. These calculations would help to identify the carrier distribution in Magneli clusters, which were shown recently to contain high carrier concentrations and may indicate totally localized superconductivity in non-percolating clusters. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
From SrTiO3 to Cuprates and Back to SrTiO3: A Way Along Alex Müller’s Scientific Career
Condens. Matter 2021, 6(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat6010002 - 31 Dec 2020
Viewed by 730
Abstract
K.A. Müller took a long route in science leaving many traces and imprints, which have been and are still today initiations for further research activities. We “walk” along this outstanding path but are certainly not able to provide a complete picture of it, [...] Read more.
K.A. Müller took a long route in science leaving many traces and imprints, which have been and are still today initiations for further research activities. We “walk” along this outstanding path but are certainly not able to provide a complete picture of it, since the way was not always straight, often marked by unintended detours, which had novel impact on the international research society. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Revival of Charge Density Waves and Charge Density Fluctuations in Cuprate High-Temperature Superconductors
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040070 - 02 Nov 2020
Viewed by 698
Abstract
I present here a short memory of my scientific contacts with K.A. Müller starting from the Interlaken Conference (1988), Erice (1992 and 1993), and Cottbus (1994) on the initial studies on phase separation (PS) and charge inhomogeneity in cuprates carried out against the [...] Read more.
I present here a short memory of my scientific contacts with K.A. Müller starting from the Interlaken Conference (1988), Erice (1992 and 1993), and Cottbus (1994) on the initial studies on phase separation (PS) and charge inhomogeneity in cuprates carried out against the view of the majority of the scientific community at that time. Going over the years and passing through the charge density wave (CDW) instability of the correlated Fermi liquid (FL) and to the consequences of charge density fluctuations (CDFs), I end with a presentation of my current research activity on CDWs and the related two-dimensional charge density fluctuations (2D-CDFs). A scenario follows of the physics of cuprates, which includes the solution of the decades-long problem of the strange metal (SM) state. Full article
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Open AccessReview
SrTiO3—Glimpses of an Inexhaustible Source of Novel Solid State Phenomena
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040058 - 04 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 788
Abstract
The purpose of this selective review is primarily to demonstrate the large versatility of the insulating quantum paraelectric perovskite SrTiO3 explained in “Introduction” part, and “Routes of SrTiO3 toward ferroelectricity and other collective states” part. Apart from ferroelectricity under various boundary [...] Read more.
The purpose of this selective review is primarily to demonstrate the large versatility of the insulating quantum paraelectric perovskite SrTiO3 explained in “Introduction” part, and “Routes of SrTiO3 toward ferroelectricity and other collective states” part. Apart from ferroelectricity under various boundary conditions, it exhibits regular electronic and superconductivity via doping or external fields and is capable of displaying diverse coupled states. “Magnetoelectric multiglass (Sr,Mn)TiO3” part, deals with mesoscopic physics of the solid solution SrTiO3:Mn2+. It is at the origin of both polar and spin cluster glass forming and is altogether a novel multiferroic system. Independent transitions at different glass temperatures, power law dynamic criticality, divergent third-order susceptibilities, and higher order magneto-electric interactions are convincing fingerprints. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Unconventional Magnetism in Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5020042 - 20 Jun 2020
Viewed by 1208
Abstract
In this contribution to the MDPI Condensed Matter issue in Honor of Nobel Laureate Professor K.A. Müller I review recent experimental progress on magnetism of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) from the local-magnetic probe point of view such as muon-spin rotation and discuss [...] Read more.
In this contribution to the MDPI Condensed Matter issue in Honor of Nobel Laureate Professor K.A. Müller I review recent experimental progress on magnetism of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) from the local-magnetic probe point of view such as muon-spin rotation and discuss prospects for the creation of unique new device concepts with these materials. TMDs are the prominent class of layered materials, that exhibit a vast range of interesting properties including unconventional semiconducting, optical, and transport behavior originating from valley splitting. Until recently, this family has been missing one crucial member: magnetic semiconductor. The situation has changed over the past few years with the discovery of layered semiconducting magnetic crystals, for example CrI 3 and VI 2 . We have also very recently discovered unconventional magnetism in semiconducting Mo-based TMD systems 2H-MoTe 2 and 2H-MoSe 2 [Guguchia et. al., Science Advances 2018, 4(12)]. Moreover, we also show the evidence for the involvement of magnetism in semiconducting tungsten diselenide 2H-WSe 2 . These results open a path to studying the interplay of 2D physics, semiconducting properties and magnetism in TMDs. It also opens up a host of new opportunities to obtain tunable magnetic semiconductors, forming the basis for spintronics. Full article
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Other

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Open AccessPerspective
The Role of the Short Coherence Length in Unconventional Superconductors
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040077 - 01 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 686
Abstract
A short coherence length is a distinctive feature of many cases of unconventional superconductivity. While in conventional superconductors, it is many orders of magnitude larger than the basic inter-particle distance, a short coherence length is common to superconductors as diverse as the cuprates, [...] Read more.
A short coherence length is a distinctive feature of many cases of unconventional superconductivity. While in conventional superconductors, it is many orders of magnitude larger than the basic inter-particle distance, a short coherence length is common to superconductors as diverse as the cuprates, the picnites and granular superconductors. We dwell particularly on the last, because their simple chemical structure makes them a favorable material for exploring fundamental phenomena such as the Bardeen-Cooper Schrieffer (BCS)-to-Bose–Einstein condensation cross-over and the effect of the vicinity of a Mott metal-to-insulator transition. Full article
Open AccessCreative
Color Centers and Jahn-Teller Effect in Ionic Crystals—My Scientific Encounters with Alex Müller
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040059 - 15 Oct 2020
Viewed by 674
Abstract
This contribution presents a personal account of the influence Karl Alex Müller had on the early stages of my career and the scientific questions about which we exchanged our views over the years. While both our research branched into a variety of topics, [...] Read more.
This contribution presents a personal account of the influence Karl Alex Müller had on the early stages of my career and the scientific questions about which we exchanged our views over the years. While both our research branched into a variety of topics, the common experimental technique, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, and the Jahn-Teller effect led to fruitful exchanges of ideas on these matters in semiconducting, metallic and ionic crystals. Full article
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Open AccessCreative
A Retrospective of Materials Synthesis at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI)
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040055 - 23 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 637
Abstract
The availability of high-quality and well characterized materials is a key factor for condensed-matter research [...] Full article
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Open AccessCreative
Meetings with a Remarkable Man, Alex Müller—The Professor of SrTiO3
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5030044 - 02 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 763
Abstract
After my bachelor degree in chemistry with physics and mathematics (in Dutch kandidaatsexamen) at the University of Amsterdam, I chose to study for my master degree (in Dutch doctoraal) a physical chemistry direction [...] Full article
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Open AccessCreative
The Crucial Things in Science Often Happen Quite Unexpectedly—Das Entscheidende in der Wissenschaft geschieht oft ganz unerwartet (K. Alex Müller)
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(3), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5030043 - 01 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 722
Abstract
We analyzed the publication output of one of the 1987 Nobel Prize awardees, K. Alex Müller, using bibliometric methods. The time-dependent number of publications and citations and the network with respect to the coauthors and their affiliations was studied. Specifically, the citation history [...] Read more.
We analyzed the publication output of one of the 1987 Nobel Prize awardees, K. Alex Müller, using bibliometric methods. The time-dependent number of publications and citations and the network with respect to the coauthors and their affiliations was studied. Specifically, the citation history of the Nobel Prize awarded 1986 article on “Possible high-temperature superconductivity in the Ba-La-Cu-O system” has been evaluated in terms of the overall number of articles on superconductivity and the corresponding citations of other most frequently referenced articles. Thereby, a publication with “delayed recognition” was identified. Full article
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