Special Issue "Advances in Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Stem Cells".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Laura Lasagni

Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences “Mario Serio”, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139, Florence, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: stem cells; kidney regeneration; cancer stem cells; renal diseases; cell hypertrophy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleauges,

Regenerative medicine is a diverse and rapidly evolving field focused on enhancing the body’s ability to regenerate healthy tissue and overcome disease processes. Regenerative medicine is an interdisclinary approach employing core expertise from developmental biologists, stem cell biologists, clinicians, experts in chemistry and the physical sciences, engineers and imaging experts. The broad approaches of regenerative medicine are: (i) to understand the intrinsic repair mechanisms within tissues to promote these to improve healthy regeneration and reduce pathological wound healing responses, such as excessive scarring, and (ii) develop cell therapies whereby exogenous cells and organoids can be transplanted into tissues to help repair the damaged tissue or organs. To mimic in vitro the dynamic environment of healthy and diseased human tissues and organs, 3D microengineering approaches have been developed. Organ-on-a-chip is a promising technology to construct organ-specific microenvironments, reconstituting tissue structures, tissue-tissue interactions and interfaces, and dynamic mechanical and biochemical stimuli found in specific organs, to direct cells to assemble into functional tissues.

The current Special Issue will accept original studies, reviews and technical reports in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine, written by researchers active in the field. Studies on the function of stem cells in different tissues and organs, influence of the niche during aging, injury and regeneration will be welcomed. Moreover, contributions in the field of “organ-on-a-chip” techonology will be appreciated.

Prof. Laura Lasagni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tissue-specific stem cells
  • regenerative medicine
  • stem cell niche
  • differentiation
  • organoid
  • organ-on-a-chip
  • disease modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Administration of Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improves Glucose Tolerance in High Fat Diet-Induced Diabetic Mice via Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 5-Mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Modulation
Received: 20 March 2019 / Revised: 14 April 2019 / Accepted: 19 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
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Abstract
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent chronic metabolic disorder accompanied by high blood glucose, insulin resistance, and relative insulin deficiency. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by high glucose and free fatty acids has been suggested as one of the main causes [...] Read more.
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent chronic metabolic disorder accompanied by high blood glucose, insulin resistance, and relative insulin deficiency. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by high glucose and free fatty acids has been suggested as one of the main causes of β-cell dysfunction and death in T2DM. Stem cell-derived insulin-secreting cells were recently suggested as a novel therapy for diabetes. In the present study, we demonstrate the therapeutic potential of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (TMSCs) to treat high-fat diet (HFD)-induced T2DM. To explore whether TMSC administration can alleviate T2DM, TMSCs were intraperitoneally injected in HFD-induced T2DM mice once every 2 weeks. TMSC injection markedly improved glucose tolerance and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and prevented HFD-induced pancreatic β-cell hypertrophy and cell death. In addition, TMSC injection relieved the ER-stress response and preserved gene expression related to glucose sensing and insulin secretion. Moreover, administration of TMSC-derived conditioned medium induced similar therapeutic outcomes, suggesting paracrine effects. Finally, proteomic analysis revealed high secretion of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 by TMSCs, and its expression was critical for the protective effects of TMSCs against HFD-induced glucose intolerance and ER-stress response in pancreatic islets. TMSC administration can alleviate HFD-induced-T2DM via preserving pancreatic islets and their function. These results provide novel evidence of TMSCs as an ER-stress modulator that may be a novel, alternative cell therapy for T2DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Subcutaneous Maturation of Neural Stem Cell-Loaded Hydrogels Forms Region-Specific Neuroepithelium
Cells 2018, 7(10), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells7100173
Received: 13 September 2018 / Revised: 9 October 2018 / Accepted: 11 October 2018 / Published: 17 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1919 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A combinatorial approach integrating stem cells and capable of exploiting available cues is likely needed to regenerate lost neural tissues and ultimately restore neurologic functions. This study investigates the effects of the subcutaneous maturation of adult-derived neural stem cell (aNSCs) seeded into biomaterial [...] Read more.
A combinatorial approach integrating stem cells and capable of exploiting available cues is likely needed to regenerate lost neural tissues and ultimately restore neurologic functions. This study investigates the effects of the subcutaneous maturation of adult-derived neural stem cell (aNSCs) seeded into biomaterial constructs on aNSC differentiation and ultimate regional neuronal identity as a first step toward a future spinal cord injury treatment. To achieve this, we encapsulated rat aNSCs in chitosan-based hydrogels functionalized with immobilized azide-tagged interferon-γ inside a chitosan conduit. Then, we implanted these constructs in the subcutaneous tissues in the backs of rats in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions for 4, 6, and 8 weeks. After harvesting the scaffolds, we analyzed cell differentiation qualitatively using immunohistochemical analysis and quantitatively using RT-qPCR. Results revealed that the hydrogels supported aNSC survival and differentiation up to 4 weeks in the subcutaneous environment as marked by the expression of several neurogenesis markers. Most interesting, the aNSCs expressed region-specific Hox genes corresponding to their region of implantation. This study lays the groundwork for further translational work to recapitulate the potentially undiscovered patterning cues in the subcutaneous tissue and provide support for the conceptual premise that our bioengineering approach can form caudalized region-specific neuroepithelium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
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Figure 1

Review

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Open AccessReview
Advances in Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy in Androgenic Alopecia and Hair Loss: Wnt Pathway, Growth-Factor, and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Signaling Impact Analysis on Cell Growth and Hair Follicle Development
Received: 2 April 2019 / Revised: 13 May 2019 / Accepted: 14 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
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Abstract
The use of stem cells has been reported to improve hair regrowth in several therapeutic strategies, including reversing the pathological mechanisms, that contribute to hair loss, regeneration of hair follicles, or creating hair using the tissue-engineering approach. Although various promising stem cell approaches [...] Read more.
The use of stem cells has been reported to improve hair regrowth in several therapeutic strategies, including reversing the pathological mechanisms, that contribute to hair loss, regeneration of hair follicles, or creating hair using the tissue-engineering approach. Although various promising stem cell approaches are progressing via pre-clinical models to clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell treatments with a one-step procedure offer a quicker result by incorporating an autologous cell source without manipulation, which may be injected by surgeons through a well-established clinical practice. Many authors have concentrated on adipose-derived stromal vascular cells due to their ability to separate into numerous cell genealogies, platelet-rich plasma for its ability to enhance cell multiplication and neo-angiogenesis, as well as human follicle mesenchymal stem cells. In this paper, the significant improvements in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical investigations, are reviewed. The potential regenerative instruments and functions of various cell populaces in the hair regrowth process are discussed. The addition of Wnt signaling in dermal papilla cells is considered a key factor in stimulating hair growth. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived signaling and growth factors obtained by platelets influence hair growth through cellular proliferation to prolong the anagen phase (FGF-7), induce cell growth (ERK activation), stimulate hair follicle development (β-catenin), and suppress apoptotic cues (Bcl-2 release and Akt activation). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
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