Special Issue "The Roles of microRNAs in Cancer Aggressiveness and Drug Resistance"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Cancer Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bi-Dar Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy, One College Backbone Rd, Princess Anne, MD 21853, USA
Interests: cancer genomics; microRNA-mRNA interaction; aberrant RNA splicing; precision cancer biomarkers; molecular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance
Dr. Luciane R Cavalli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Professor,Research Institute Pelé Pequeno Príncipe, Faculdades Pequeno Príncipe, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
2. Adjunct Professor of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mature microRNAs are small noncoding regulatory RNAs of 21-25 nucleotides in length that complementarily target mRNAs to promote mRNA degradation and/or inhibit protein translation. Emerging data suggest that microRNA aberration may play critical roles in cancer development and progression. Particularly, genomic studies (both array- and sequencing-based) have accelerated the identification of microRNA involvement in the tumor pathogenesis. With scientific discoveries of oncogenic and tumor suppressive microRNAs and their roles in different cancer types, there is a great potential of developing microRNAs as precision biomarkers in cancer diagnosis and/or prognosis. Furthermore, several microRNAs tested in the preclinical models and clinical trials have shown promising therapeutic potentials, although finding an effective microRNA delivery system remains a challenge in microRNA-based therapeutics.

This Special Issue focuses on understanding the functional roles and molecular mechanisms of microRNAs in promoting cancer aggressiveness (i.e., metastasis) and treatment resistance. Novel strategies for developing microRNA-based biomarkers and therapeutics will be included, based on the functional/pathological implications of microRNAs in cancers.

Dr. Bi-Dar Wang
Dr. Luciane R Cavalli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microRNA
  • metastasis
  • treatment resistance
  • biomarker
  • drug target

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Cancer Cells’ Metabolism Dynamics in Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients’ Outcome: Influence of GLUT-1-Related hsa-miR-144 and hsa-miR-186
Cancers 2021, 13(7), 1733; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13071733 - 06 Apr 2021
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Abstract
The cancer cells’ metabolism is altered due to deregulation of key proteins, including glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1), whose mRNA levels are influenced by microRNAs (miRNAs). Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common and lethal neoplasia in the adult kidney, mostly due to [...] Read more.
The cancer cells’ metabolism is altered due to deregulation of key proteins, including glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1), whose mRNA levels are influenced by microRNAs (miRNAs). Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common and lethal neoplasia in the adult kidney, mostly due to the lack of accurate diagnosis and follow-up biomarkers. Being a metabolic associated cancer, this study aimed to understand the hsa-miR-144-5p and hsa-miR-186-3p’s potential as biomarkers of clear cell RCC (ccRCC), establishing their role in its glycolysis status. Using three ccRCC lines, the intra- and extracellular levels of both miRNAs, GLUT-1’s mRNA expression and protein levels were assessed. Glucose consumption and lactate production were evaluated as glycolysis markers. A decrease of intracellular levels of these miRNAs and increase of their excretion was observed, associated with an increase of GLUT-1’s levels and glycolysis’ markers. Through a liquid biopsy approach, we found that RCC patients present higher plasmatic levels of hsa-miR-186-3p than healthy individuals. The Hsa-miR144-5p’s higher levels were associated with early clinical stages. When patients were stratified according to miRNAs plasmatic levels, low plasmatic levels of hsa-miR-144-5p and high plasmatic levels of hsa-miR-186-3p (high-risk group) showed the worst overall survival. Thus, circulating levels of these miRNAs may be potential biomarkers of ccRCC prognosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Roles of microRNAs in Cancer Aggressiveness and Drug Resistance)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Regulators at Every Step—How microRNAs Drive Tumor Cell Invasiveness and Metastasis
Cancers 2020, 12(12), 3709; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12123709 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 815
Abstract
Tumor cell invasiveness and metastasis are the main causes of mortality in cancer. Tumor progression is composed of many steps, including primary tumor growth, local invasion, intravasation, survival in the circulation, pre-metastatic niche formation, and metastasis. All these steps are strictly controlled by [...] Read more.
Tumor cell invasiveness and metastasis are the main causes of mortality in cancer. Tumor progression is composed of many steps, including primary tumor growth, local invasion, intravasation, survival in the circulation, pre-metastatic niche formation, and metastasis. All these steps are strictly controlled by microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNA that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs can act as oncomiRs that promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis or as tumor suppressor miRNAs that inhibit tumor progression. These miRNAs regulate the actin cytoskeleton, the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors including integrins and ECM-remodeling enzymes comprising matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and regulate epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), hence modulating cell migration and invasiveness. Moreover, miRNAs regulate angiogenesis, the formation of a pre-metastatic niche, and metastasis. Thus, miRNAs are biomarkers of metastases as well as promising targets of therapy. In this review, we comprehensively describe the role of various miRNAs in tumor cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Roles of microRNAs in Cancer Aggressiveness and Drug Resistance)
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