Special Issue "Unilateral Neglect Assessment and Rehabilitation"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Cecilia Guariglia
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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy
Cognitive and Motor Rehabilitation Unit, IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia of Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: Spatial cognition and memory; Human navigation; Clinical neuropsychology; Neuropsychological rehabilitation; Topographical disorientation; Developmental topographical disorientation; individual differences and aging
Dr. Mauro Mancuso
E-Mail
Guest Editor
National Health Service, Physical and Rehabilitative Medicine Unit, Az.USL Tuscany, SouthEst-Grosseto, Italy
Interests: hemispatial Neglect; stroke rehabilitation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) is a frequent and often underestimated cognitive disorder which impairs the recovery of patients with acquired brain lesions.

In recent years, efforts have been directed towards developing new assessment tools and effective treatments, however, shared approaches for the assessment of USN and tailored treatments are still presently lacking.

The aim of this Special Issue is to give an overview of the recent advancements in the treatment of USN and the evaluation of rehabilitation efficacy. We are also interested in studies regarding the effectiveness of traditional or novel treatments on functionality and long-term outcomes, in particular, studies aimed at facilitating the recovery of daily life functioning, or assessing and/or treating selective aspects of USN syndrome.

Prof. Dr. Cecilia Guariglia
Dr. Mauro Mancuso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • Unilateral spatial neglect
  • USN
  • cognitive disorder
  • rehabilitation efficacy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Spatial Neglect in Stroke: Identification, Disease Process and Association with Outcome During Inpatient Rehabilitation
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(12), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9120374 - 13 Dec 2019
Abstract
We established spatial neglect prevalence, disease profile and amount of therapy that inpatient stroke survivors received, and outcomes at discharge using Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (SSNAP) data. We used data from 88,664 National Health Service (NHS) admissions in England, Wales and Northern [...] Read more.
We established spatial neglect prevalence, disease profile and amount of therapy that inpatient stroke survivors received, and outcomes at discharge using Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme (SSNAP) data. We used data from 88,664 National Health Service (NHS) admissions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (July 2013–July 2015), for stroke survivors still in hospital after 3 days with a completed baseline neglect National Institute for Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Thirty percent had neglect (NIHSS item 11 ≥ 1) and they were slightly older (78 years) than those without neglect (75 years). Neglect was observed more commonly in women (33 vs. 27%) and in individuals with a premorbid dependency (37 vs. 28%). Survivors of mild stroke were far less likely to present with neglect than those with severe stroke (4% vs. 84%). Those with neglect had a greatly increased length of stay (27 vs. 10 days). They received a comparable amount of average daily occupational and physiotherapy during their longer inpatient stay but on discharge a greater percentage of individuals with neglect were dependent on the modified Rankin scale (76 vs. 57%). Spatial neglect is common and associated with worse clinical outcomes. These results add to our understanding of neglect to inform clinical guidelines, service provision and priorities for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Unilateral Neglect Assessment and Rehabilitation)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Prism Adaptation on Reference Systems for Extrapersonal Space in Neglect Patients
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(11), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9110327 - 16 Nov 2019
Abstract
Up to now, rehabilitation of unilateral spatial neglect has focused on egocentric forms of neglect, whereas less is known about the possibility to improve allocentric deficits. The present study aimed to examine the efficacy of prism adaptation (PA) training on patients with different [...] Read more.
Up to now, rehabilitation of unilateral spatial neglect has focused on egocentric forms of neglect, whereas less is known about the possibility to improve allocentric deficits. The present study aimed to examine the efficacy of prism adaptation (PA) training on patients with different forms of neglect: egocentric, allocentric, or mixed. Twenty-eight patients were assessed with specific neglect tests before (T0) and after (T1) 10 sessions of PA training. Performance in the Apples Cancellation test was used to identify patients with egocentric (n = 6), allocentric (n = 5), or mixed (n = 17) forms of neglect. In the overall group of patients, PA training produced significant improvements in performance across different neglect tests. In terms of the egocentric–allocentric distinction, the training was effective in reducing omissions in the left part of space in the Apples Cancellation test both for patients with egocentric neglect and mixed neglect. By contrast, errors of commissions (marking the inability to detect the left part of the target stimulus, i.e., allocentric neglect) remained unchanged after PA in patients with allocentric neglect and actually increased marginally in patients with mixed neglect. The PA training is effective in improving egocentric neglect, while it is ineffective on the allocentric form of the disturbance. Notably, the allocentric component of neglect is frequently impaired, although this is most often in conjunction with the egocentric impairment, yielding the mixed form of neglect. This stresses the importance of developing exercises tuned to improving allocentric neglect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Unilateral Neglect Assessment and Rehabilitation)
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