Special Issue "Feature Papers: State-of-the-Art Biosensors Technology 2018"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Alisa Rudnitskaya

CESAM and Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +351 234401527 (ext. 24903)
Interests: multisensor systems, electronic tongues, electroanalysis, chemometrics, food analysis, environmental analysis, electrochemical sensors and biosensors
Guest Editor
Dr. Beate Strehlitz

Department Environmental and Biotechnology Centre, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +49 341 2351764
Fax: +49 341 2351764
Interests: aptamer selection and characterization; SELEX; aptamer based sensors and assays; biosensor development and application; bioelectrotechnology; bioelectrochemistry
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Donald Y.C. Lie

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC), Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-3102, USAx 43102, Lubbock, TX 79409-3102, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +806-834-2440
Fax: +806-742-1245
Interests: Low−Power RF/Analog Integrated Circuits & System−on−a−Chip (SoC) Design and Test; Interdisciplinary Research on Medical Electronics, Biosensors, & Biosignal Processing
Guest Editor
Dr. Fatih Inci

Department of Radiology, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3155 Porter Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microfluidics; lab-on-a-chip; plasmonic biosensors; bionanotechnology; nanoplasmonics; wearable sensors; infectious diseases; HIV/AIDS; cancer research; personalized medicine; point of care diagnostics; mobile health; global health; biomedical engineering; molecular diagnostics; telemedicine
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chung-Chih Hung

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, 30010, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: analog and mixed-signal integrated circuit design; biomedical integrated circuit design; biomedical engineering; wearable and implantable devices & sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the Biosensors Editorial Board, it is a pleasure to announce this Special Issue, “Feature Papers: State-of-the-Art Biosensors Technology 2018”. Biosensors are devices that use a biological recognition element retained in direct spatial contact with a transduction system (Thevenot D.R., Tòth K., Durst R.A., Wilson G.S. (2001) Electrochemical Biosensors: Recommended Definitions and Classification Pure Appl. Chem. 71 2333). A biosensor converts a biological recognition event into a measurable signal. It consists of a biorecognition element (e.g., enzyme, antibody, tissue, living cell, etc.) that provides selectivity and a transducer (e.g., electrochemical, optical, piezoelectrical, etc.) that converts the biological recognition reaction into a measurable and quantifiable signal. The connected electronics are responsible for signal processing and user-friendly result visualization.

We would like to invite you to submit an article, which will provide an up-to-date perspective in the field, to this Special Issue. We will strictly select papers from excellent scholars around the world to publish for free in this Special Issue to benefit both authors and readers.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Immunosensors;
  • Enzymatic biosensors;
  • Whole cell biosensors;
  • DNA based biosensors;
  • Paper-based biosensors;
  • Thick film printed biosensors;
  • Micro- and Nanobiosensors;
  • Biomimetic materials for biosensing (molecularly imprinted polymers, aptamers, odorant binding proteins, etc.);
  • Biomarkers for Diagnostics;
  • Point-of-care applications;
  • Lab-on-a-chip technology;
  • Microfluidic devices;
  • Biomedical engineering;
  • Wearable and implantable sensors;
  • Environmental applications;
  • Further applications, e.g., food industry and control, biotechnology, etc.

Deadline for submission is 31 December, 2018. Authors are welcome to send short proposals for submissions of feature papers to our Editorial Office ([email protected]).

Dr. Alisa Rudnitskaya
Dr. Beate Strehlitz
Prof. Dr. Donald Y.C. Lie
Dr. Fatih Inci
Prof. Dr. Chung-Chih Hung
Guest editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Detection of Breast Cancer Cells Using Acoustics Aptasensor Specific to HER2 Receptors
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020072
Received: 23 April 2019 / Revised: 17 May 2019 / Accepted: 23 May 2019 / Published: 27 May 2019
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Abstract
Detection of the breast cancer cells is important for early diagnosis of the cancer. We applied thickness shear mode acoustics method (TSM) for detection of SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells using DNA aptamers specific to HER2 positive membrane receptors. The biotinylated aptamers were immobilized [...] Read more.
Detection of the breast cancer cells is important for early diagnosis of the cancer. We applied thickness shear mode acoustics method (TSM) for detection of SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells using DNA aptamers specific to HER2 positive membrane receptors. The biotinylated aptamers were immobilized at the neutravidin layer chemisorbed at gold surface of TSM transducer. Addition of the cells resulted in decrease of resonant frequency, fs, and in increase of motional resistance, Rm. Using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), modified by aptamers it was possible improving the limit of detection (LOD) that reached 550 cells/mL, while without amplification the sensitivity of the detection of SK-BR-3 cells was 1574 cells/mL. HER2 negative cell line MDA-MB-231 did not resulted in significant changes of fs. The viability studies demonstrated that cells are stable at experimental conditions used during at least 8 h. AuNPs were not toxic on the cells up to concentration of 1 μg/mL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: State-of-the-Art Biosensors Technology 2018)
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Open AccessArticle
Differentiation of Patients with Balance Insufficiency (Vestibular Hypofunction) versus Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010029
Received: 27 December 2018 / Revised: 2 February 2019 / Accepted: 21 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2984 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Balance disorders present a significant healthcare burden due to the potential for hospitalization or complications for the patient, especially among the elderly population when considering intangible losses such as quality of life, morbidities, and mortalities. This work is a continuation of our earlier [...] Read more.
Balance disorders present a significant healthcare burden due to the potential for hospitalization or complications for the patient, especially among the elderly population when considering intangible losses such as quality of life, morbidities, and mortalities. This work is a continuation of our earlier works where we now examine feature extraction methodology on Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests and machine learning classifiers to differentiate patients with balance problems versus normal subjects on an expanded cohort of 60 patients. All data was obtained using our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS) containing a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) worn by each subject during the DGI tests. The raw gait data is wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS for real-time gait data collection and analysis. Here we demonstrate predictive classifiers that achieve high accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in distinguishing abnormal from normal gaits. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real-time using various classifiers. Our ultimate goal is to be able to use a remote sensor such as the WGAS to accurately stratify an individual’s risk for falls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: State-of-the-Art Biosensors Technology 2018)
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Open AccessArticle
Biochemical Changes in Irradiated Oral Mucosa: A FTIR Spectroscopic Study
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010012
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 11 January 2019 / Published: 13 January 2019
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Abstract
Radiation exposure during the course of treatment in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients can induce both structural and biochemical anomalies. The present study is focused on utilizing infrared imaging for the identification of the minor biochemical alterations in the oral mucosa. Chemical [...] Read more.
Radiation exposure during the course of treatment in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients can induce both structural and biochemical anomalies. The present study is focused on utilizing infrared imaging for the identification of the minor biochemical alterations in the oral mucosa. Chemical maps generated using glycoprotein band indicates its differential distribution along the superficial layer. Spectra extracted from this layer suggests changes in overall nucleic acid and protein content in response to the therapeutic irradiation. Discrimination among control and irradiated groups have been achieved using principal component analysis. Findings of this preliminary study further support prospective utilization of Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) imaging as a non-destructive, label-free tool for objective assessment of the oral mucosa in patient groups with or without radiation therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: State-of-the-Art Biosensors Technology 2018)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization and Inkjet Printing of an RNA Aptamer for Paper-Based Biosensing of Ciprofloxacin
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010007
Received: 26 November 2018 / Revised: 24 December 2018 / Accepted: 26 December 2018 / Published: 2 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (20586 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The excessive use of antibiotics in food-producing animals causes a steady rise of multiple antibiotic resistance in foodborne bacteria. Next to sulfonamides, the most common antibiotics groups are fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and ß-lactams. Therefore, there is a need for a quick, efficient, and low-cost [...] Read more.
The excessive use of antibiotics in food-producing animals causes a steady rise of multiple antibiotic resistance in foodborne bacteria. Next to sulfonamides, the most common antibiotics groups are fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and ß-lactams. Therefore, there is a need for a quick, efficient, and low-cost detection procedure for antibiotics. In this study, we propose an inkjet-printed aptamer-based biosensor developed for the detection of the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. Due to their extraordinary high affinity and specificity, aptamers are already widely used in various applications. Here we present a ciprofloxacin-binding RNA aptamer developed by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). We characterized the secondary structure of the aptamer and determined the KD to 36 nM that allow detection of antibiotic contamination in a relevant range. We demonstrate that RNA aptamers can be inkjet-printed, dried, and resolved while keeping their functionality consistently intact. With this proof of concept, we are paving the way for a potential range of additional aptamer-based, printable biosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: State-of-the-Art Biosensors Technology 2018)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
A Review of the Construction of Nano-Hybrids for Electrochemical Biosensing of Glucose
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010046
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 15 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
PDF Full-text (2403 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Continuous progress in the domain of nano and material science has led to modulation of the properties of nanomaterials in a controlled and desired fashion. In this sense, nanomaterials, including carbon-based materials, metals and metal oxides, and composite/hybrid materials have attracted extensive interest [...] Read more.
Continuous progress in the domain of nano and material science has led to modulation of the properties of nanomaterials in a controlled and desired fashion. In this sense, nanomaterials, including carbon-based materials, metals and metal oxides, and composite/hybrid materials have attracted extensive interest with regard to the construction of electrochemical biosensors. The modification of a working electrode with a combination of two or three nanomaterials in the form of nano-composite/nano-hybrids has revealed good results with very good reproducibility, stability, and improved sensitivity. This review paper is focused on discussing the possible constructs of nano-hybrids and their subsequent use in the construction of electrochemical glucose biosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: State-of-the-Art Biosensors Technology 2018)
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